#spothubble

Instagram photos and videos

#nasa#spothubble#hubble#space#telescope#solarsystem#galaxy#universe#science#spacetelescope#cluster#star#largemagellaniccloud#stars#Repost#beautiful#astronomy#pictureoftheday#light#earth#جهان_هستی#بزرگی_جهان_هستی#عظمت_جهان_هستی#cosmos#دنیا#bright#planet#esa#sun#galaxies

Hashtags #spothubble for Instagram

A little galaxy commission for the holidays. #realism #oilpainting #contemporaryrealism #painting #fineartgirts #galaxy #spothubble


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A treasure trove of celestial wonder! 🌟 Our @NASAHubble Space Telescope recently spotted a mix of different galaxies, some of which belong to the same larger structure — a galaxy cluster located in the middle of the frame.

The gigantic mass of this cluster creates the fascinating phenomenon of strong gravitational lensing. The gravity of the cluster bends light coming from behind it in a similar way to how the base of a wine glass bends light. The effects of this lensing can be clearly seen as curved streaks forming a circular shape around the center of the frame. Astronomers can use these distorted galaxies to calculate the mass of the cluster — including the mass of the dark matter within it — and to peer deeper into the universe than otherwise possible. Gravitational lensing not only distorts the views of galaxies, it also enlarges their appearance in the sky and magnifies their light.

Hubble has viewed gravitational lensing many times and produced truly stunning images. Astronomers even set up a dedicated program called Frontier Fields to study different galaxy clusters that show a great number of lensed galaxies. Some of the most distant galaxies in the universe were found this way. With each additional cluster observed, more distant galaxies are added to this list, slowly completing our picture of how galaxies looked and evolved in the early universe.

Credit: @europeanspaceagency & NASA

#nasa #space #hubble #spothubble #spacetelescope #telescope #galaxy #cluster #gravity #lensing #beautiful #universe #solarsystem #science #bright #distortion #phenomenon
by @nasa 💯✌🏽😎


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Indeed, your Lord is Allah, who created the heavens and earth in six days and then established Himself above the Throne. He covers the night with the day, [another night] chasing it rapidly; and [He created] the sun, the moon, and the stars, subjected by His command. Unquestionably, His is the creation and the command; blessed is Allah, Lord of the worlds.

7:54
Al-A'raf, Ayah 54
#SubhanAllah #DesignedByAllah
#Repost @nasa
・・・
A Treasure Chest of Galaxies ✨

Our @NASAHubble Space Telescope captured this spectacular image showing spiral arms swirling in all colors and orientations, and fuzzy ellipticals speckled across the frame as softly glowing smudges on the sky.
Each visible speck of a galaxy is home to countless stars. A few stars closer to home shine brightly in the foreground, while a massive galaxy cluster nestles at the very center of the image — an immense collection of maybe thousands of galaxies, all held together by the relentless force of gravity.

Galaxy clusters, like the ones seen here by our NASA Hubble Space Telescope, are some of the most interesting objects in the cosmos. Their immense gravitational influence means they distort the space-time around them, causing them to act like giant zoom lenses. The light of background galaxies is warped and magnified as it passes through the galaxy cluster, allowing astronomers insight into the distant — and therefore early — universe.

Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA, RELICS

#nasa #space #solarsystem #hubble #galaxies #pictureoftheday #telescope #cosmos #astronomy #stars #sky #spothubble #spacetelescope


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If you want to have just an inkling of how Majestic God is ,follow the @nasa page and view some of their images taken from space of the earth 🌏,sun ,stars etc .You will be in awe of the works of His hands
You will be able to put some lyrics and verses in Perspective
Isaiah 40:26
Lift up your eyes on high And see who has created these stars, The One who leads forth their host by number, He calls them all by name; Because of the greatness of His might and the strength of His power, Not one of them is missing.

Repost from @nasa using @RepostRegramApp - A treasure trove of celestial wonder! 🌟 Our @NASAHubble Space Telescope recently spotted a mix of different galaxies, some of which belong to the same larger structure — a galaxy cluster located in the middle of the frame.

The gigantic mass of this cluster creates the fascinating phenomenon of strong gravitational lensing. The gravity of the cluster bends light coming from behind it in a similar way to how the base of a wine glass bends light. The effects of this lensing can be clearly seen as curved streaks forming a circular shape around the center of the frame. Astronomers can use these distorted galaxies to calculate the mass of the cluster — including the mass of the dark matter within it — and to peer deeper into the universe than otherwise possible. Gravitational lensing not only distorts the views of galaxies, it also enlarges their appearance in the sky and magnifies their light.

Hubble has viewed gravitational lensing many times and produced truly stunning images. Astronomers even set up a dedicated program called Frontier Fields to study different galaxy clusters that show a great number of lensed galaxies. Some of the most distant galaxies in the universe were found this way. With each additional cluster observed, more distant galaxies are added to this list, slowly completing our picture of how galaxies looked and evolved in the early universe.

Credit: @europeanspaceagency & NASA

#nasa #space #hubble #spothubble #spacetelescope #telescope #galaxy #cluster #gravity #lensing #beautiful #universe #solarsystem #science #bright #distortion #phenomenon


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How did Uranus get tilted so much that it spins on its side? This question has made many a scientist wonder. New research looking back at the planet’s early formation points to a young proto-planet of rock and ice colliding with Uranus, causing its extreme tilt. Instead of rotating like a top spinning nearly upright, as Earth does, the planet “rolls” on its side as it circles the Sun.

While it is the butt of many jokes, Uranus is actually a fascinating world to study. It is about four times wider than Earth orbiting our Sun at a distance of about 1.8 billion miles (2.9 billion kilometers). Uranus takes about 17 hours to rotate once (a Uranian day), and about 84 Earth years to complete an orbit of the Sun (a Uranian year). Uranus has 27 known moons, and they are named after characters from the works of William Shakespeare and Alexander Pope. With 13 known rings, we've seen that the inner rings are narrow and dark and the outer rings are brightly colored.

This false-color image was generated by Erich Karkoschka using data taken on August 8, 1998, with the @NASAHubble Space Telescope's Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer.
Source: NASA/JPL/STScI
#nasa #space #solarsystem #uranus #hubble #picoftheday #colors #planet #planets #rings #spothubble #pictureoftheday


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Beautiful, sparkling arms swirl outward from a bar slicing through this galaxy’s center in this image captured by the Hubble Space Telescope (@NASAHubble). It is classified as an active galaxy, which means that it hosts an active galactic nucleus – a compact region at a galaxy’s center where material is dragged towards a supermassive black hole. As this black hole devours the surrounding matter it emits intense radiation, causing it to shine brightly.
But this galaxy is more exotic still. It essentially acts as a giant astronomical laser that also spews out light at microwave, not visible, wavelengths — this type of object is dubbed a megamaser (maser being the term for a microwave laser). Megamasers such as this can be some 100 million times brighter than masers found in galaxies like the Milky Way!
Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA
#nasa #space #hubble #spothubble #telescope #galaxy #universe #solarsystem #swirl #arms #beautiful #center #active #microwave #visible #light #bright #pictureoftheday #astronomy #science


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#repost ..How far is the farthest star we've ever seen? More than halfway across the universe, an enormous blue star nicknamed Icarus was spotted by the Hubble Space Telescope (@NASAHubble) through a quirk of nature that amplified the star's feeble glow. The star, harbored in a very distant spiral galaxy, is so far away that its light has taken 9 billion years to reach Earth. It appears to us as it did when the universe was about 30 percent of its current age.
This video shows a galaxy cluster located about 5 billion light-years from Earth. This massive cluster of galaxies sits between the Earth and the galaxy that contains the distant star. Thanks to a lucky alignment between the cluster, a dense object within it and a distant star, the image of the distant star was magnified by a factor of 2000, making it visible by the Hubble Space Telescope.
Like the galaxy in which the star is located, the star is actually visible several times. However, the light from the second image of the star was redirected by another massive object in the cluster and only became visible when this object moved out of the line of sight.
The video shows the position of the two images of the star within the cluster.
Credit: @europeanspaceagency/Hubble, NASA
#nasa #space #hubble #spothubble #spacetelescope #telescope #galaxy #cluster #star #universe #solarsystem #lightyears #billions #visible #beautiful #earth #video #science


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In space, being outshone is an occupational hazard. This Hubble Space Telescope image captures a galaxy named NGC 7250. Despite being remarkable in its own right — it has bright bursts of star formation and recorded supernova explosions— it blends into the background somewhat thanks to the gloriously bright star hogging the limelight next to it.
The bright object seen in this Hubble image is a single and little-studied star named TYC 3203-450-1, located in the constellation of Lacerta (The Lizard). The star is much closer than the much more distant galaxy.
Only this way can a normal star outshine an entire galaxy, consisting of billions of stars. Astronomers studying distant objects call these stars “foreground stars” and they are often not very happy about them, as their bright light is contaminating the faint light from the more distant and interesting objects they actually want to study.
Credits: ESA/Hubble & NASA
#nasa #space #hubble #galaxy #star #universe #solarsystem #lizard #lacerta #constellation #light #telescope #supernova #spothubble


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The Hubble Space Telescope has some amazing superpowers, specifically when it comes to observing innumerable galaxies flung across time and space. A stunning example is a galaxy cluster called Abell 370. Located approximately 4 billion light-years away, this galaxy cluster contains an assortment of several hundred galaxies tied together by the mutual pull of gravity.
Photographed in a combination of visible and near-infrared light, the brightest and largest galaxies are the yellow-white, massive, elliptical galaxies containing many hundreds of billions of stars EACH! Spiral galaxies have younger populations of stars and are bluish. Mysterious-looking arcs of blue light are distorted images of remote galaxies behind the cluster. The cluster acts as a huge lens in space that magnifies and stretches images of background galaxies like a funhouse mirror.
Credits: NASA/ESA/STScI
#nasa #space #hubble #stars #galaxy #galaxies #cluster #galaxycluster #spothubble #esa #spacetelescope #telescope #gravity #lightyear #nasahubble #light #universe #solarsystem


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Although appearing as one object, this image shows two galaxies rushing past each other at about 1,243,000 miles per hour! This speed is most likely too fast for them to merge and form a single galaxy. However, because of their small separation of only about 20,000 light-years, the galaxies will distort one another through the force of gravity while passing each other, changing their structures on a grand scale.

Such galactic interactions are a common sight for Hubble, and have long been a field of study for astronomers. The intriguing behaviors of interacting galaxies take many forms; galactic cannibalism, galaxy harassment and even galaxy collisions. The Milky Way itself will eventually fall victim to the latter, merging with the Andromeda Galaxy in about 4.5 billion years. The fate of our galaxy shouldn’t be alarming though: while galaxies are populated by billions of stars, the distances between individual stars are so large that hardly any stellar collisions will occur.

Credit: ESA/NASA

#nasa #space #hubble #stars #galaxy #galaxies #cluster #galaxycluster #spothubble #esa #spacetelescope #telescope #gravity #lightyear #nasahubble #light #universe #solarsystem


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Hubble Space Telescope (@NASAHubble) looked toward the constellation of the Swordfish (Dorado) and captured this stunning celestial image.
Nestled within the Large Magellanic Cloud, this globular cluster – a tightly bound group of stars – features a ruby-red spot that is actually a carbon star. Carbon stars are almost always cool red giants, with atmospheres containing more carbon that oxygen, which is the opposite of our Sun.
Carbon monoxide forms in the outer layer of the star through a combination of these elements, until there is no more oxygen available. Carbon atoms are then free to form a variety of other carbon compounds, which scatter blue light within the star, allowing red light to pass through undisturbed. .
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Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA

#nasa #space #hubble #spothubble #spacetelescope #telescope #cluster #star #galaxy #universe #solarsystem #red #ruby #swordfish #largemagellaniccloud #herschel #science #carbon #sun #elements


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Jagged spikes, speckled noise and weird, clashing colors…what does this Hubble Space Telescope image show? A distant galaxy, visible as the smudge to the lower right, as it begins to align and pass behind a star sitting nearer to us within the Milky Way. This is an event known as a transit and can tell us a lot about these celestial objects.
Image credit: ESA/NASA
#nasa #space #hubble #stars #galaxy #galaxies #spothubble #esa #spacetelescope #telescope #nasahubble #light #universe #nofilter #weird #colorful


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Our @NASAHubble Space Telescope detected an unusual infrared light radiating from a nearby neutron star, which forms when a massive star runs out of fuel and collapses. But what is it?

These never-seen-before features could have two possible explanations: one possibility is that there is a dusty disk surrounding the neutron star; another is that there is an energetic wind coming off the object and slamming into gas in interstellar space the neutron star is plowing through.

This animation depicts a neutron star with a disk of warm dust that produces an infrared signature as detected by Hubble. The disk wasn’t directly photographed, but one way to explain the data is by hypothesizing a disk structure that could be 18 billion miles across. The disk would be made up of material falling back onto the neutron star after the supernova explosion that created the stellar remnant.

Although neutron stars are generally studied in radio and high-energy emissions, such as X-rays, recent studies show that new and interesting information about neutron stars can also be gained by studying them in infrared light. Neutron stars are also called pulsars because their very fast rotation (typically fractions of a second, in this case 11 seconds) causes time-variable emission from light-emitting regions.

Using our upcoming James Webb Space Telescope (@NASAwebb), astronomers will be able to further explore this newly opened discovery space in the infrared to better understand neutron star evolution.

Credit: NASA, ESA, and N. Tr’Ehnl (Pennsylvania State University)

#nasa #space #hubble #spothubble #spacetelescope #telescope #cosmos #stars #galaxy #infrared #light #supernova #explosion #beautiful #universe #science #bright #xrays

Repost via @nasa


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❄️❄️❄️Қарасулықтар, Ауылға жиі баратын Семейліктер, маған ауылымыздың жұлдызды аспаны мен түнгі тыныштық үнін видеоға📹 түсіріп уотсаппыма салып жіберіңіздерш, өтініш🙏🏼🙏🏼😊 О жақтағы аспан Насаның суретінен де артығырақ. Күнде көргендіктен, мекен тұрғындарына оның сұлулығы байқалмайтын да шығар.

Былтыр қыста ауылға барғанымда түнгі сағат жуық мөлшермен 3️⃣:3️⃣0️⃣ (әңгіме таусылмайды ғой) шамасында далаға шығып, қою көк жұлдызды аспанға қарап, таза ауа жұтып, сол түн тыныштығына сүйсініп, тамсанып біраз уақыт тұрған едім раxаттанып. Үйге кіріп әсеріммен бөліссем, Әсет (Гауһар құрбының тірегі) ой, дала малдың боғы сасиды деп қатырған еді😄😄😄. Видео күтем, жақсы көретіндерім🤗@baisadykov.nurhat @kalievaulpan @abrenova.a @aiymbutabaeva басқа да жерлестерім🤝
#Repost @nasa with @get_repost
・・・
These dots of color make up one of the most comprehensive portraits yet of the universe’s evolutionary history. This mosaic, captured with the ultraviolet vision of our Hubble Space Telescope (@NASAHubble), features approximately 15,000 galaxies, about 12,000 of which are star-forming – widely distributed in time and space.
Hubble’s ultraviolet vision opens a new window on the evolving universe, tracking the birth of stars over the last 11 billion years back to the cosmos’ busiest star-forming period, which happened about 3 billion years after the big bang. Because Earth’s atmosphere filters most ultraviolet light, Hubble can provide some of the most sensitive space-based ultraviolet observations possible.

Ultraviolet light has been the missing piece to the cosmic puzzle. Now, combined with infrared and visible-light data from Hubble and other space and ground-based telescopes, astronomers have assembled one of the most comprehensive portraits yet of the universe’s evolutionary history.

Credit: NASA, ESA, P. Oesch (University of Geneva), and M. Montes (University of New South Wales)

#nasa #space #hubble #spothubble #telescope #galaxy #stars #forming #universe #solarsystem #planets #astronomers #bigbang #earth #ultraviolet #science #portrait #mosaic


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This glittering ball of stars is a globular cluster lying toward the center of the Large Magellanic Cloud — one of our closest cosmic neighbors. Seen by the Hubble Space Telescope (), it hosts an extremely rich population of star clusters making it an ideal laboratory for investigating star formation.
Discovered in November 1834 by British astronomer John Herschel, NGC 1898 has been scrutinized numerous times by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. Today we know that globular clusters are some of the oldest known objects in the universe and that they are relics of the first epochs of galaxy formation. While we already have a pretty good picture on the globular clusters of the Milky Way — still with many unanswered questions — our studies on globular clusters in nearby dwarf galaxies just started. The observations of NGC 1898 will help to determine whether their properties are similar to the ones found in the Milky Way, or if they have different features, due to being in a different cosmic environment.

Image Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA
#nasa #space #hubble #spothubble #spacetelescope #telescope #cluster #star #galaxy #universe #solarsystem #largemagellaniccloud #science
Via : @nasa


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This glittering ball of stars is a globular cluster lying toward the center of the Large Magellanic Cloud — one of our closest cosmic neighbors. Seen by the Hubble Space Telescope (), it hosts an extremely rich population of star clusters making it an ideal laboratory for investigating star formation.
Discovered in November 1834 by British astronomer John Herschel, NGC 1898 has been scrutinized numerous times by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. Today we know that globular clusters are some of the oldest known objects in the universe and that they are relics of the first epochs of galaxy formation. While we already have a pretty good picture on the globular clusters of the Milky Way — still with many unanswered questions — our studies on globular clusters in nearby dwarf galaxies just started. The observations of NGC 1898 will help to determine whether their properties are similar to the ones found in the Milky Way, or if they have different features, due to being in a different cosmic environment.

Image Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA
#nasa #space #hubble #spothubble #spacetelescope #telescope #cluster #star #galaxy #universe #solarsystem #largemagellaniccloud #science
Via : @nasa


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This glittering ball of stars is a globular cluster lying toward the center of the Large Magellanic Cloud — one of our closest cosmic neighbors. Seen by the Hubble Space Telescope (@NASAHubble), it hosts an extremely rich population of star clusters making it an ideal laboratory for investigating star formation.
Discovered in November 1834 by British astronomer John Herschel, NGC 1898 has been scrutinized numerous times by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. Today we know that globular clusters are some of the oldest known objects in the universe and that they are relics of the first epochs of galaxy formation. While we already have a pretty good picture on the globular clusters of the Milky Way — still with many unanswered questions — our studies on globular clusters in nearby dwarf galaxies just started. The observations of NGC 1898 will help to determine whether their properties are similar to the ones found in the Milky Way, or if they have different features, due to being in a different cosmic environment.

Image Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA
#nasa #space #hubble #spothubble #spacetelescope #telescope #cluster #star #galaxy #universe #solarsystem #largemagellaniccloud #science


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#Repost @nasa
・・・
Our @NASAHubble Space Telescope detected an unusual infrared light radiating from a nearby neutron star, which forms when a massive star runs out of fuel and collapses. But what is it?

These never-seen-before features could have two possible explanations: one possibility is that there is a dusty disk surrounding the neutron star; another is that there is an energetic wind coming off the object and slamming into gas in interstellar space the neutron star is plowing through.

This animation depicts a neutron star with a disk of warm dust that produces an infrared signature as detected by Hubble. The disk wasn’t directly photographed, but one way to explain the data is by hypothesizing a disk structure that could be 18 billion miles across. The disk would be made up of material falling back onto the neutron star after the supernova explosion that created the stellar remnant.

Although neutron stars are generally studied in radio and high-energy emissions, such as X-rays, recent studies show that new and interesting information about neutron stars can also be gained by studying them in infrared light. Neutron stars are also called pulsars because their very fast rotation (typically fractions of a second, in this case 11 seconds) causes time-variable emission from light-emitting regions.

Using our upcoming James Webb Space Telescope (@NASAwebb), astronomers will be able to further explore this newly opened discovery space in the infrared to better understand neutron star evolution.

Credit: NASA, ESA, and N. Tr’Ehnl (Pennsylvania State University)

#nasa #space #hubble #spothubble #spacetelescope #telescope #cosmos #stars #galaxy #infrared #light #supernova #explosion #beautiful #universe #science #bright #xrays


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🖤🌌 #Repost @nasa
• • •
These dots of color make up one of the most comprehensive portraits yet of the universe’s evolutionary history. This mosaic, captured with the ultraviolet vision of our Hubble Space Telescope (@NASAHubble), features approximately 15,000 galaxies, about 12,000 of which are star-forming – widely distributed in time and space.
Hubble’s ultraviolet vision opens a new window on the evolving universe, tracking the birth of stars over the last 11 billion years back to the cosmos’ busiest star-forming period, which happened about 3 billion years after the big bang. Because Earth’s atmosphere filters most ultraviolet light, Hubble can provide some of the most sensitive space-based ultraviolet observations possible.

Ultraviolet light has been the missing piece to the cosmic puzzle. Now, combined with infrared and visible-light data from Hubble and other space and ground-based telescopes, astronomers have assembled one of the most comprehensive portraits yet of the universe’s evolutionary history.

Credit: NASA, ESA, P. Oesch (University of Geneva), and M. Montes (University of New South Wales)

#nasa #space #hubble #spothubble #telescope #galaxy #stars #forming #universe #solarsystem #planets #astronomers #bigbang #earth #ultraviolet #science #portrait #mosaic


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In the summer of the year 1054 AD, Chinese astronomers saw a new "guest star," that appeared six times brighter than Venus. So bright in fact, it could be seen during the daytime for several months. This "guest star" was forgotten about until 700 years later with the advent of telescopes. Astronomers saw a tentacle-like nebula in the place of the vanished star and called it the Crab Nebula. Today we know it as the expanding gaseous remnant from a star that self-detonated as a supernova, briefly shining as brightly as 400 million suns. The explosion took place 6,500 light-years away. If the blast had instead happened 50 light-years away it would have irradiated Earth, wiping out most life forms. In the late 1960s astronomers discovered the crushed heart of the doomed star, an ultra-dense neutron star that is a dynamo of intense magnetic field and radiation energizing the nebula. Astronomers therefore need to study the Crab Nebula across a broad range of electromagnetic radiation, from X-rays to radio waves. This image combines data from five different telescopes: the VLA (radio) in red; Spitzer Space Telescope (infrared) in yellow; Hubble Space Telescope (visible) in green; XMM-Newton (ultraviolet) in blue; and Chandra X-ray Observatory (X-ray) in purple.
Fallow @timm1138 and @space.horizons for more!
Credits: @nasa
#nasa #space #hubble #spothubble #galaxy #milkyway #milkywaychasers #universe #universe_dope #astrophotography #astronomy #stars #cosmos #telescopes #telescope #nightsky #cluster


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#Repost @nasa
• • • • •
This glittering ball of stars is a globular cluster lying toward the center of the Large Magellanic Cloud — one of our closest cosmic neighbors. Seen by the Hubble Space Telescope (@NASAHubble), it hosts an extremely rich population of star clusters making it an ideal laboratory for investigating star formation.
Discovered in November 1834 by British astronomer John Herschel, NGC 1898 has been scrutinized numerous times by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. Today we know that globular clusters are some of the oldest known objects in the universe and that they are relics of the first epochs of galaxy formation. While we already have a pretty good picture on the globular clusters of the Milky Way — still with many unanswered questions — our studies on globular clusters in nearby dwarf galaxies just started. The observations of NGC 1898 will help to determine whether their properties are similar to the ones found in the Milky Way, or if they have different features, due to being in a different cosmic environment.

Image Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA
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#nasa #space #hubble #spothubble #spacetelescope #telescope #cluster #star #galaxy #universe #solarsystem #largemagellaniccloud #physics #astronomy #astrophysics #science #sciencelondon #london #uk #britishscienceassociation


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This glittering ball of stars is a globular cluster lying toward the center of the Large Magellanic Cloud — one of our closest cosmic neighbors. Seen by the Hubble Space Telescope (@NASAHubble), it hosts an extremely rich population of star clusters making it an ideal laboratory for investigating star formation.
Discovered in November 1834 by British astronomer John Herschel, NGC 1898 has been scrutinized numerous times by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. Today we know that globular clusters are some of the oldest known objects in the universe and that they are relics of the first epochs of galaxy formation. While we already have a pretty good picture on the globular clusters of the Milky Way — still with many unanswered questions — our studies on globular clusters in nearby dwarf galaxies just started. The observations of NGC 1898 will help to determine whether their properties are similar to the ones found in the Milky Way, or if they have different features, due to being in a different cosmic environment.
Image Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA
#nasa #space #hubble #spothubble #spacetelescope #telescope #cluster #star #galaxy #universe #solarsystem #largemagellaniccloud #science


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#RepostSave @nasa with @repostsaveapp ・・・ Twinkle, twinkle, many stars! ⭐️ Spotted by our @NASAHubble telescope roughly in the direction of the center of the Milky Way, is this gravitationally bound collection of stars, also known as a globular cluster. Globular clusters contain hundreds of thousands of stars that are thought to have formed at roughly the same time.

Studies have shown that the globular cluster seen here is home to an aging population of stars. Most globular clusters orbiting the Milky Way are estimated to be over 10 billion years old; as a result, they contain some of the oldest stars in our galaxy, formed very early in the galaxy’s history. However, their role in galactic evolution is still a matter of study.

Credit: NASA/ESA/Hubble

#nasa #hubble #stars #stargazing #space #astronomy #spothubble #solarsystem #universe #galaxy #science #pictureoftheday #beautiful #light #picoftheday#ft


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Glowing warmly against the dark backdrop of the universe, this irregular galaxy seen by our Hubble Space Telescope (@NASAHubble) contains bright pockets of star formation. Located approximately 70 million light-years away, it’s host to a particularly interesting exploded star, also known as a supernova.

In November 2008, 14-year-old Caroline Moore from New York discovered this supernova, which made her the youngest person at the time to have discovered one. Follow-up observations by professional astronomers showed that it was peculiarly interesting in many different ways.
First, its host galaxy rarely produces supernovae. It is also one of the faintest supernovae ever observed and after the explosion it expanded very slowly, suggesting that the explosion did not release copious amounts of energy as usually expected. Astronomers have now classified it as a subclass of a Type Ia supernova, which is the explosion of a white dwarf that hungrily accretes matter from a companion star. It may have may have been the result of a partially failed supernova, explaining why the explosion failed to decimate the whole star.

Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA

#nasa #space #hubble #spothubble #universe #solarsystem #galaxy #supernova #exploded #star #irregular #beautiful #lightyears #discovery #exploration #telescope #astronomy #explosion #pictureoftheday #science


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