Andrea Frazzetta@andrea_frazzetta

Photographer // Contributor to
The New York Times Magazine -
National Geographic Travel - Based in Milan - Represented by INSTITUTE
@instituteartist

http://www.andreafrazzetta.com/

A miner's headlamp cuts through the darkness and volcanic gas. Miners often begin their work at night before the sun's heat becomes too oppressive.
Mount Ijen, on the Island of Java, Indonesia, hosts one of the last remaining active sulfur mines in the world.
Every day, miners make the arduous trek up Ijen’s 9,000-foot slopes under the cover darkness before descending another 3,000 feet into the crater. Enveloped in toxic fumes and heat, they chip away at the hardened blocks and carry 150 to 200-pound loads back up the crater twice a day.
“Sulfur Road” my latest assignment for National Geographic is online, check it on NatGeo website.
@andrea_frazzetta @natgeotravel @instituteartist #natgeotravel #ijen #java #indonesia #sulfur #miners


31

Sunarto, 41 years old, carries a load of sulfur out of the crater. Mount Ijen, on the Island of Java, Indonesia, hosts one of the last remaining active sulfur mines in the world, and while its otherworldly vistas have captivated scientists and travelers for more than two centuries, in recent decades, the miners themselves have become a controversial tourist attraction.
Every day, miners make the arduous trek up Ijen’s 9,000-foot slopes under the cover darkness before descending another 3,000 feet into the crater. Enveloped in toxic fumes and heat, they chip away at the hardened blocks and carry 150 to 200-pound loads back up the crater twice a day.
“Sulfur Road” my latest assignment for National Geographic is online, check it on NatGeo website.
@andrea_frazzetta @natgeotravel @instituteartist #natgeotravel #ijen #java #indonesia #sulfur #miners


32

Mount Ijen, on the Island of Java, Indonesia, hosts one of the last remaining active sulfur mines in the world. Since 1968, the sulfur miners have ventured into this unpredictable labyrinth of gas clouds and superheated fumaroles to extract “devil’s gold” and carry it back down the mountain. Ijen’s half-mile turquoise crater lake takes on an eerie glow in the darkness. Deceptively beautiful, it has a pH lower than that of battery acid—the largest acid lake on Earth, caustic enough to dissolve metal.
“Sulfur Road” my latest assignment for National Geographic is online, check it on NatGeo website.
@andrea_frazzetta @natgeotravel @instituteartist #natgeotravel #ijen #java #indonesia #sulfur #miners #drone


22

A thick veil of smoke erases the sky over Mount Ijen, the scent of burnt matches saturates the air.
The noxious material that seeps from the bowels of East Java’s active volcano is incongruous with human life—it stings the eyes, burns the lungs, and corrodes the skin. But since 1968, the sulfur miners of Mount Ijen have ventured into this unpredictable labyrinth of gas clouds and superheated fumaroles to extract “devil’s gold” and carry it back down the mountain—a portrait of bone-crushing physical labor.
Here a Miner carry sulfur out of the Kawah Ijen crater.
Every day, miners make the arduous trek up Ijen’s 9,000-foot slopes under the cover darkness before descending another 3,000 feet into the crater. Enveloped in toxic fumes and heat, they chip away at the hardened blocks and carry 150 to 200-pound loads back up the crater twice a day.
“Sulfur Road” my latest assignment for National Geographic is on line, check it on NatGeo website.
@andrea_frazzetta @natgeotravel @instituteartist #natgeotravel #ijen #java #indonesia #sulfur #miners


20

Working close to condensation pipes miners gathers sulfur from Kawah Ijen, molten sulfur burning blue in the background.
Sulfur combusts on contact with air to create stunning blue lava-like rivers of light in the Kawah Ijen crater on the island of Java.
Mount Ijen’s gorgeous vistas have captivated travelers for centuries, but in recent years, its sulfur mine has become a controversial tourist attraction.
@andrea_frazzetta @natgeotravel @instituteartist #natgeotravel #ijen #java #indonesia #blueflames


47

#Repost @natgeotravel
・・・
photo by @andrea_frazzetta // “Sulfur Road” my latest assignment for National Geographic is online today.
Mount Ijen, on the Island of Java, Indonesia, hosts one of the last remaining active sulfur mines in the world, and while its otherworldly vistas have captivated scientists and travelers for more than two centuries, in recent decades, the miners themselves have become a controversial tourist attraction.
Hadis, portrayed in this picture, is 36 years old, and he has been a full-time miner for 10 years.
Every day, miners make the arduous trek up Ijen’s 9,000-foot slopes under the cover darkness before descending another 3,000 feet into the crater. Enveloped in toxic fumes and heat, they chip away at the hardened blocks and carry 150 to 200-pound loads back up the crater twice a day.
Check it on NatGeo website and follow @andrea_frazzetta to know more about this project #natgeotravel #ijen #java #indonesia #blueflames


46

A People in Limbo, many living entirely on the water.
Floating villages spread across the surface of the Mekong River’s waterways, playing host to ethnic Vietnamese whose status in Cambodian society is perpetually adrift.
In this picture, Yao Bu Dung makes her way home through the marsh with her child before a storm reaches the village of Kampong Luong.
“Adrift” is my last work for The New York Times Magazine. Check it out on the NYTmag website.
@nytmag @instituteartist #cambodia #refugees #adrift


39

A People in Limbo, Many Living Entirely on the Water.
Floating villages spread across the surface of the Mekong River’s waterways, playing host to ethnic Vietnamese whose status in Cambodian society is perpetually adrift.
Here an arial view of Kampong Luong, a group of floating villages on the southern shoreline of the Tonlé Sap Lake.
“Adrift” is my last work for The New York Times Magazine. Check it out on the NYTmag website.
@nytmag @instituteartist #cambodia #refugees #adrift #drone


7

My latest work for The New York Times Magazine is out today!
and I’m very proud to be on the pages of the Magazine for two weeks in a row.
“Adrift - Persecuted on Land, a Minority in Cambodia Takes Shelter on the Water."
Wonderful piece by @benmauk .
Huge thanks to @staceylbaker and the team of the @nytmag , the online publication is great! check it out at the NYT Magazine web site.
@nytmag @instituteartist #cambodia #adrift


34

This week in print my work for The New York Times Magazine, “In Her Orbit”. For this assignment, I’ve been in Chile following the legendary Nathalie Cabrol and her team at the SETI Institute. Cabrol is an explorer, an astrobiologist and a planetary geologist specializing in Mars. She is the director of the Carl Sagan Center at the SETI Institute, the nonprofit organization that seeks to explore, understand and explain the origin of life in the universe.
This is the story of the Seti’s last mission. A 26 days expedition to Chile’s high-altitude deserts to test methods of detecting life on Mars.
In this picture an expedition member drilling the soil.
@nytmag @instituteartist @setiinstitute #Chile #mars


12

For The New York Times Magazine, I shoot an incredible story from Chile, following the legendary Nathalie Cabrol and her team at the SETI Institute of NASA, which seeks to explore, understand and explain the origin of life in the universe. In this picture the night sky over Salar De Pajonales.
I’m particularly proud of this work - in print this week - and is very nice to be back in another "Voyages" special issue of the Magazine. A heartfelt thanks to @kathyryan and @staceylbaker for assigned me this.
@andrea_frazzetta @nytmag @instituteartist #Chile


43

#Repost @nytmag (@get_repost)
・・・
@andrea_frazzetta photographed Nathalie Cabrol, an explorer, astrobiologist and planetary geologist specializing in Mars. She is also the director of the Carl Sagan Center at the SETI institute, which seeks to explore, understand and explain the origin of life in the universe. To do this, Cabrol travels to some of the world’s most extreme and dangerous environments in search of organisms that live in conditions analogous to those on Mars. The surface of Mars is exposed to such harmful radiation that no life can survive on it today. But, Cabrol says, life might still be hiding underground. Exploration is what sets her imagination aflame: “I breathe it, imagine it every day of my life, I dream about it at night.” Her work is about much more than trying to answer the old question, “Are we alone?” Billions of years ago, rocks thrown off asteroid and comet collisions with Earth reached Mars, and vice versa. Ancient rocks from the time Mars’s crust cooled down are still present on that planet’s surface, and if we share our ancestry with #Mars, traces of our own planet’s life might still be found there. “Mars may hold that secret for us,” Cabrol says. “This is why Mars is so special to us.” Get the full story, and more from our #voyages issue with the link in our bio.


16

The end of the page