American History Museum@amhistorymuseum

Smithsonian's National Museum of American History. Hosts: Amelia & Jordan
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s.si.edu/Top2018

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American History Museum

Who is looking forward to a fresh start or new adventures in 2019? 👋
As we look ahead to new opportunities, we’re also looking back ... at this 1927 work incentive poster. Employers used posters like this one to encourage their staff. Happy New Year history fans!
#MondayMotivation #NewYearsEve #2019 #Bye2018 #Hello2019 #Typography #Posters #Vintage #GraphicDesign #FromTheArchives #AmericanHistory [👶✈️: Randolph Poster Collection, Archives Center]


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American History Museum

We wish we could wear this dress, designed by Ann Lowe, to one of our holiday parties. With gorg’ velvety flowers tumbling down the dress, we’d be sure to make an entrance.
Ann Lowe was called “society’s best kept secret.” Lowe's clients included the du Ponts, the Roosevelts, the Rockefellers, and the Auchinclosses (famous today for family member Jacqueline "Jackie" Bouvier, better known as First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis). It was Lowe who designed Jackie Kennedy Onassis’s wedding dress for her marriage to the future president. When a flood ruined the dress, Lowe and her team recreated it (and nine dresses for the bridal party) in less than a week, and never told the Kennedys.
Lowe’s story is one of our most read blog posts of 2018. Discover her story and other must-reads by clicking the link in the bio: s.si.edu/Top2018

#AmericanHistory #BlackHistory #WomensHistory #HiddenHerstory #CostumeHistory #TextileHistory #VintageClothing #OOTD


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American History Museum

In 1972, designer Paula Van Wagoner took on an interesting assignment: designing a new uniform for the Dallas Cowboys Cheerleaders. This sketch was one of her first attempts to craft the cheerleading team's signature look. Many of the hallmarks of Wagoner's design—boots, white shorts, and a star-spangled vest—have become iconic parts of the Dallas Cowboys Cheerleaders’ uniform. ⭐
Earlier this year, the museum collected a number of objects from the Dallas Cowboys Cheerleaders, including a copy of Wagoner's original sketch. Together, these objects chronicle the team's rise to fame in American sports. Swipe to see more of the new acquisitions. 🏈
Curator Jane Rogers described how the new objects will help the museum's interpret the history of American sports, stating: “Our collection of cheerleading material dates back to the days before Title IX guaranteed equal access for women to school sports. In those days, girls and women had few options in regard to sports, so cheerleading became an athletic-team activity for them.” You can use the link in our bio to learn more about the donation: s.si.edu/dallascowboycheerleaders

Stay tuned—this month, we'll be highlighting objects from our most popular blog posts of 2018!
#AmericanHistory #SportsHistory #WomensHistory #FootballHistory #TexasHistory #Cheerleading #Football #BestOf2018


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American History Museum

Fifinella patches like these were worn by women pilot trainees in what became the WASP (Women Airforce Service Pilots). During World War II, Disney artists created images of Disney characters for unit patches, eventually providing insignia to almost 1,300 units in the U.S. armed forces. Requests were so numerous that the studio had to set up an entire five-person unit devoted to insignia to even come close to meeting the demand. ✍️ Fifinella, the mascot for the WASPs, comes from British folklore. According to British Royal Air Force pilot lore, Fifinella was one of many winged gremlins that played havoc with their airplanes. Roald Dahl popularized the story in 1943 with illustrations provided by Walt Disney, who was given rights to the characters. ✈️ Follow the link in our bio to learn more about Disney's work with the U.S. armed forces during World War II: https://s.si.edu/ww2-disney
#AmericanHistory #WorldWar2 #WomensHistory #MilitaryHistory #EntertainmentHistory #Design #Animation #Insignia #WomensHistory #BestOf2018


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American History Museum

From remembering childhood favorites to remembering those we’ve lost, here’s our #TopNine Instagram posts of 2018.
As the year draws to a close, we’re revisiting some of your favorite stories we shared. Click the link in our bio to check out the most popular blog posts of 2018: s.si.edu/Top2018
What’s one of your favorite historic stories you’ve learned or rediscovered this year?
#AmericanHistory #TopNine #BestNine


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American History Museum

Bundle up, it’s cold outside.
Jamie Farr wore this pink beaded wool coat as Klinger on the television show, “M*A*S*H.” Klinger often sported fabulous women’s clothing on the show. His outfits were pulled from the 20th Century Fox wardrobe department, and many had appeared in earlier productions. This coat was originally worn by Betty Grable.
Check out the link in our bio to learn about Jamie Farr’s M*A*S*H experience, and the famous hand-me-downs he wore. (https://s.si.edu/2Quu2PH)
#Textiles #CostumeHistory #ClothingHistory #Vintage #VintageClothing #HollywoodHistory #EntertainmentHistory #AmericanHistory #MASH #4077


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American History Museum

Be generous in your judgment (of yourself and others) this week!
Employers used work incentive posters like this one from 1928 to encourage the behavior they wanted to see in their staff.
In D.C.? You can learn more about these posters in our new display, “Let’s Get It Right: Work Incentive Posters of the 1920s.” #MondayMotivation #SnowDay #MotivationalPoster #AmericanHistory #GraphicDesign #1920s #BusinessHistory #LaborHistory #Typography [❄️: Randolph Collection, Archives Center]


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American History Museum

“When I came back from church today, I heard the dreamlike news that Japanese airplanes had bombed Hawaiʻi. I was shocked beyond belief.” On December 7, 1941, Toku Shimomura of Seattle recorded her experience learning of the Pearl Harbor attack in her diary. “I sat in front of the radio and listened to the news all day. They said that at 6 a.m. Japan declared war on the United States. Our future has become gloomy. I pray that God will stay with us,” she wrote.
After Japan attacked Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941, and the United States entered a war in Europe and the Pacific, the nation was overcome by shock, anger, and fear—a fear exaggerated by long-standing anti-Asian prejudice. Ten weeks later President Franklin Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, under which nearly 75,000 American citizens of Japanese ancestry were taken into custody. Another 45,000 Japanese nationals living in the United States (many of whom had been long denied citizenship because of their race) were also incarcerated. To learn more click the link in our bio: https://s.si.edu/RightingAWrong
#WWII #WW2 #PearlHarbor #AmerianHistory #AsianPacificHeritage #AsianPacificAmericans #SeattleHistory #MilitaryHistory #OTD #TDIH #1940s #EO9066 #ExecutiveOrder9066 #JapaneseAmericanHeritage #WorldWarII #WorldWar2


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American History Museum

On December 7, 1941, a day which will live in infamy, nearly 200 Japanese planes attacked the U.S. military base at Pearl Harbor.
After the attack, many Americans rallied around the war effort with the patriotic cry, "Remember Pearl Harbor." Thousands of buttons or lapel pins were distributed to remind Americans of the tragic event and to solidify the war efforts.
#PearlHarbor #WW2 #WWII #MilitaryHistory #1940s #TDIH #OTD #Jewelry #AmericanHistory


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American History Museum

80-year-old shoes. 200 hours of conservation work. Dorothy’s Ruby Slippers from “The Wizard of Oz” are back on display. Objects Conservator Dawn Wallace shares why it took so long to stabilize and clean these hard-working kitten heels from the 1939 movie. See the full video at the link in our profile: https://s.si.edu/ConservationComplete 👠👠 #KeepThemRuby #RubySlippers #HollywoodHistory #FashionHistory #WizardOfOz #VintageFashion #VintageShoes


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American History Museum

New gallery coming in 2021! Our friends @slc_latino will open the Molina Family Latino Gallery, the first-ever physical space at the @Smithsonian dedicated to highlighting the U.S. Latino experience.
What will you find in the gallery when these renderings become reality? A new way to experience Latino content at the Smithsonian through physical objects, hands-on activities, and multimedia immersive experiences.
Thanks to the generous support of the Molina Family and the first founding corporate donor, Target, The Molina Family Latino Gallery will open its doors here in 2021 and we couldn’t be more excited. Until then, you can continue to engage with the Smithsonian Latino Center through its many programs and activities. Start by following them on Instagram! #LatinoHistory #LatinxHistory #HispanicHeritage #AmericanHistory


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American History Museum

As this belt buckle hints, the U.S. West figured prominently in the 1980 presidential campaign. Although neither were born there, both Ronald Reagan and George H. W. Bush became politicians of the West—Reagan in California, Bush in Texas.
Throughout his political career, Bush celebrated what he learned in Texas about himself and about his country. In his acceptance speech at the 1988 Republican National Convention, he recalled the excitement of being part of the postwar boom in America: “The war was over, and we wanted to get out and make it on our own. Those were exciting days. We lived in a little shotgun house, one room for the three of us. Worked in the oil business and then started my own. . . . People don't see their own experience as symbolic of an era but, of course, we were. And so was everyone else who was taking a chance and pushing into unknown territory with kids and a dog and a car.” Today, we join the nation in reflecting on the life and legacy of President George H. W. Bush.


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