#spothubble

Instagram photos and videos

#space#hubble#spothubble#nasa#solarsystem#pictureoftheday#picoftheday#uranus#planets#planet#rings#colors#universe#galaxy#beautiful#telescope#astronomy#Repost#science#lightyears#star#supernova#exploded#explosion#exploration#discovery#irregular#stars#NASA#light#cosmicrays#nebula#نجوم#stellar#god#علم

Hashtags #spothubble for Instagram

..... A new study using data from our NuSTAR space telescope suggests that Eta Carinae, the most luminous and massive stellar system within 10,000 light-years, is accelerating particles to high energies — some of which may reach Earth as cosmic rays, subatomic particles from outside our planet’s atmosphere.
Eta Carinae's great eruption in the 1840s created the billowing Homunculus Nebula, imaged here by our Hubble Space Telescope (@nasahubble). Now about a light-year long, the expanding cloud contains enough material to make at least 10 copies of our Sun. Astronomers cannot yet explain what caused this eruption.
Credit: NASA/@EuropeanSpaceAgency/@NASAHubble/SM4 ERO Team

#NASA #space #stellar #hubble #space #telescope #stars #nebula #astronomy #spothubble #solarsystem #universe #galaxy #pictureoftheday #beautiful #picoftheday #cosmicrays #lightyears #technology #tech #techy #wow #redlight #red #light
#beatuiful #awesome #camera


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#Repost @nasa with @get_repost
・・・😍
Glowing warmly against the dark backdrop of the universe, this irregular galaxy seen by our Hubble Space Telescope (@NASAHubble) contains bright pockets of star formation. Located approximately 70 million light-years away, it’s host to a particularly interesting exploded star, also known as a supernova.

In November 2008, 14-year-old Caroline Moore from New York discovered this supernova, which made her the youngest person at the time to have discovered one. Follow-up observations by professional astronomers showed that it was peculiarly interesting in many different ways.
First, its host galaxy rarely produces supernovae. It is also one of the faintest supernovae ever observed and after the explosion it expanded very slowly, suggesting that the explosion did not release copious amounts of energy as usually expected. Astronomers have now classified it as a subclass of a Type Ia supernova, which is the explosion of a white dwarf that hungrily accretes matter from a companion star. It may have may have been the result of a partially failed supernova, explaining why the explosion failed to decimate the whole star.

Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA

#nasa #space #hubble #spothubble #universe #solarsystem #galaxy #supernova #exploded #star #irregular #beautiful #lightyears #discovery #exploration #telescope #astronomy #explosion #pictureoftheday #science #WOW #NASA


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Beautiful, sparkling arms swirl outward from a bar slicing through this galaxy’s center in this image captured by the Hubble Space Telescope (@NASAHubble). It is classified as an active galaxy, which means that it hosts an active galactic nucleus – a compact region at a galaxy’s center where material is dragged towards a supermassive black hole. As this black hole devours the surrounding matter it emits intense radiation, causing it to shine brightly.
But this galaxy is more exotic still. It essentially acts as a giant astronomical laser that also spews out light at microwave, not visible, wavelengths — this type of object is dubbed a megamaser (maser being the term for a microwave laser). Megamasers such as this can be some 100 million times brighter than masers found in galaxies like the Milky Way!
Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA
#nasa #space #hubble #spothubble #telescope #galaxy #universe #solarsystem #swirl #arms #beautiful #center #active #microwave #visible #light #bright #pictureoftheday #astronomy #science


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This edge-on view of a galaxy located about 45 million light-years away, showcases its beautiful arms, which swirl like a whirlpool around its bright central region. Astronomers took this image as they were observing an extraordinary exploding star – a supernova – near the galaxy’s central yellow core!
The star rapidly evolved from a supernova containing very little hydrogen to one that is hydrogen-rich — in just one year. This rarely observed metamorphosis was luminous at high energies and provides unique insight into the poorly understood final phases of massive stars.
By studying similar galaxies we hold a scientific mirror up to our own, allowing us to build a better understanding of our galactic environment, which we cannot always observe, and of galactic behavior and evolution as a whole.
Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA/D. Milisavljevic (Perdue University)
#nasa #space #hubble #spothubble #galaxy #lightyears #spacetelescope #telescope #pictureoftheday #spiral #swirl #whirlpool #astronomy #solarsystem #universe #beautiful #science #supernova


9

#Repost @nasa
Glowing warmly against the dark backdrop of the universe, this irregular galaxy seen by our Hubble Space Telescope (@NASAHubble) contains bright pockets of star formation. Located approximately 70 million light-years away, it’s host to a particularly interesting exploded star, also known as a supernova.

In November 2008, 14-year-old Caroline Moore from New York discovered this supernova, which made her the youngest person at the time to have discovered one. Follow-up observations by professional astronomers showed that it was peculiarly interesting in many different ways.
First, its host galaxy rarely produces supernovae. It is also one of the faintest supernovae ever observed and after the explosion it expanded very slowly, suggesting that the explosion did not release copious amounts of energy as usually expected. Astronomers have now classified it as a subclass of a Type Ia supernova, which is the explosion of a white dwarf that hungrily accretes matter from a companion star. It may have may have been the result of a partially failed supernova, explaining why the explosion failed to decimate the whole star.

Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA

#nasa #space #hubble #spothubble #universe #solarsystem #galaxy #supernova #exploded #star #irregular #beautiful #lightyears #discovery #exploration #telescope #astronomy #explosion #pictureoftheday #science


0

✨#Repost @nasa with @get_repost
・・・
Glowing warmly against the dark backdrop of the universe, this irregular galaxy seen by our Hubble Space Telescope (@NASAHubble) contains bright pockets of star formation. Located approximately 70 million light-years away, it’s host to a particularly interesting exploded star, also known as a supernova.

In November 2008, 14-year-old Caroline Moore from New York discovered this supernova, which made her the youngest person at the time to have discovered one. Follow-up observations by professional astronomers showed that it was peculiarly interesting in many different ways.
First, its host galaxy rarely produces supernovae. It is also one of the faintest supernovae ever observed and after the explosion it expanded very slowly, suggesting that the explosion did not release copious amounts of energy as usually expected. Astronomers have now classified it as a subclass of a Type Ia supernova, which is the explosion of a white dwarf that hungrily accretes matter from a companion star. It may have may have been the result of a partially failed supernova, explaining why the explosion failed to decimate the whole star.

Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA

#nasa #space #hubble #spothubble #universe #solarsystem #galaxy #supernova #exploded #star #irregular #beautiful #lightyears #discovery #exploration #telescope #astronomy #explosion #pictureoftheday #science


0

Glowing warmly against the dark backdrop of the universe, this irregular galaxy seen by our Hubble Space Telescope (@NASAHubble) contains bright pockets of star formation. Located approximately 70 million light-years away, it’s host to a particularly interesting exploded star, also known as a supernova.

In November 2008, 14-year-old Caroline Moore from New York discovered this supernova, which made her the youngest person at the time to have discovered one. Follow-up observations by professional astronomers showed that it was peculiarly interesting in many different ways.
First, its host galaxy rarely produces supernovae. It is also one of the faintest supernovae ever observed and after the explosion it expanded very slowly, suggesting that the explosion did not release copious amounts of energy as usually expected. Astronomers have now classified it as a subclass of a Type Ia supernova, which is the explosion of a white dwarf that hungrily accretes matter from a companion star. It may have may have been the result of a partially failed supernova, explaining why the explosion failed to decimate the whole star.

Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA

#nasa #space #hubble #spothubble #universe #solarsystem #galaxy #supernova #exploded #star #irregular #beautiful #lightyears #discovery #exploration #telescope #astronomy #explosion #pictureoftheday #science


0

#Repost @nasa
・・・
Glowing warmly against the dark backdrop of the universe, this irregular galaxy seen by our Hubble Space Telescope (@NASAHubble) contains bright pockets of star formation. Located approximately 70 million light-years away, it’s host to a particularly interesting exploded star, also known as a supernova.

In November 2008, 14-year-old Caroline Moore from New York discovered this supernova, which made her the youngest person at the time to have discovered one. Follow-up observations by professional astronomers showed that it was peculiarly interesting in many different ways.
First, its host galaxy rarely produces supernovae. It is also one of the faintest supernovae ever observed and after the explosion it expanded very slowly, suggesting that the explosion did not release copious amounts of energy as usually expected. Astronomers have now classified it as a subclass of a Type Ia supernova, which is the explosion of a white dwarf that hungrily accretes matter from a companion star. It may have may have been the result of a partially failed supernova, explaining why the explosion failed to decimate the whole star.

Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA

#nasa #space #hubble #spothubble #universe #solarsystem #galaxy #supernova #exploded #star #irregular #beautiful #lightyears #discovery #exploration #telescope #astronomy #explosion #pictureoftheday #science


0

Repost @nasa How did Uranus get tilted so much that it spins on its side? This question has made many a scientist wonder. New research looking back at the planet’s early formation points to a young proto-planet of rock and ice colliding with Uranus, causing its extreme tilt. Instead of rotating like a top spinning nearly upright, as Earth does, the planet “rolls” on its side as it circles the Sun.

While it is the butt of many jokes, Uranus is actually a fascinating world to study. It is about four times wider than Earth orbiting our Sun at a distance of about 1.8 billion miles (2.9 billion kilometers). Uranus takes about 17 hours to rotate once (a Uranian day), and about 84 Earth years to complete an orbit of the Sun (a Uranian year). Uranus has 27 known moons, and they are named after characters from the works of William Shakespeare and Alexander Pope. With 13 known rings, we've seen that the inner rings are narrow and dark and the outer rings are brightly colored.

This false-color image was generated by Erich Karkoschka using data taken on August 8, 1998, with the @NASAHubble Space Telescope's Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer.
Source: NASA/JPL/STScI
#nasa #space #solarsystem #uranus #hubble #picoftheday #colors #planet #planets #rings #spothubble #pictureoftheday


0

کهکشان نامنظم که توسط تلسکوپ فضایی هابل ترسیم شده، نزدیک به 70 میلیون سال نوری دورتر از زمین است.
در نوامبر 2008، کارولین مور، 14 ساله از نیویورک، این ابرنواختر را کشف کرد، که او را جوانترین فرد در آن زمان می دانستند.

#الله #خدا #علم #نجوم #فضا #nasa #god #earth#NASA #space #stellar #hubble #space #telescope #stars #nebula #astronomy #spothubble #solarsystem #universe #galaxy #pictureoftheday #beautiful #picoftheday #cosmicrays #lightyears


0

Glowing warmly against the dark backdrop of the universe, this irregular galaxy seen by our Hubble Space Telescope (@NASAHubble) contains bright pockets of star formation. Located approximately 70 million light-years away, it’s host to a particularly interesting exploded star, also known as a supernova.

In November 2008, 14-year-old Caroline Moore from New York discovered this supernova, which made her the youngest person at the time to have discovered one. Follow-up observations by professional astronomers showed that it was peculiarly interesting in many different ways.
First, its host galaxy rarely produces supernovae. It is also one of the faintest supernovae ever observed and after the explosion it expanded very slowly, suggesting that the explosion did not release copious amounts of energy as usually expected. Astronomers have now classified it as a subclass of a Type Ia supernova, which is the explosion of a white dwarf that hungrily accretes matter from a companion star. It may have may have been the result of a partially failed supernova, explaining why the explosion failed to decimate the whole star.

Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA

#nasa #space #hubble #spothubble #universe #solarsystem #galaxy #supernova #exploded #star #irregular #beautiful #lightyears #discovery #exploration #telescope #astronomy #explosion #pictureoftheday #science


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repost via @instarepost20 from @nasa Glowing warmly against the dark backdrop of the universe, this irregular galaxy seen by our Hubble Space Telescope (@NASAHubble) contains bright pockets of star formation. Located approximately 70 million light-years away, it’s host to a particularly interesting exploded star, also known as a supernova.

In November 2008, 14-year-old Caroline Moore from New York discovered this supernova, which made her the youngest person at the time to have discovered one. Follow-up observations by professional astronomers showed that it was peculiarly interesting in many different ways.
First, its host galaxy rarely produces supernovae. It is also one of the faintest supernovae ever observed and after the explosion it expanded very slowly, suggesting that the explosion did not release copious amounts of energy as usually expected. Astronomers have now classified it as a subclass of a Type Ia supernova, which is the explosion of a white dwarf that hungrily accretes matter from a companion star. It may have may have been the result of a partially failed supernova, explaining why the explosion failed to decimate the whole star.

Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA

#nasa #space #hubble #spothubble #universe #solarsystem #galaxy #supernova #exploded #star #irregular #beautiful #lightyears #discovery #exploration #telescope #astronomy #explosion #pictureoftheday #science


0

From @nasa
Glowing warmly against the dark backdrop of the universe, this irregular galaxy seen by our Hubble Space Telescope (@NASAHubble) contains bright pockets of star formation. Located approximately 70 million light-years away, it’s host to a particularly interesting exploded star, also known as a supernova.

In November 2008, 14-year-old Caroline Moore from New York discovered this supernova, which made her the youngest person at the time to have discovered one. Follow-up observations by professional astronomers showed that it was peculiarly interesting in many different ways.
First, its host galaxy rarely produces supernovae. It is also one of the faintest supernovae ever observed and after the explosion it expanded very slowly, suggesting that the explosion did not release copious amounts of energy as usually expected. Astronomers have now classified it as a subclass of a Type Ia supernova, which is the explosion of a white dwarf that hungrily accretes matter from a companion star. It may have may have been the result of a partially failed supernova, explaining why the explosion failed to decimate the whole star.

Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA

#nasa #space #hubble #spothubble #universe #solarsystem #galaxy #supernova #exploded #star #irregular #beautiful #lightyears #discovery #exploration #telescope #astronomy #explosion #pictureoftheday #science


0

#Repost @nasa with @get_repost
・・・
Glowing warmly against the dark backdrop of the universe, this irregular galaxy seen by our Hubble Space Telescope (@NASAHubble) contains bright pockets of star formation. Located approximately 70 million light-years away, it’s host to a particularly interesting exploded star, also known as a supernova.

In November 2008, 14-year-old Caroline Moore from New York discovered this supernova, which made her the youngest person at the time to have discovered one. Follow-up observations by professional astronomers showed that it was peculiarly interesting in many different ways.
First, its host galaxy rarely produces supernovae. It is also one of the faintest supernovae ever observed and after the explosion it expanded very slowly, suggesting that the explosion did not release copious amounts of energy as usually expected. Astronomers have now classified it as a subclass of a Type Ia supernova, which is the explosion of a white dwarf that hungrily accretes matter from a companion star. It may have may have been the result of a partially failed supernova, explaining why the explosion failed to decimate the whole star.

Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA

#nasa #space #hubble #spothubble #universe #solarsystem #galaxy #supernova #exploded #star #irregular #beautiful #lightyears #discovery #exploration #telescope #astronomy #explosion #pictureoftheday #science


2

#Repost @nasa (@get_repost)
・・・
Glowing warmly against the dark backdrop of the universe, this irregular galaxy seen by our Hubble Space Telescope (@NASAHubble) contains bright pockets of star formation. Located approximately 70 million light-years away, it’s host to a particularly interesting exploded star, also known as a supernova.

In November 2008, 14-year-old Caroline Moore from New York discovered this supernova, which made her the youngest person at the time to have discovered one. Follow-up observations by professional astronomers showed that it was peculiarly interesting in many different ways.
First, its host galaxy rarely produces supernovae. It is also one of the faintest supernovae ever observed and after the explosion it expanded very slowly, suggesting that the explosion did not release copious amounts of energy as usually expected. Astronomers have now classified it as a subclass of a Type Ia supernova, which is the explosion of a white dwarf that hungrily accretes matter from a companion star. It may have may have been the result of a partially failed supernova, explaining why the explosion failed to decimate the whole star.

Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA

#nasa #space #hubble #spothubble #universe #solarsystem #galaxy #supernova #exploded #star #irregular #beautiful #lightyears #discovery #exploration #telescope #astronomy #explosion #pictureoftheday #science


1

Glowing warmly against the dark backdrop of the universe, this irregular galaxy seen by our Hubble Space Telescope (@NASAHubble) contains bright pockets of star formation. Located approximately 70 million light-years away, it’s host to a particularly interesting exploded star, also known as a supernova.

In November 2008, 14-year-old Caroline Moore from New York discovered this supernova, which made her the youngest person at the time to have discovered one. Follow-up observations by professional astronomers showed that it was peculiarly interesting in many different ways.
First, its host galaxy rarely produces supernovae. It is also one of the faintest supernovae ever observed and after the explosion it expanded very slowly, suggesting that the explosion did not release copious amounts of energy as usually expected. Astronomers have now classified it as a subclass of a Type Ia supernova, which is the explosion of a white dwarf that hungrily accretes matter from a companion star. It may have may have been the result of a partially failed supernova, explaining why the explosion failed to decimate the whole star.

Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA

#nasa #space #hubble #spothubble #universe #solarsystem #galaxy #supernova #exploded #star #irregular #beautiful #lightyears #discovery #exploration #telescope #astronomy #explosion #pictureoftheday #science


1

💙 “Not just beautiful, though--the stars are like the trees in the forest, alive and breathing. And they're watching me.”- Haruki Murakami, Kafka on the Shore ✨💫✨🌌 #Repost @nasa
・・・
Glowing warmly against the dark backdrop of the universe, this irregular galaxy seen by our Hubble Space Telescope (@NASAHubble) contains bright pockets of star formation. Located approximately 70 million light-years away, it’s host to a particularly interesting exploded star, also known as a supernova.

In November 2008, 14-year-old Caroline Moore from New York discovered this supernova, which made her the youngest person at the time to have discovered one. Follow-up observations by professional astronomers showed that it was peculiarly interesting in many different ways.
First, its host galaxy rarely produces supernovae. It is also one of the faintest supernovae ever observed and after the explosion it expanded very slowly, suggesting that the explosion did not release copious amounts of energy as usually expected. Astronomers have now classified it as a subclass of a Type Ia supernova, which is the explosion of a white dwarf that hungrily accretes matter from a companion star. It may have may have been the result of a partially failed supernova, explaining why the explosion failed to decimate the whole star.

Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA

#nasa #space #hubble #spothubble #universe #solarsystem #galaxy #supernova #exploded #star #irregular #beautiful #lightyears #discovery #exploration #telescope #astronomy #explosion #pictureoftheday #science


2

Regrann from @nasa - Glowing warmly against the dark backdrop of the universe, this irregular galaxy seen by our Hubble Space Telescope (@NASAHubble) contains bright pockets of star formation. Located approximately 70 million light-years away, it’s host to a particularly interesting exploded star, also known as a supernova.

In November 2008, 14-year-old Caroline Moore from New York discovered this supernova, which made her the youngest person at the time to have discovered one. Follow-up observations by professional astronomers showed that it was peculiarly interesting in many different ways.
First, its host galaxy rarely produces supernovae. It is also one of the faintest supernovae ever observed and after the explosion it expanded very slowly, suggesting that the explosion did not release copious amounts of energy as usually expected. Astronomers have now classified it as a subclass of a Type Ia supernova, which is the explosion of a white dwarf that hungrily accretes matter from a companion star. It may have may have been the result of a partially failed supernova, explaining why the explosion failed to decimate the whole star.

Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA

#nasa #space #hubble #spothubble #universe #solarsystem #galaxy #supernova #exploded #star #irregular #beautiful #lightyears #discovery #exploration #telescope #astronomy #explosion #pictureoftheday #science - #regrann


0

Glowing warmly against the dark backdrop of the universe, this irregular galaxy seen by our Hubble Space Telescope (@NASAHubble) contains bright pockets of star formation. Located approximately 70 million light-years away, it’s host to a particularly interesting exploded star, also known as a supernova.

In November 2008, 14-year-old Caroline Moore from New York discovered this supernova, which made her the youngest person at the time to have discovered one. Follow-up observations by professional astronomers showed that it was peculiarly interesting in many different ways.
First, its host galaxy rarely produces supernovae. It is also one of the faintest supernovae ever observed and after the explosion it expanded very slowly, suggesting that the explosion did not release copious amounts of energy as usually expected. Astronomers have now classified it as a subclass of a Type Ia supernova, which is the explosion of a white dwarf that hungrily accretes matter from a companion star. It may have may have been the result of a partially failed supernova, explaining why the explosion failed to decimate the whole star.

Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA

#nasa #space #hubble #spothubble #universe #solarsystem #galaxy #supernova #exploded #star #irregular #beautiful #lightyears #discovery #exploration #telescope #astronomy #explosion #pictureoftheday #science


1,630

خب،این کلیپ حیرت انگیز قطعا ارزش چندین بار دیدن رو داره
چندتا از اجرام موجود در کهکشان راه شیری از جمله(سیارات منظومه ما و همچنین ستارگان درخشان آسمان) که از لحاظ اندازه بصورت تصویری با هم مقایسه شدن.
و عرض کنم که تمامی اجرامی که مشاهده می‌کنید مربوط به کهکشان خودمون هستن.
اجرام مورد مشاهده به ترتیب:
ماه،عطارد،مریخ،ناهید،زمین،نپتون،زحل،مشتری
و بعد از اون
خورشید و باقی ستارگان به ترتیب:
ستاره شعرای یمانی(پر نور ترین ستاره آسمان شب(بصورت ظاهری))
ستاره ی پولوکس،سماک رامح،الدبران،رجل الجبار،
بعد از اون ستاره ی تپانچه(پیستول) که پر جرم ترین ستاره کهکشان ماست و در آخر ستاذه قنطورس آ، که بعد از خورشید نزدیکترین ستاره به ماست.
امیدوارم حتی چند ثانیه شمارو به فکر کردن به عظمت کیهان و کوچک بودن ما فرو ببره.
وقت بخیر

عا دل

سری بزنید به @astronomy_hub

#nasa #space #hubble #spothubble #telescope #galaxy #milkyway #spiral #universe #solarsystem #astronomy #stars #formation #science #supernovae #lightyears @nasa @nasahubble #نجوم #کیهان #کهکشان @shahab_0din @arman_kh_t


3

تعداد روزهای سال در سیارات مختلف...... Some where so long , and so short somewhere....... #الله #خدا #علم #نجوم #فضا #nasa #god #earth#NASA #space #stellar #hubble #space #telescope #stars #nebula #astronomy #spothubble #solarsystem #universe #galaxy #pictureoftheday #beautiful #picoftheday #cosmicrays #lightyears


1

Regrann from @nasa - How did Uranus get tilted so much that it spins on its side? This question has made many a scientist wonder. New research looking back at the planet’s early formation points to a young proto-planet of rock and ice colliding with Uranus, causing its extreme tilt. Instead of rotating like a top spinning nearly upright, as Earth does, the planet “rolls” on its side as it circles the Sun.

While it is the butt of many jokes, Uranus is actually a fascinating world to study. It is about four times wider than Earth orbiting our Sun at a distance of about 1.8 billion miles (2.9 billion kilometers). Uranus takes about 17 hours to rotate once (a Uranian day), and about 84 Earth years to complete an orbit of the Sun (a Uranian year). Uranus has 27 known moons, and they are named after characters from the works of William Shakespeare and Alexander Pope. With 13 known rings, we've seen that the inner rings are narrow and dark and the outer rings are brightly colored.

This false-color image was generated by Erich Karkoschka using data taken on August 8, 1998, with the @NASAHubble Space Telescope's Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer.
Source: NASA/JPL/STScI
#nasa #space #solarsystem #uranus #hubble #picoftheday #colors #planet #planets #rings #spothubble #pictureoftheday - #regrann


2

Chock-full of star formation, this spiral galaxy contains the mass of around ten billion suns – while this may sound like a lot, it is over 20 times less massive than our own Milky Way.

Roughly 50 million light-years away, this galaxy seen by our Hubble Space Telescope (@NASAHubble) is receding from us at a speed of about 808 miles per second (1,300 kilometers per second). Although it appears in the sky near one of our closest galaxy neighbors, the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), this is just a trick of perspective. In reality, this galaxy is physically nowhere near the LMC in space — in fact, it truly is a loner, lacking the company of any nearby galaxies or membership of any galaxy cluster.

Despite its lack of cosmic companions, when this lonely galaxy has a telescope pointed in its direction, it puts on quite a show. It has hosted a variety of spectacular exploding stars called supernovae, four of which we have observed. This galaxy may be alone in space, but we are watching and admiring from far away.

Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA

#nasa #space #hubble #spothubble #telescope #galaxy #milkyway #spiral #universe #solarsystem #astronomy #stars #formation #science #supernovae #lightyears


5

How did Uranus get tilted so much that it spins on its side? This question has made many a scientist wonder. New research looking back at the planet’s early formation points to a young proto-planet of rock and ice colliding with Uranus, causing its extreme tilt. Instead of rotating like a top spinning nearly upright, as Earth does, the planet “rolls” on its side as it circles the Sun.
While it is the butt of many jokes, Uranus is actually a fascinating world to study. It is about four times wider than Earth orbiting our Sun at a distance of about 1.8 billion miles (2.9 billion kilometers). Uranus takes about 17 hours to rotate once (a Uranian day), and about 84 Earth years to complete an orbit of the Sun (a Uranian year). Uranus has 27 known moons, and they are named after characters from the works of William Shakespeare and Alexander Pope. With 13 known rings, we've seen that the inner rings are narrow and dark and the outer rings are brightly colored.
This false-color image was generated by Erich Karkoschka using data taken on August 8, 1998, with the @NASAHubble Space Telescope's Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer.
Source: NASA/JPL/STScI
#nasa #space #solarsystem #uranus #hubble #picoftheday #colors #planet #planets #rings #spothubble #pictureoftheday


0

“Pardon Me!”…This supermassive black hole, billions of times the mass of our Sun, was caught by our Chandra X-Ray Observatory doing some cosmic snacking then "burping" 🗣️— twice!
This image shows the galaxy, in a composite image with data from Chandra (purple), and the Hubble Space Telescope (@NASAHubble) (red, green and blue). Chandra detected a bright, point-like source of X-ray emission from the galaxy, a telltale sign of the presence of a supermassive black hole millions or billions of times more massive than our sun. The X-rays are produced by gas heated to millions of degrees by the enormous gravitational and magnetic forces near the black hole. Some of this gas will fall into the black hole, while a portion will be expelled in a powerful outflow of high-energy particles.
By comparing images from Chandra and Hubble, the team determined that the black hole is located in the center of the galaxy, the expected location for such an object. The X-ray data also provide evidence that the supermassive black hole is embedded in a heavy veil of dust and gas.
Credit: X-ray NASA/CXC/University of Colorado/J. Comerford et al.; Optical: NASA/STScI
#nasa #space #hubble #spothubble #chandra #xray #visible #light #blackhole #observatory #billions #sun #universe #galaxies #supermassive #data #science #beautiful #pictureoftheday


0

#Repost @nasa (@get_repost)
・・・
How did Uranus get tilted so much that it spins on its side? This question has made many a scientist wonder. New research looking back at the planet’s early formation points to a young proto-planet of rock and ice colliding with Uranus, causing its extreme tilt. Instead of rotating like a top spinning nearly upright, as Earth does, the planet “rolls” on its side as it circles the Sun.

While it is the butt of many jokes, Uranus is actually a fascinating world to study. It is about four times wider than Earth orbiting our Sun at a distance of about 1.8 billion miles (2.9 billion kilometers). Uranus takes about 17 hours to rotate once (a Uranian day), and about 84 Earth years to complete an orbit of the Sun (a Uranian year). Uranus has 27 known moons, and they are named after characters from the works of William Shakespeare and Alexander Pope. With 13 known rings, we've seen that the inner rings are narrow and dark and the outer rings are brightly colored.

This false-color image was generated by Erich Karkoschka using data taken on August 8, 1998, with the @NASAHubble Space Telescope's Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer.
Source: NASA/JPL/STScI
#nasa #space #solarsystem #uranus #hubble #picoftheday #colors #planet #planets #rings #spothubble #pictureoftheday


2

#Repost @nasa (@get_repost)
・・・
How did Uranus get tilted so much that it spins on its side? This question has made many a scientist wonder. New research looking back at the planet’s early formation points to a young proto-planet of rock and ice colliding with Uranus, causing its extreme tilt. Instead of rotating like a top spinning nearly upright, as Earth does, the planet “rolls” on its side as it circles the Sun.

While it is the butt of many jokes, Uranus is actually a fascinating world to study. It is about four times wider than Earth orbiting our Sun at a distance of about 1.8 billion miles (2.9 billion kilometers). Uranus takes about 17 hours to rotate once (a Uranian day), and about 84 Earth years to complete an orbit of the Sun (a Uranian year). Uranus has 27 known moons, and they are named after characters from the works of William Shakespeare and Alexander Pope. With 13 known rings, we've seen that the inner rings are narrow and dark and the outer rings are brightly colored.

This false-color image was generated by Erich Karkoschka using data taken on August 8, 1998, with the @NASAHubble Space Telescope's Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer.
Source: NASA/JPL/STScI
#nasa #space #solarsystem #uranus #hubble #picoftheday #colors #planet #planets #rings #spothubble #pictureoftheday


0

امشب همگی دوستان عزیزم رو با دیدن این تایم لپس فوق العاده زیبا و چشم نواز از حرکت کهکشان راه شیری در آسمان(که البته به دلیل چرخش زمین این اتفاق میفته) به آرامش دعوت می‌کنم.
ببینید و برای دوستان خودتون هم به اشتراک بذارید،صفحه من بازه.
شبتون خوش
۲۲/۰۴/۹۷
عا دل

سری بزنید به @astronomy_hub

#nasa #space #hubble #spothubble #telescope #galaxy #milkyway #spiral #universe #solarsystem #astronomy #stars #formation #science #supernovae #lightyears @nasa @nasahubble #نجوم #کیهان #کهکشان @shahab_0din @arman_kh_t


6

#Repost @nasa with @get_repost
・・・
How did Uranus get tilted so much that it spins on its side? This question has made many a scientist wonder. New research looking back at the planet’s early formation points to a young proto-planet of rock and ice colliding with Uranus, causing its extreme tilt. Instead of rotating like a top spinning nearly upright, as Earth does, the planet “rolls” on its side as it circles the Sun.

While it is the butt of many jokes, Uranus is actually a fascinating world to study. It is about four times wider than Earth orbiting our Sun at a distance of about 1.8 billion miles (2.9 billion kilometers). Uranus takes about 17 hours to rotate once (a Uranian day), and about 84 Earth years to complete an orbit of the Sun (a Uranian year). Uranus has 27 known moons, and they are named after characters from the works of William Shakespeare and Alexander Pope. With 13 known rings, we've seen that the inner rings are narrow and dark and the outer rings are brightly colored.

This false-color image was generated by Erich Karkoschka using data taken on August 8, 1998, with the @NASAHubble Space Telescope's Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer.
Source: NASA/JPL/STScI
#nasa #space #solarsystem #uranus #hubble #picoftheday #colors #planet #planets #rings #spothubble #pictureoftheday


0

#Repost @nasa
・・・
How did Uranus get tilted so much that it spins on its side? This question has made many a scientist wonder. New research looking back at the planet’s early formation points to a young proto-planet of rock and ice colliding with Uranus, causing its extreme tilt. Instead of rotating like a top spinning nearly upright, as Earth does, the planet “rolls” on its side as it circles the Sun.

While it is the butt of many jokes, Uranus is actually a fascinating world to study. It is about four times wider than Earth orbiting our Sun at a distance of about 1.8 billion miles (2.9 billion kilometers). Uranus takes about 17 hours to rotate once (a Uranian day), and about 84 Earth years to complete an orbit of the Sun (a Uranian year). Uranus has 27 known moons, and they are named after characters from the works of William Shakespeare and Alexander Pope. With 13 known rings, we've seen that the inner rings are narrow and dark and the outer rings are brightly colored.

This false-color image was generated by Erich Karkoschka using data taken on August 8, 1998, with the @NASAHubble Space Telescope's Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer.
Source: NASA/JPL/STScI
#nasa #space #solarsystem #uranus #hubble #picoftheday #colors #planet #planets #rings #spothubble #pictureoftheday


0

#Repost @nasa with @get_repost
・・・
How did Uranus get tilted so much that it spins on its side? This question has made many a scientist wonder. New research looking back at the planet’s early formation points to a young proto-planet of rock and ice colliding with Uranus, causing its extreme tilt. Instead of rotating like a top spinning nearly upright, as Earth does, the planet “rolls” on its side as it circles the Sun.

While it is the butt of many jokes, Uranus is actually a fascinating world to study. It is about four times wider than Earth orbiting our Sun at a distance of about 1.8 billion miles (2.9 billion kilometers). Uranus takes about 17 hours to rotate once (a Uranian day), and about 84 Earth years to complete an orbit of the Sun (a Uranian year). Uranus has 27 known moons, and they are named after characters from the works of William Shakespeare and Alexander Pope. With 13 known rings, we've seen that the inner rings are narrow and dark and the outer rings are brightly colored.

This false-color image was generated by Erich Karkoschka using data taken on August 8, 1998, with the @NASAHubble Space Telescope's Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer.
Source: NASA/JPL/STScI
#nasa #space #solarsystem #uranus #hubble #picoftheday #colors #planet #planets #rings #spothubble #pictureoftheday


1

Twinkle, twinkle, many stars! ⭐️ Spotted by our @NASAHubble telescope roughly in the direction of the center of the Milky Way, is this gravitationally bound collection of stars, also known as a globular cluster. Globular clusters contain hundreds of thousands of stars that are thought to have formed at roughly the same time.

Studies have shown that the globular cluster seen here is home to an aging population of stars. Most globular clusters orbiting the Milky Way are estimated to be over 10 billion years old; as a result, they contain some of the oldest stars in our galaxy, formed very early in the galaxy’s history. However, their role in galactic evolution is still a matter of study.

Credit: NASA/ESA/Hubble

#nasa #hubble #stars #stargazing #space #astronomy #spothubble #solarsystem #universe #galaxy #science #pictureoftheday #beautiful #light #picoftheday


1

Hace mucho que no comparto cosas chulas de la #NASA, esto p.ej. es un flipe... Y por cierto, sabíais que Urano también tiene anillos, aunque no tan 'tochos' como los de Saturno? 🌀🌀🌀 #Repost @nasa (@get_repost)
・・・
How did Uranus get tilted so much that it spins on its side? This question has made many a scientist wonder. New research looking back at the planet’s early formation points to a young proto-planet of rock and ice colliding with Uranus, causing its extreme tilt. Instead of rotating like a top spinning nearly upright, as Earth does, the planet “rolls” on its side as it circles the Sun.

While it is the butt of many jokes, Uranus is actually a fascinating world to study. It is about four times wider than Earth orbiting our Sun at a distance of about 1.8 billion miles (2.9 billion kilometers). Uranus takes about 17 hours to rotate once (a Uranian day), and about 84 Earth years to complete an orbit of the Sun (a Uranian year). Uranus has 27 known moons, and they are named after characters from the works of William Shakespeare and Alexander Pope. With 13 known rings, we've seen that the inner rings are narrow and dark and the outer rings are brightly colored.

This false-color image was generated by Erich Karkoschka using data taken on August 8, 1998, with the @NASAHubble Space Telescope's Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer.
Source: NASA/JPL/STScI
#nasa #space #solarsystem #uranus #hubble #picoftheday #colors #planet #planets #rings #spothubble #pictureoftheday


0

Millions AND billions! This enormous galaxy cluster, seen by our Hubble Space Telescope (@NASAHubble), contains the mass of a staggering three million billion suns! Nicknamed “El Gordo” (“the Fat One” in Spanish), it is the largest, hottest and brightest X-ray galaxy ever discovered in the distant Universe.
Galaxy clusters are the largest objects in the Universe that are bound together by gravity. They form over billions of years as smaller groups of galaxies slowly come together. In 2012, observations showed that El Gordo is actually composed of two galaxy clusters colliding at millions of kilometers per hour.
The formation of galaxy clusters depends heavily on dark matter and dark energy; studying such clusters can therefore help shed light on these elusive phenomena. In 2014, Hubble found that most of El Gordo’s mass is concealed in the form of dark matter. Evidence suggests that El Gordo’s “normal” matter — largely composed of hot gas that is bright in the X-ray wavelength domain — is being torn from the dark matter in the collision. The hot gas is slowing down, while the dark matter is not.
Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA, RELICS
#nasa #space #hubble #spothubble #galaxy #cluster #galaxycluster #milliion #billion #telescope #elgordo #observe #science #discover #darkmatter #universe #astrophysics #solarsystem #light #beautiful #pictureoftheday


1

#Repost @nasa
・・・
How did Uranus get tilted so much that it spins on its side? This question has made many a scientist wonder. New research looking back at the planet’s early formation points to a young proto-planet of rock and ice colliding with Uranus, causing its extreme tilt. Instead of rotating like a top spinning nearly upright, as Earth does, the planet “rolls” on its side as it circles the Sun.

While it is the butt of many jokes, Uranus is actually a fascinating world to study. It is about four times wider than Earth orbiting our Sun at a distance of about 1.8 billion miles (2.9 billion kilometers). Uranus takes about 17 hours to rotate once (a Uranian day), and about 84 Earth years to complete an orbit of the Sun (a Uranian year). Uranus has 27 known moons, and they are named after characters from the works of William Shakespeare and Alexander Pope. With 13 known rings, we've seen that the inner rings are narrow and dark and the outer rings are brightly colored.

This false-color image was generated by Erich Karkoschka using data taken on August 8, 1998, with the @NASAHubble Space Telescope's Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer.
Source: NASA/JPL/STScI
#nasa #space #solarsystem #uranus #hubble #picoftheday #colors #planet #planets #rings #spothubble #pictureoftheday


1

Fun facts about #uranus #Repost @nasa
・・・
How did Uranus get tilted so much that it spins on its side? This question has made many a scientist wonder. New research looking back at the planet’s early formation points to a young proto-planet of rock and ice colliding with Uranus, causing its extreme tilt. Instead of rotating like a top spinning nearly upright, as Earth does, the planet “rolls” on its side as it circles the Sun.

While it is the butt of many jokes, Uranus is actually a fascinating world to study. It is about four times wider than Earth orbiting our Sun at a distance of about 1.8 billion miles (2.9 billion kilometers). Uranus takes about 17 hours to rotate once (a Uranian day), and about 84 Earth years to complete an orbit of the Sun (a Uranian year). Uranus has 27 known moons, and they are named after characters from the works of William Shakespeare and Alexander Pope. With 13 known rings, we've seen that the inner rings are narrow and dark and the outer rings are brightly colored.

This false-color image was generated by Erich Karkoschka using data taken on August 8, 1998, with the @NASAHubble Space Telescope's Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer.
Source: NASA/JPL/STScI
#nasa #space #solarsystem #uranus #hubble #picoftheday #colors #planet #planets #rings #spothubble #pictureoftheday


5

#FastRepost from @nasa by @fastrepost_app
•••
How did Uranus get tilted so much that it spins on its side? This question has made many a scientist wonder. New research looking back at the planet’s early formation points to a young proto-planet of rock and ice colliding with Uranus, causing its extreme tilt. Instead of rotating like a top spinning nearly upright, as Earth does, the planet “rolls” on its side as it circles the Sun.

While it is the butt of many jokes, Uranus is actually a fascinating world to study. It is about four times wider than Earth orbiting our Sun at a distance of about 1.8 billion miles (2.9 billion kilometers). Uranus takes about 17 hours to rotate once (a Uranian day), and about 84 Earth years to complete an orbit of the Sun (a Uranian year). Uranus has 27 known moons, and they are named after characters from the works of William Shakespeare and Alexander Pope. With 13 known rings, we've seen that the inner rings are narrow and dark and the outer rings are brightly colored.

This false-color image was generated by Erich Karkoschka using data taken on August 8, 1998, with the @NASAHubble Space Telescope's Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer.
Source: NASA/JPL/STScI
#nasa #space #solarsystem #uranus #hubble #picoftheday #colors #planet #planets #rings #spothubble #pictureoftheday


0

#Repost @nasa with @get_repost
・・・
Behold: see galaxies like never before! Astronomers have used the unparalleled sharpness & spectral range of the Hubble Space Telescope (@NASAHubble) to create the most comprehensive, high-resolution ultraviolet-light look at nearby star-forming galaxies.
The researchers combined new Hubble observations with archival Hubble images for 50 star-forming spiral and dwarf galaxies in the local universe, offering a large and extensive resource for understanding the complexities of star formation and galaxy evolution. The project, called the Legacy ExtraGalactic UV Survey (LEGUS), has amassed star catalogs for each of the LEGUS galaxies and cluster catalogs for 30 of the galaxies, as well as images of the galaxies themselves. The data provide detailed information on young, massive stars and star clusters, and how their environment affects their development.

Seen here is a look at one of the galaxies included in the LEGUS survey. It is a spiral galaxy located in the Canes Venatici constellation about 20 million light-years away from Earth.
Image credit: NASA, ESA, and the LEGUS team
#nasa #space #hubble #spothubble #telescope #galaxy #lightyears #beautiful #pictureoftheday #science #astronomy #pretty #legus


0

#Repost @nasa (@get_repost)
・・・
How did Uranus get tilted so much that it spins on its side? This question has made many a scientist wonder. New research looking back at the planet’s early formation points to a young proto-planet of rock and ice colliding with Uranus, causing its extreme tilt. Instead of rotating like a top spinning nearly upright, as Earth does, the planet “rolls” on its side as it circles the Sun.

While it is the butt of many jokes, Uranus is actually a fascinating world to study. It is about four times wider than Earth orbiting our Sun at a distance of about 1.8 billion miles (2.9 billion kilometers). Uranus takes about 17 hours to rotate once (a Uranian day), and about 84 Earth years to complete an orbit of the Sun (a Uranian year). Uranus has 27 known moons, and they are named after characters from the works of William Shakespeare and Alexander Pope. With 13 known rings, we've seen that the inner rings are narrow and dark and the outer rings are brightly colored.

This false-color image was generated by Erich Karkoschka using data taken on August 8, 1998, with the @NASAHubble Space Telescope's Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer.
Source: NASA/JPL/STScI
#nasa #space #solarsystem #uranus #hubble #picoftheday #colors #planet #planets #rings #spothubble #pictureoftheday


0

.
🔴بزرگترین طوفان شن را در نظر بگیرید
🔵 #کهکشان ما تنها دانه شنی از آن طوفان است
🔵و این طوفان خود دانه شنی در طوفانی بزرگتر است
🔵و این طوفان بزرگتر خود دانه ای شن در طوفانی بزرگتر است
🔴فکر اینکه ما تنها موجودات #جهان هستی باشیم فکر احمقانه ایست مانند این است که تصور کنیم ما تنها فرزندی هستیم که احتمال زاییده شدنش از جانب مادرمان وجود داشت. .

#الله #خدا #علم #نجوم #فضا #nasa #god #earth#NASA #space #stellar #hubble #space #telescope #stars #nebula #astronomy #spothubble #solarsystem #universe #galaxy #pictureoftheday #beautiful #picoftheday #cosmicrays #lightyears
جواب سوال شما!😊
@Tavahom_elhad


2

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طلوع #ماه را از افق #زمین ببینید
.
فضانوردان ایستگاه فضایی بین‌المللی روزانه تصاویر زیبایی را از فضا و زمین ثبت می‌کنند و این بار، ماه را در آسمان شب هدف قرار داده‌اند.

#کیت_رابینز ، #فضانورد #ناسا تاکنون تصاویر زیادی از زمین و زیبایی‌های آن ثبت کرده است. وی به تازگی تصویر خارق‌العاده‌ای از طلوع ماه را در افق زمین ارسال کرده است.

#الله #خدا #علم #نجوم #فضا #nasa #god #earth#NASA #space #stellar #hubble #space #telescope #stars #nebula #astronomy #spothubble #solarsystem #universe #galaxy #pictureoftheday #beautiful #picoftheday #cosmicrays #lightyears


1

#Repost @nasa with @get_repost
・・・
A new study using data from our NuSTAR space telescope suggests that Eta Carinae, the most luminous and massive stellar system within 10,000 light-years, is accelerating particles to high energies — some of which may reach Earth as cosmic rays, subatomic particles from outside our planet’s atmosphere.
Eta Carinae's great eruption in the 1840s created the billowing Homunculus Nebula, imaged here by our Hubble Space Telescope (@nasahubble). Now about a light-year long, the expanding cloud contains enough material to make at least 10 copies of our Sun. Astronomers cannot yet explain what caused this eruption.
Credit: NASA/@EuropeanSpaceAgency/@NASAHubble/SM4 ERO Team

#NASA #space #stellar #hubble #space #telescope #stars #nebula #astronomy #spothubble #solarsystem #universe #galaxy #pictureoftheday #beautiful #picoftheday #cosmicrays #lightyears


0

Who made this? Question .
.
.
#Repost @nasa
・・・
How did Uranus get tilted so much that it spins on its side? This question has made many a scientist wonder. New research looking back at the planet’s early formation points to a young proto-planet of rock and ice colliding with Uranus, causing its extreme tilt. Instead of rotating like a top spinning nearly upright, as Earth does, the planet “rolls” on its side as it circles the Sun.

While it is the butt of many jokes, Uranus is actually a fascinating world to study. It is about four times wider than Earth orbiting our Sun at a distance of about 1.8 billion miles (2.9 billion kilometers). Uranus takes about 17 hours to rotate once (a Uranian day), and about 84 Earth years to complete an orbit of the Sun (a Uranian year). Uranus has 27 known moons, and they are named after characters from the works of William Shakespeare and Alexander Pope. With 13 known rings, we've seen that the inner rings are narrow and dark and the outer rings are brightly colored.

This false-color image was generated by Erich Karkoschka using data taken on August 8, 1998, with the @NASAHubble Space Telescope's Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer.
Source: NASA/JPL/STScI
#nasa #space #solarsystem #uranus #hubble #picoftheday #colors #planet #planets #rings #spothubble #pictureoftheday


10

Rightfully named the Cartwheel Galaxy, this celestial object’s shape is a result of a violent galactic collision. A smaller galaxy has passed right through a large disk galaxy and produced shock waves that swept up gas and dust, much like ripples produced when a stone is dropped into a lake. Intense areas of star formation were sparked up, seen here in blue by our Hubble Space Telescope (@NASAHubble). The outermost ring of the galaxy, which is 1.5 times the size of our Milky Way, marks the shock wave’s leading edge. This object is one of the most dramatic examples of the small class of ring galaxies. This image is based on earlier Hubble data of the Cartwheel Galaxy that was reprocessed in 2010, bringing out more detail in the image than seen before.
Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA
#nasa #space #hubble #spothubble #galaxy #violent #collision #galactic #universe #solarsystem #cartwheel #star #formation #beautiful #pictureoftheday #science #telescope


3

#Repost from @nasa. How did Uranus get tilted so much that it spins on its side? This question has made many a scientist wonder. New research looking back at the planet’s early formation points to a young proto-planet of rock and ice colliding with Uranus, causing its extreme tilt. Instead of rotating like a top spinning nearly upright, as Earth does, the planet “rolls” on its side as it circles the Sun.

While it is the butt of many jokes, Uranus is actually a fascinating world to study. It is about four times wider than Earth orbiting our Sun at a distance of about 1.8 billion miles (2.9 billion kilometers). Uranus takes about 17 hours to rotate once (a Uranian day), and about 84 Earth years to complete an orbit of the Sun (a Uranian year). Uranus has 27 known moons, and they are named after characters from the works of William Shakespeare and Alexander Pope. With 13 known rings, we've seen that the inner rings are narrow and dark and the outer rings are brightly colored.

This false-color image was generated by Erich Karkoschka using data taken on August 8, 1998, with the @NASAHubble Space Telescope's Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer.
Source: NASA/JPL/STScI
#nasa #space #solarsystem #uranus #hubble #picoftheday #colors #planet #planets #rings #spothubble #pictureoftheday #RG #Regram #Уран #планета #солнечная_система


0

How did Uranus get tilted so much that it spins on its side? This question has made many a scientist wonder. New research looking back at the planet’s early formation points to a young proto-planet of rock and ice colliding with Uranus, causing its extreme tilt. Instead of rotating like a top spinning nearly upright, as Earth does, the planet “rolls” on its side as it circles the Sun.

While it is the butt of many jokes, Uranus is actually a fascinating world to study. It is about four times wider than Earth orbiting our Sun at a distance of about 1.8 billion miles (2.9 billion kilometers). Uranus takes about 17 hours to rotate once (a Uranian day), and about 84 Earth years to complete an orbit of the Sun (a Uranian year). Uranus has 27 known moons, and they are named after characters from the works of William Shakespeare and Alexander Pope. With 13 known rings, we've seen that the inner rings are narrow and dark and the outer rings are brightly colored.

This false-color image was generated by Erich Karkoschka using data taken on August 8, 1998, with the @NASAHubble Space Telescope's Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer.
Source: NASA/JPL/STScI
#nasa #space #solarsystem #uranus #hubble #picoftheday #colors #planet #planets #rings #spothubble #pictureoftheday


1

How did Uranus get tilted so much that it spins on its side? This question has made many a scientist wonder. New research looking back at the planet’s early formation points to a young proto-planet of rock and ice colliding with Uranus, causing its extreme tilt. Instead of rotating like a top spinning nearly upright, as Earth does, the planet “rolls” on its side as it circles the Sun.

While it is the butt of many jokes, Uranus is actually a fascinating world to study. It is about four times wider than Earth orbiting our Sun at a distance of about 1.8 billion miles (2.9 billion kilometers). Uranus takes about 17 hours to rotate once (a Uranian day), and about 84 Earth years to complete an orbit of the Sun (a Uranian year). Uranus has 27 known moons, and they are named after characters from the works of William Shakespeare and Alexander Pope. With 13 known rings, we've seen that the inner rings are narrow and dark and the outer rings are brightly colored.

This false-color image was generated by Erich Karkoschka using data taken on August 8, 1998, with the @NASAHubble Space Telescope's Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer.
Source: NASA/JPL/STScI
#nasa #space #solarsystem #uranus #hubble #picoftheday #colors #planet #planets #rings #spothubble #pictureoftheday


5

#Repost @nasa (@get_repost)
・・・
How did Uranus get tilted so much that it spins on its side? This question has made many a scientist wonder. New research looking back at the planet’s early formation points to a young proto-planet of rock and ice colliding with Uranus, causing its extreme tilt. Instead of rotating like a top spinning nearly upright, as Earth does, the planet “rolls” on its side as it circles the Sun.

While it is the butt of many jokes, Uranus is actually a fascinating world to study. It is about four times wider than Earth orbiting our Sun at a distance of about 1.8 billion miles (2.9 billion kilometers). Uranus takes about 17 hours to rotate once (a Uranian day), and about 84 Earth years to complete an orbit of the Sun (a Uranian year). Uranus has 27 known moons, and they are named after characters from the works of William Shakespeare and Alexander Pope. With 13 known rings, we've seen that the inner rings are narrow and dark and the outer rings are brightly colored.

This false-color image was generated by Erich Karkoschka using data taken on August 8, 1998, with the @NASAHubble Space Telescope's Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer.
Source: NASA/JPL/STScI
#nasa #space #solarsystem #uranus #hubble #picoftheday #colors #planet #planets #rings #spothubble #pictureoftheday


4

Regrann from @nasa - How did Uranus get tilted so much that it spins on its side? This question has made many a scientist wonder. New research looking back at the planet’s early formation points to a young proto-planet of rock and ice colliding with Uranus, causing its extreme tilt. Instead of rotating like a top spinning nearly upright, as Earth does, the planet “rolls” on its side as it circles the Sun.

While it is the butt of many jokes, Uranus is actually a fascinating world to study. It is about four times wider than Earth orbiting our Sun at a distance of about 1.8 billion miles (2.9 billion kilometers). Uranus takes about 17 hours to rotate once (a Uranian day), and about 84 Earth years to complete an orbit of the Sun (a Uranian year). Uranus has 27 known moons, and they are named after characters from the works of William Shakespeare and Alexander Pope. With 13 known rings, we've seen that the inner rings are narrow and dark and the outer rings are brightly colored.

This false-color image was generated by Erich Karkoschka using data taken on August 8, 1998, with the @NASAHubble Space Telescope's Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer.
Source: NASA/JPL/STScI
#nasa #space #solarsystem #uranus #hubble #picoftheday #colors #planet #planets #rings #spothubble #pictureoftheday - #regrann


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#Repost @nasa with @get_repost
・・・
How did Uranus get tilted so much that it spins on its side? This question has made many a scientist wonder. New research looking back at the planet’s early formation points to a young proto-planet of rock and ice colliding with Uranus, causing its extreme tilt. Instead of rotating like a top spinning nearly upright, as Earth does, the planet “rolls” on its side as it circles the Sun.

While it is the butt of many jokes, Uranus is actually a fascinating world to study. It is about four times wider than Earth orbiting our Sun at a distance of about 1.8 billion miles (2.9 billion kilometers). Uranus takes about 17 hours to rotate once (a Uranian day), and about 84 Earth years to complete an orbit of the Sun (a Uranian year). Uranus has 27 known moons, and they are named after characters from the works of William Shakespeare and Alexander Pope. With 13 known rings, we've seen that the inner rings are narrow and dark and the outer rings are brightly colored.

This false-color image was generated by Erich Karkoschka using data taken on August 8, 1998, with the @NASAHubble Space Telescope's Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer.
Source: NASA/JPL/STScI
#nasa #space #solarsystem #uranus #hubble #picoftheday #colors #planet #planets #rings #spothubble #pictureoftheday


0

How did Uranus get tilted so much that it spins on its side? This question has made many a scientist wonder. New research looking back at the planet’s early formation points to a young proto-planet of rock and ice colliding with Uranus, causing its extreme tilt. Instead of rotating like a top spinning nearly upright, as Earth does, the planet “rolls” on its side as it circles the Sun.

While it is the butt of many jokes, Uranus is actually a fascinating world to study. It is about four times wider than Earth orbiting our Sun at a distance of about 1.8 billion miles (2.9 billion kilometers). Uranus takes about 17 hours to rotate once (a Uranian day), and about 84 Earth years to complete an orbit of the Sun (a Uranian year). Uranus has 27 known moons, and they are named after characters from the works of William Shakespeare and Alexander Pope. With 13 known rings, we've seen that the inner rings are narrow and dark and the outer rings are brightly colored.

This false-color image was generated by Erich Karkoschka using data taken on August 8, 1998, with the @NASAHubble Space Telescope's Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer.
Source: NASA/JPL/STScI
#nasa #space #solarsystem #uranus #hubble #picoftheday #colors #planet #planets #rings #spothubble #pictureoftheday


1

“O planeta que tombou”... é ou não o mais fascinante? #uranus #solarsystem #urano #planets #sogorgeous #fascinating 🙌🏼💜💙🌏🚀🛸 #tks #nasa #hubble #hubbletelescope
#Repost @nasa with @get_repost
・・・
How did Uranus get tilted so much that it spins on its side? This question has made many a scientist wonder. New research looking back at the planet’s early formation points to a young proto-planet of rock and ice colliding with Uranus, causing its extreme tilt. Instead of rotating like a top spinning nearly upright, as Earth does, the planet “rolls” on its side as it circles the Sun.

While it is the butt of many jokes, Uranus is actually a fascinating world to study. It is about four times wider than Earth orbiting our Sun at a distance of about 1.8 billion miles (2.9 billion kilometers). Uranus takes about 17 hours to rotate once (a Uranian day), and about 84 Earth years to complete an orbit of the Sun (a Uranian year). Uranus has 27 known moons, and they are named after characters from the works of William Shakespeare and Alexander Pope. With 13 known rings, we've seen that the inner rings are narrow and dark and the outer rings are brightly colored.

This false-color image was generated by Erich Karkoschka using data taken on August 8, 1998, with the @NASAHubble Space Telescope's Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer.
Source: NASA/JPL/STScI
#nasa #space #solarsystem #uranus #hubble #picoftheday #colors #planet #planets #rings #spothubble #pictureoftheday


3

All jokes aside! #Repost @nasa with @get_repost
・・・
How did Uranus get tilted so much that it spins on its side? This question has made many a scientist wonder. New research looking back at the planet’s early formation points to a young proto-planet of rock and ice colliding with Uranus, causing its extreme tilt. Instead of rotating like a top spinning nearly upright, as Earth does, the planet “rolls” on its side as it circles the Sun.

While it is the butt of many jokes, Uranus is actually a fascinating world to study. It is about four times wider than Earth orbiting our Sun at a distance of about 1.8 billion miles (2.9 billion kilometers). Uranus takes about 17 hours to rotate once (a Uranian day), and about 84 Earth years to complete an orbit of the Sun (a Uranian year). Uranus has 27 known moons, and they are named after characters from the works of William Shakespeare and Alexander Pope. With 13 known rings, we've seen that the inner rings are narrow and dark and the outer rings are brightly colored.

This false-color image was generated by Erich Karkoschka using data taken on August 8, 1998, with the @NASAHubble Space Telescope's Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer.
Source: NASA/JPL/STScI
#nasa #space #solarsystem #uranus #hubble #picoftheday #colors #planet #planets #rings #spothubble #pictureoftheday


2

How did Uranus get tilted so much that it spins on its side? This question has made many a scientist wonder. New research looking back at the planet’s early formation points to a young proto-planet of rock and ice colliding with Uranus, causing its extreme tilt. Instead of rotating like a top spinning nearly upright, as Earth does, the planet “rolls” on its side as it circles the Sun.

While it is the butt of many jokes, Uranus is actually a fascinating world to study. It is about four times wider than Earth orbiting our Sun at a distance of about 1.8 billion miles (2.9 billion kilometers). Uranus takes about 17 hours to rotate once (a Uranian day), and about 84 Earth years to complete an orbit of the Sun (a Uranian year). Uranus has 27 known moons, and they are named after characters from the works of William Shakespeare and Alexander Pope. With 13 known rings, we've seen that the inner rings are narrow and dark and the outer rings are brightly colored.

This false-color image was generated by Erich Karkoschka using data taken on August 8, 1998, with the @NASAHubble Space Telescope's Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer.
Source: NASA/JPL/STScI
#nasa #space #solarsystem #uranus #hubble #picoftheday #colors #planet #planets #rings #spothubble #pictureoftheday


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💡🤓 #spacehistory @nasa How did Uranus get tilted so much that it spins on its side? This question has made many a scientist wonder. New research looking back at the planet’s early formation points to a young proto-planet of rock and ice colliding with Uranus, causing its extreme tilt. Instead of rotating like a top spinning nearly upright, as Earth does, the planet “rolls” on its side as it circles the Sun.

While it is the butt of many jokes, Uranus is actually a fascinating world to study. It is about four times wider than Earth orbiting our Sun at a distance of about 1.8 billion miles (2.9 billion kilometers). Uranus takes about 17 hours to rotate once (a Uranian day), and about 84 Earth years to complete an orbit of the Sun (a Uranian year). Uranus has 27 known moons, and they are named after characters from the works of William Shakespeare and Alexander Pope. With 13 known rings, we've seen that the inner rings are narrow and dark and the outer rings are brightly colored.

This false-color image was generated by Erich Karkoschka using data taken on August 8, 1998, with the @NASAHubble Space Telescope's Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer.
Source: NASA/JPL/STScI
#nasa #space #solarsystem #uranus #hubble #picoftheday #colors #planet #planets #rings #spothubble #artandscience #artandtechnology #spaceexploration


3

RepostBy @nasa: "Twinkle, twinkle, many stars! ⭐️ Spotted by our @NASAHubble telescope roughly in the direction of the center of the Milky Way, is this gravitationally bound collection of stars, also known as a globular cluster. Globular clusters contain hundreds of thousands of stars that are thought to have formed at roughly the same time.

Studies have shown that the globular cluster seen here is home to an aging population of stars. Most globular clusters orbiting the Milky Way are estimated to be over 10 billion years old; as a result, they contain some of the oldest stars in our galaxy, formed very early in the galaxy’s history. However, their role in galactic evolution is still a matter of study.

Credit: NASA/ESA/Hubble

#nasa #hubble #stars #stargazing #space #astronomy #spothubble #solarsystem #universe #galaxy #science #pictureoftheday #beautiful #light #picoftheday"


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RepostBy @nasa: "How did Uranus get tilted so much that it spins on its side? This question has made many a scientist wonder. New research looking back at the planet’s early formation points to a young proto-planet of rock and ice colliding with Uranus, causing its extreme tilt. Instead of rotating like a top spinning nearly upright, as Earth does, the planet “rolls” on its side as it circles the Sun.

While it is the butt of many jokes, Uranus is actually a fascinating world to study. It is about four times wider than Earth orbiting our Sun at a distance of about 1.8 billion miles (2.9 billion kilometers). Uranus takes about 17 hours to rotate once (a Uranian day), and about 84 Earth years to complete an orbit of the Sun (a Uranian year). Uranus has 27 known moons, and they are named after characters from the works of William Shakespeare and Alexander Pope. With 13 known rings, we've seen that the inner rings are narrow and dark and the outer rings are brightly colored.

This false-color image was generated by Erich Karkoschka using data taken on August 8, 1998, with the @NASAHubble Space Telescope's Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer.
Source: NASA/JPL/STScI
#nasa #space #solarsystem #uranus #hubble #picoftheday #colors #planet #planets #rings #spothubble #pictureoftheday"


0

@nasa - How did Uranus get tilted so much that it spins on its side? This question has made many a scientist wonder. New research looking back at the planet’s early formation points to a young proto-planet of rock and ice colliding with Uranus, causing its extreme tilt. Instead of rotating like a top spinning nearly upright, as Earth does, the planet “rolls” on its side as it circles the Sun.

While it is the butt of many jokes, Uranus is actually a fascinating world to study. It is about four times wider than Earth orbiting our Sun at a distance of about 1.8 billion miles (2.9 billion kilometers). Uranus takes about 17 hours to rotate once (a Uranian day), and about 84 Earth years to complete an orbit of the Sun (a Uranian year). Uranus has 27 known moons, and they are named after characters from the works of William Shakespeare and Alexander Pope. With 13 known rings, we've seen that the inner rings are narrow and dark and the outer rings are brightly colored.

This false-color image was generated by Erich Karkoschka using data taken on August 8, 1998, with the @NASAHubble Space Telescope's Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer.
Source: NASA/JPL/STScI
#nasa #space #solarsystem #uranus #hubble #picoftheday #colors #planet #planets #rings #spothubble #pictureoftheday


0

repost via @instarepost20 from @nasa How did Uranus get tilted so much that it spins on its side? This question has made many a scientist wonder. New research looking back at the planet’s early formation points to a young proto-planet of rock and ice colliding with Uranus, causing its extreme tilt. Instead of rotating like a top spinning nearly upright, as Earth does, the planet “rolls” on its side as it circles the Sun.

While it is the butt of many jokes, Uranus is actually a fascinating world to study. It is about four times wider than Earth orbiting our Sun at a distance of about 1.8 billion miles (2.9 billion kilometers). Uranus takes about 17 hours to rotate once (a Uranian day), and about 84 Earth years to complete an orbit of the Sun (a Uranian year). Uranus has 27 known moons, and they are named after characters from the works of William Shakespeare and Alexander Pope. With 13 known rings, we've seen that the inner rings are narrow and dark and the outer rings are brightly colored.

This false-color image was generated by Erich Karkoschka using data taken on August 8, 1998, with the @NASAHubble Space Telescope's Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer.
Source: NASA/JPL/STScI
#nasa #space #solarsystem #uranus #hubble #picoftheday #colors #planet #planets #rings #spothubble #pictureoftheday


0

💜 How did Uranus get tilted so much that it spins on its side? This question has made many a scientist wonder. New research looking back at the planet’s early formation points to a young proto-planet of rock and ice colliding with Uranus, causing its extreme tilt. Instead of rotating like a top spinning nearly upright, as Earth does, the planet “rolls” on its side as it circles the Sun.

While it is the butt of many jokes, Uranus is actually a fascinating world to study. It is about four times wider than Earth orbiting our Sun at a distance of about 1.8 billion miles (2.9 billion kilometers). Uranus takes about 17 hours to rotate once (a Uranian day), and about 84 Earth years to complete an orbit of the Sun (a Uranian year). Uranus has 27 known moons, and they are named after characters from the works of William Shakespeare and Alexander Pope. With 13 known rings, we've seen that the inner rings are narrow and dark and the outer rings are brightly colored.

This false-color image was generated by Erich Karkoschka using data taken on August 8, 1998, with the @NASAHubble Space Telescope's Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer.
Source: NASA/JPL/STScI
#nasa #space #solarsystem #uranus #hubble #picoftheday #colors #planet #planets #rings #spothubble #pictureoftheday


1

#Repost from @nasa by @multisave_app
•••
How did Uranus get tilted so much that it spins on its side? This question has made many a scientist wonder. New research looking back at the planet’s early formation points to a young proto-planet of rock and ice colliding with Uranus, causing its extreme tilt. Instead of rotating like a top spinning nearly upright, as Earth does, the planet “rolls” on its side as it circles the Sun.

While it is the butt of many jokes, Uranus is actually a fascinating world to study. It is about four times wider than Earth orbiting our Sun at a distance of about 1.8 billion miles (2.9 billion kilometers). Uranus takes about 17 hours to rotate once (a Uranian day), and about 84 Earth years to complete an orbit of the Sun (a Uranian year). Uranus has 27 known moons, and they are named after characters from the works of William Shakespeare and Alexander Pope. With 13 known rings, we've seen that the inner rings are narrow and dark and the outer rings are brightly colored.

This false-color image was generated by Erich Karkoschka using data taken on August 8, 1998, with the @NASAHubble Space Telescope's Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer.
Source: NASA/JPL/STScI
#nasa #space #solarsystem #uranus #hubble #picoftheday #colors #planet #planets #rings #spothubble #pictureoftheday


2

from @nasa
How did Uranus get tilted so much that it spins on its side? This question has made many a scientist wonder. New research looking back at the planet’s early formation points to a young proto-planet of rock and ice colliding with Uranus, causing its extreme tilt. Instead of rotating like a top spinning nearly upright, as Earth does, the planet “rolls” on its side as it circles the Sun.

While it is the butt of many jokes, Uranus is actually a fascinating world to study. It is about four times wider than Earth orbiting our Sun at a distance of about 1.8 billion miles (2.9 billion kilometers). Uranus takes about 17 hours to rotate once (a Uranian day), and about 84 Earth years to complete an orbit of the Sun (a Uranian year). Uranus has 27 known moons, and they are named after characters from the works of William Shakespeare and Alexander Pope. With 13 known rings, we've seen that the inner rings are narrow and dark and the outer rings are brightly colored.

This false-color image was generated by Erich Karkoschka using data taken on August 8, 1998, with the @NASAHubble Space Telescope's Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer.
Source: NASA/JPL/STScI
#nasa #space #solarsystem #uranus #hubble #picoftheday #colors #planet #planets #rings #spothubble #pictureoftheday


0

#Repost @nasa with @get_repost
・・・
How did Uranus get tilted so much that it spins on its side? This question has made many a scientist wonder. New research looking back at the planet’s early formation points to a young proto-planet of rock and ice colliding with Uranus, causing its extreme tilt. Instead of rotating like a top spinning nearly upright, as Earth does, the planet “rolls” on its side as it circles the Sun.

While it is the butt of many jokes, Uranus is actually a fascinating world to study. It is about four times wider than Earth orbiting our Sun at a distance of about 1.8 billion miles (2.9 billion kilometers). Uranus takes about 17 hours to rotate once (a Uranian day), and about 84 Earth years to complete an orbit of the Sun (a Uranian year). Uranus has 27 known moons, and they are named after characters from the works of William Shakespeare and Alexander Pope. With 13 known rings, we've seen that the inner rings are narrow and dark and the outer rings are brightly colored.

This false-color image was generated by Erich Karkoschka using data taken on August 8, 1998, with the @NASAHubble Space Telescope's Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer.
Source: NASA/JPL/STScI
#nasa #space #solarsystem #uranus #hubble #picoftheday #colors #planet #planets #rings #spothubble #pictureoftheday


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Regrann from @nasa - How did Uranus get tilted so much that it spins on its side? This question has made many a scientist wonder. New research looking back at the planet’s early formation points to a young proto-planet of rock and ice colliding with Uranus, causing its extreme tilt. Instead of rotating like a top spinning nearly upright, as Earth does, the planet “rolls” on its side as it circles the Sun.

While it is the butt of many jokes, Uranus is actually a fascinating world to study. It is about four times wider than Earth orbiting our Sun at a distance of about 1.8 billion miles (2.9 billion kilometers). Uranus takes about 17 hours to rotate once (a Uranian day), and about 84 Earth years to complete an orbit of the Sun (a Uranian year). Uranus has 27 known moons, and they are named after characters from the works of William Shakespeare and Alexander Pope. With 13 known rings, we've seen that the inner rings are narrow and dark and the outer rings are brightly colored.

This false-color image was generated by Erich Karkoschka using data taken on August 8, 1998, with the @NASAHubble Space Telescope's Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer.
Source: NASA/JPL/STScI
#nasa #space #solarsystem #uranus #hubble #picoftheday #colors #planet #planets #rings #spothubble #pictureoftheday - #regrann #leonor #rp


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How did Uranus get tilted so much that it spins on its side? This question has made many a scientist wonder. New research looking back at the planet’s early formation points to a young proto-planet of rock and ice colliding with Uranus, causing its extreme tilt. Instead of rotating like a top spinning nearly upright, as Earth does, the planet “rolls” on its side as it circles the Sun.

While it is the butt of many jokes, Uranus is actually a fascinating world to study. It is about four times wider than Earth orbiting our Sun at a distance of about 1.8 billion miles (2.9 billion kilometers). Uranus takes about 17 hours to rotate once (a Uranian day), and about 84 Earth years to complete an orbit of the Sun (a Uranian year). Uranus has 27 known moons, and they are named after characters from the works of William Shakespeare and Alexander Pope. With 13 known rings, we've seen that the inner rings are narrow and dark and the outer rings are brightly colored.

This false-color image was generated by Erich Karkoschka using data taken on August 8, 1998, with the @NASAHubble Space Telescope's Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer.
Source: NASA/JPL/STScI
#nasa #space #solarsystem #uranus #hubble #picoftheday #colors #planet #planets #rings #spothubble #pictureoftheday


0

#Repost @nasa
・・・
How did Uranus get tilted so much that it spins on its side? This question has made many a scientist wonder. New research looking back at the planet’s early formation points to a young proto-planet of rock and ice colliding with Uranus, causing its extreme tilt. Instead of rotating like a top spinning nearly upright, as Earth does, the planet “rolls” on its side as it circles the Sun.

While it is the butt of many jokes, Uranus is actually a fascinating world to study. It is about four times wider than Earth orbiting our Sun at a distance of about 1.8 billion miles (2.9 billion kilometers). Uranus takes about 17 hours to rotate once (a Uranian day), and about 84 Earth years to complete an orbit of the Sun (a Uranian year). Uranus has 27 known moons, and they are named after characters from the works of William Shakespeare and Alexander Pope. With 13 known rings, we've seen that the inner rings are narrow and dark and the outer rings are brightly colored.

This false-color image was generated by Erich Karkoschka using data taken on August 8, 1998, with the @NASAHubble Space Telescope's Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer.
Source: NASA/JPL/STScI
#nasa #space #solarsystem #uranus #hubble #picoftheday #colors #planet #planets #rings #spothubble #pictureoftheday


0

#Repost @nasa (@get_repost)
・・・
How did Uranus get tilted so much that it spins on its side? This question has made many a scientist wonder. New research looking back at the planet’s early formation points to a young proto-planet of rock and ice colliding with Uranus, causing its extreme tilt. Instead of rotating like a top spinning nearly upright, as Earth does, the planet “rolls” on its side as it circles the Sun.

While it is the butt of many jokes, Uranus is actually a fascinating world to study. It is about four times wider than Earth orbiting our Sun at a distance of about 1.8 billion miles (2.9 billion kilometers). Uranus takes about 17 hours to rotate once (a Uranian day), and about 84 Earth years to complete an orbit of the Sun (a Uranian year). Uranus has 27 known moons, and they are named after characters from the works of William Shakespeare and Alexander Pope. With 13 known rings, we've seen that the inner rings are narrow and dark and the outer rings are brightly colored.

This false-color image was generated by Erich Karkoschka using data taken on August 8, 1998, with the @NASAHubble Space Telescope's Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer.
Source: NASA/JPL/STScI
#nasa #space #solarsystem #uranus #hubble #picoftheday #colors #planet #planets #rings #spothubble #pictureoftheday


0

#Repost @nasa
How did Uranus get tilted so much that it spins on its side? This question has made many a scientist wonder. New research looking back at the planet’s early formation points to a young proto-planet of rock and ice colliding with Uranus, causing its extreme tilt. Instead of rotating like a top spinning nearly upright, as Earth does, the planet “rolls” on its side as it circles the Sun.

While it is the butt of many jokes, Uranus is actually a fascinating world to study. It is about four times wider than Earth orbiting our Sun at a distance of about 1.8 billion miles (2.9 billion kilometers). Uranus takes about 17 hours to rotate once (a Uranian day), and about 84 Earth years to complete an orbit of the Sun (a Uranian year). Uranus has 27 known moons, and they are named after characters from the works of William Shakespeare and Alexander Pope. With 13 known rings, we've seen that the inner rings are narrow and dark and the outer rings are brightly colored.

This false-color image was generated by Erich Karkoschka using data taken on August 8, 1998, with the @NASAHubble Space Telescope's Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer.
Source: NASA/JPL/STScI
#nasa #space #solarsystem #uranus #hubble #picoftheday #colors #planet #planets #rings #spothubble #pictureoftheday


0