NASA

A ghostly crescent of the Moon is seen in this image captured by European Space Agency (@europeanspaceagency) astronaut Alexander Gerst (@Astro_Alex_esa) from the vantage point of the International Space Station (@iss). He posted it to social media saying, “By orbiting the Earth almost 16 times per day, the #ISS crew travel the distance to the Moon and back – every day.” Currently, six humans are living and working on the space station, which orbits our planet from 250 miles above at 17,500 mph. While onboard, they conduct important science and research that not only benefits life here on Earth, but will help send humans deeper into the solar system than ever before.
Credit: @Astro_Alex_ESA
#nasa #space #SpaceStation #International #Moon #Earth #Horizon #beautiful #PictureOfTheDay #orbit #ESA #Astronaut #research #science #photography

A ghostly crescent of the Moon is seen in this image captured by European Space Agency (@europeanspaceagency) astronaut Alexander Gerst (@Astro_Alex_esa) from the vantage point of the International Space Station (@iss). He posted it to social media saying, “By orbiting the Earth almost 16 times per day, the #ISS crew travel the distance to the Moon and back – every day.” Currently, six humans are living and working on the space station, which orbits our planet from 250 miles above at 17,500 mph. While onboard, they conduct important science and research that not only benefits life here on Earth, but will help send humans deeper into the solar system than ever before. 
Credit: @Astro_Alex_ESA 
#nasa #space #SpaceStation #International #Moon #Earth #Horizon #beautiful #PictureOfTheDay #orbit #ESA #Astronaut #research #science #photography

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@patreekotheartist

Not 'photoshopped'. It's called compression, and it's the visual effect of using a very long photographic lens or telescope. Pro tip... If the moon looks really big in a photograph, then a really long lens was used to take it. Photographs taken with long lenses tend to not look 'real' to us, because we are used to the way our eyes and brains process visual information.

@_twinwytii_

Wheres the lower portion of the moon???

@jack_reichenbach

@muntasirj Because no one ever went. It was all faked. Research the Van Allen Radiation Belts that keep us from traveling to the moon. The Russian knew it. NASA knew it but they faked the moon landing anyway.

@tarykus

@alawnii dude you misunderstood some verses of Quran. Dont just read them understand them carefully...

@lovefutba11

سلطان کریس❤️

@_bradley_hardy_

That’s not the moon, it’s the Death Star

@xiaohan.ni

世界好奇妙

@bradleykillen

@europeanspaceagency I got one!! "If you believe!!! We put a man on the moon? Man on the moon?? Whoa! If you believeee theres nothing up their sleeves? And everything's cool... Monday moves boy it's the game of life... yeah yeah yeah yeah" ;)

@roambiel

ما هذا

@krrp_345

Incrível

@tilsblue

@luuke.pearson okay 👌🏼😊 your explanation is more in depth and makes sense thank you 🙏🏻

@luuke.pearson

@tilsblue you should look into the physics of interplanetary travel. You don’t just “launch” a probe pointing to another planets and it gets itself there. It requires complicated orbit transfers and engine burns to move from one orbit to the other. That means your probe it attached to a rocket until it gets to the proper target orbit. Which means that a) cannot be turned around to take pictures, b) by the time it’s on its own, it’s so far away from earth that the optics are not powerful enough to capture the type of picture you want, c) pointing the entire stage to earth would consume OMS fuel that will be required for accomplishing the probe’s mission. I suggest you read about hohman transfer orbits and figure it out by yourself ;) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hohmann_transfer_orbit

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