American History Museum@amhistorymuseum

Smithsonian's National Museum of American History. Hosts: Amelia & Jordan
Legal: si.edu/termsofuse

americanhistory.si.edu/blog/2013/05/you-asked-we-answered-why-do-we-celebrate-memorial-day.html

3,187 posts 242,992 followers 753 following

American History Museum

O say can you see, by the dawn’s early light, what so proudly we hail …
This is the Star-Spangled Banner that flew over Fort McHenry during the Battle of Baltimore during the War of 1812, inspiring Francis Scott Key to write the words that would go on to become our National Anthem.
The flag was sewn by Mary Pickersgill of Baltimore. She was assisted by her daughter, Caroline, her nieces, Eliza and Margaret Young, and a 13-year-old African American indentured servant named Grace Wisher.
The Star-Spangled Banner joined the @smithsonian ‘s collections in the early 1900s. Since then, it has only left the Mall once, during World War II. After the attack on Pearl Harbor, Americans were concerned the capital may be under physical threat. Plans were made to protect a number of the Smithsonian's most precious objects. The flag and many other treasures were crated up and sent to Luray, Virginia, for safekeeping.
#BecauseOfHerStory #FlagDay #FlagFriday #FlagFacts #AmericanHistory #MarylandHistory #MarylandInFocus #MilitaryHistory #Warof1812 #WWII #WomensHistory #TextileHistory #StarSpangledBanner #WW2


47

American History Museum

Charlotte Cushman broke barriers on and off stage.
During the mid-1800s, she was celebrated as the “greatest living actress.” Like many other female actresses, she performed both female and male roles. Female actresses playing male roles was popular with male theater-goers, as male costumes usually included tights that revealed the actress’ legs. However, Cushman’s male costumes were even less revealing than her female ones, as you can see in these costumes for Cardinal Wolsey (a male role) and Queen Katharine. Her popularity came from her performance, not her appearance.
Off stage, Cushman funded and lived in a community of what she and her friends called "jolly female bachelors" or "emancipated women" who were known for producing art, wearing men's clothing, and lobbying for working women. All of the romantic relationships documented in her personal papers were with women.
#WomensHistory #🎭 #TheaterHistory #Pride #PrideMonth #LGBTQHistory #LGBTQIAHistory #AmericanHistory #CostumeHistory #BecauseOfHerStory


11

American History Museum

🎶Hello Dolly! 🎵 You’re looking swell, Dolly!🎶 Last night’s #TonyAwards put us in the mood for some Broadway history. Phyllis Diller wore this costume in a 1970 production of “Hello, Dolly!” The play made its Broadway premiere in 1964 with Carol Channing playing the leading role. That year the play won 10 Tony Awards, setting a record it would hold for 37 years.
#EntertainmentHistory #TheaterHistory #BroadwayHistory #MusicalTheater #SmithsonianMusic #CostumeHistory #AmericanHistory


22

American History Museum

Who’s ready for a parade?
This month, across the country, people will participate in Pride parades. Pride marches often trace their roots to 1970.
The first New York Pride March was held in 1970. Also known as the Christopher Street Liberation Day March, the demonstration took place on the one-year anniversary of the Stonewall uprising. “We stretched out as far as I could see, thousands of us,” recalled participant Fred Sargent. Los Angeles, Chicago, and San Francisco held Pride events that same weekend.
In 1970, the Los Angeles event was the only parade, all the other events were marches. These demonstrations have continued and changed since 1970. These photographs capture different Pride marches, parades, and demonstrations in last half-century.
#Pride #PrideMonth #LGBTQHistory#LGBTQIAHistory #AmericanHistory#LGBTQ #LGBTQIA #PrideParade#NYCHistory #NYHistory #1970 #1970s #DCPride #SmithsonianPride #🏳️‍🌈 #❤️🧡💛💚💙💜 [🏳️‍🌈: Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender (LGBT) Collection, Archives Center]


25

American History Museum

no one:
us: we declare ourselves Donut Princess 🍩🍩🍩🍩🍩 However you’re celebrating #NationalDoughnutDay, we hope you have a good one!
#NationalDonutDay #Photography #BlackAndWhitePhotography #AmericanHistory [🍩: Sally L. Steinberg Collection of Doughnut Ephemera, Archives Center]


24

American History Museum

June 6, 1944, D-Day: Thousands of Allied naval vessels and planes streamed toward Nazi-occupied France to break through Hitler's coastal defenses.
The invasion was one of the largest seaborne attacks in human history and ultimately liberated Western Europe from Nazi control. For many of the American soldiers involved, D-Day was their introduction to combat. Thousands of soldiers died that day.
Robert Capa captured this image of American troops landing at Omaha Beach. Capa was one of two magazine war correspondents allowed to join the U.S. troops landing on the shores of Normandy.
#DDay #D-Day #WW2 #WWII #MilitaryHistory #AmericanHistory #PhotographyHistory #BlackAndWhitePhotography #TDIH #OTD


44

American History Museum

Educator. Suffragist. Institution-builder. Nannie Helen Burroughs dedicated her career to preparing African American women to lead—both in the professional world and public life. As a young woman, Burroughs spearheaded efforts to form the Women's Convention (WC) Auxiliary to the National Baptist Convention. Swipe to see her Women's Convention conference badge, which features the organization's slogan: "The world for Christ. Women Arise. He calleth for thee." ⛪
With more than a million members, the Women's Convention became a platform African American women used to ensure their voices were heard—both within the denomination and throughout the world. As the Women's Convention's corresponding secretary—a position she held for more than forty years—Burroughs was a driving force behind its growth. As historian Evelyn Brooks Higginbotham writes, during the organization's first year, Burroughs "labored 365 days, traveled 2,125 miles, delivered 215 speeches, organized 12 societies, wrote 9,235 letters, and received 4,820 letters." Burroughs later served as the organization's president. With the support of the National Baptist Convention as well as Washington D.C.'s African American community, Burroughs founded the National Trade and Professional School for Women and Girls in the nation's capital. 🏫
For Burroughs, women's suffrage was an inextricably linked to African Americans' struggle for freedom, equality, and full citizenship. Writing for "The Crisis" in 1915, she told readers that "[w]hen the ballot is put into the hands of the American woman the world is going to get a correct estimate of the Negro woman. It will find her a tower of strength of which poets have never sung, orators have never spoken, and scholars have never written.” 🗳️ #19thAt100 #BecauseOfHerStory #WomensSuffrage #WomanSuffrage #WomenVote100 #HerVote100 #RightfullyHers #WomensHistory #AmericanHistory #VoteHistory #PoliticalHistory #ReligiousHistory #EducationHistory #AfricanAmericanHistory #CivilRightsHistory #AmericanDemocracy #NationWeBuildTogether #FreedomStruggle


23

American History Museum

100 years ago today, Congress approves the 19th Amendment. The next day, this gold pen is used to sign the amendment's joint resolution. After the signing ceremony, members of Congress presented the pen to representatives of the National American Woman Suffrage Association, who later donated it to the @smithsonian. The 19th Amendment then went through a ratification battle that lasted for more than a year, culminating in its ratification in August 1920. 🗳️ The 19th Amendment was only one milestone in the longer history of women's fight for the ballot. Before its approval, many U.S. states had already granted women full or partial voting rights. Modeled after the 15th Amendment, the 19th Amendment did not explicitly guarantee women the right to vote in the United States. Instead, it stipulated that citizens' right to vote could not be "denied or abridged...on account of sex." After the amendment's ratification, many more women were able to vote in U.S. elections. Others—especially women of color—were kept from the polls through a combination of violence, intimidation, and other restrictions like poll taxes, literacy tests, complex registration systems, and whites-only primaries. Further legislation, court victories, and social movements were needed to ensure that all American women would be able to exercise their right to vote. ☑️ Today, we and other organizations will be marking this 100th anniversary for the 19th Amendment by sharing objects and stories that explore the past, present, and future of women's suffrage. We hope you'll join us!
#19thAt100 #BecauseOfHerStory #WomensSuffrage #WomanSuffrage #WomenVote100 #HerVote100 #RightfullyHers #WomensHistory #AmericanHistory #SuffrageHistory #VoteHistory #PoliticalHistory #CivilRightsHistory #FreedomStruggle #AmericanDemocracy #NationWeBuildTogether


21

American History Museum

🎶 She’s good enough to love and adore you, She’s good enough to bear your troubles for you. .. She’s good enough to be your baby’s mother. And she’s good enough to vote with you!” 🎶
Yes, this is a real song. In the early 1900s, suffragists used songs like this one to convince (male) voters and elected officials to vote for women’s suffrage.
Tomorrow is the 100th anniversary of Congress approving the 19th Amendment and sending it to the states for ratification. Join us as we explore the #19thAt100.
#WomensSuffrage #WomenVote100 #HerVote100 #RightfullyHers #WomensHistory #AmericanHistory #SuffrageHistory #VoteHistory #PoliticalHistory #American Democracy #NationWeBuildTogether #MusicMonday #SmithsonianMusic #MusicHistory #EntertainmentHistory #SheetMusic #BecauseOfHerStory


23

American History Museum

Do you wear your pride on your sleeve?
Buttons raise awareness, support a cause, or identify with a community. The museum has collected over 400 buttons representing a snapshot of LGBTQ+ visual and material culture spanning three decades from the 1970s through the 1990s.
What buttons do you wear?
#Pride #PrideMonth #LGBTQHistory #LGBTQIAHistory #AmericanHistory #CostumeHistory #PoliticalHistory #LGBTQ #LGBTQIA #PinbackButtons #🏳️‍🌈 #❤️🧡💛💚💙💜 #Pride2019


34

American History Museum

200 years ago today, on May 31, 1819, Walt Whitman is born.
Whitman is best remembered today as a poet, known for his works including “Leaves of Grass,” “O Captain! My Captain!,” and “The Wound Dresser.” During the Civil War, Whitman visited wounded and sick soldiers in Washington, D.C. hospitals.
Today he is also remembered for his romantic relationships with men—making him an icon in LGBTQ history to some. Here he is featured on the cover of the July 1954 magazine of One Magazine, a magazine published by a LGBTQ rights group.
#WaltWhitman #TDIH #OTD #AmericanHistory #LGBTQHistory #Pride #Pride2019 #DCPride #DCHistory #Whitman200 #🏳️‍🌈 #❤🧡💛💚💙💜


9

American History Museum

The first #MemorialDay observances were organized by women and African Americans to commemorate fallen Civil War soldiers.
@smithsonian shared the story of those first days of remembrance, writing: “During the war, some women began decorating soldiers' graves with flowers, a custom which may have been borrowed from German Catholic observances on All Saints' Day.
Before an official #MemorialDay, there was Decoration Day. Dozens of cities in the North and South claim to have been the birthplace of the Decoration Day tradition, but it had become an annual spring tradition in many cities by the end of the war.
On May 1, 1865, freedman's relief groups and formerly enslaved people in Charleston, South Carolina, organized to decorate the graves of the 257 Union prisoners who died at a Confederate prison. Thousands gathered to sing hymns, set flowers, and give readings in honor of the soldiers’ sacrifice.” To learn more, click the link in our bio.
#MemorialDay #DecorationDay #AmericanHistory #MilitaryHistory


7