Biennale of Sydney@biennalesydney

Behind-the-scenes of Australia's largest and most exciting contemporary visual arts event.
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Biennale of Sydney

'The Aboriginal Memorial', at Pier 2/3, 7th Biennale of Sydney, 1988.
Produced by Ramingining artists in collaboration with Djon Mundine OAM, ‘The Aboriginal Memorial’ is an enduring statement of Indigenous agency, cultural resilience and strength. The installation of 200 hollow log coffins commemorates all Indigenous people who, since 1788, have lost their lives defending their land.

Commissioned by the inaugural director of the National Gallery Australia (NGA), James Mollison AO, the work was first exhibited at the 7th Biennale of Sydney. It is now permanently installed in the foyer of the NGA.

On 11 October at 6pm, the NGA will recognise the 30th anniversary of ‘The Aboriginal Memorial’. Senior Ramingining men, Roy Burrnyila and Bobby Bununggurr, will conduct a performance at ‘The Aboriginal Memorial’ followed by a conversation between Director of the NGA, Nick Mitzevich, and the conceptual producer for The Aboriginal Memorial, Djon Mundine OAM, in the James O Fairfax theatre.

A symposium on the ongoing significance of 'The Aboriginal Memorial' will take place at the NGA on Friday 12 October and Saturday 13 October.

https://nga.gov.au/symposia/memorialpoles/default.cfm
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Image: Ramingining Artist Community, ‘The Aboriginal Memorial’, 1987–88, 200 hollow log coffins, natural earth pigments on wood. Collection of the National Gallery of Australia, Canberra. Purchased with the assistance of funds from the National Gallery of Australia admission charges in 1897. Installation view at the 7th Biennale of Sydney. Image from the Biennale of Sydney Archive. Courtesy the artists


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Biennale of Sydney

Past Biennale of Sydney artists Jonathan Jones and John Mawurndjul are just two of the many artists now showing at @uts_art as part of 'Void', a group show curated by Emily McDaniel. 'Void' brings together contemporary Aboriginal artists from across the country to investigate the void as a spatial notion, occupied by personal, historical and ancestral significance. #UTSART #Void #BiennaleofSydney
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Jonathan Jones, 'untitled (oysters and tea cups)', 2012, oysters and tea cups, dimensions variable. Installation view of the 18th Biennale of Sydney (2012) at Cockatoo Island. Courtesy the artist. This project was made possible through the generous support of Amanda Love. The artist wishes to acknowledge Gadigal elder Allen Madden and Eora elder Peter McKenzie. Photograph: Sebastian Kriete


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Biennale of Sydney

The Biennale of Sydney is launching into spring with colourful canapés and fresh flavours by our incredible catering partner @gastronomyaust.
#BiennaleofSydney #gastronomy #sydneycatering #sydneyfoodie
Photograph: Oliver Geier


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Biennale of Sydney

Biennale of Sydney job opportunity!
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The Biennale of Sydney is seeking a highly skilled Partnerships Manager who will be responsible for developing and managing relations with the Biennale’s corporate partners. Applications close 5pm, Monday 15 October 2018.

See our website for details.


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Biennale of Sydney

Pick up a copy of @artlink_magazine September Issue, ‘Human Flow’, featuring Ai Weiwei’s ‘Law of the Journey’ for the 21st Biennale of Sydney! ~
“This issue responds to ideas of human flow, trade and transit in the information age, and the role of artists as social agents, antagonists and radicants”. #biennaleofsydney #aiweiwei


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Biennale of Sydney

Don’t miss 20th Biennale of Sydney artists Cécile B. Evans and Korakrit Arunanondchai now showing @artspacesydney as part of THE PUBLIC BODY .03.

Cécile’s practice explores the intersection between the online world and our physical reality. Korakrit’s pastiche of styles and mediums celebrates the blurring of fantasy and reality, science and incorporeality, art and life.
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Cécile B. Evans, ‘Hyperlinks or It Didn't Happen’, 2014, HD video, loose images, 22:30 mins. Animation and effects: Tom Kemp. Animation for PHIL: Jono Symmonds. 3D model for PHIL: Hossein Diba. 3D renders: Andres Parody. Rendering: RenderFarm NL. Music: Mati Gavriel . Installation view (2016) at Cockatoo Island for the 20th Biennale of Sydney. Photograph: Ben Symon. Courtesy the artist and Barbara Seiler, Zürich. Supported by the Arts Council of England
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Korakrit Arunanondchai, ‘Painting with history in a room filled with people with funny names 3’, 2015–16, HD video, denim, foam, wood, 24:55 mins. Installation view (2016) at Cockatoo Island for the 20th Biennale of Sydney. Photograph: Ben Symons. Courtesy the artist; C L E A R I N G, New York and Brussels; and Carlos/Ishikawa, London. This version was created for the 20th Biennale of Sydney. This project was made possible with assistance from Dr Clinton Ng
#thepublicbody #biennaleofsydney


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Biennale of Sydney

Influenced by the work of artists such as Ian Burn, Mel Ramsden and Jenny Holzer, and the films of Claude Lanzmann, 'Untitled wall drawing' attends to some of the many trajectories of twentieth-century history, with a recurring focus on the narratives of colonisation that often govern boundary-making and continue to shape the contemporary world.
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Tom Nicholson, 'Untitled wall drawing', 2009–18 (detail), pencil wall drawing, dimensions variable. Drawing realised with assistance from Ernest Aaron and Lauren Burrow. Collection of the Museum of Contemporary Art Australia, purchased with funds provided by the MCA Foundation, 2013. Installation view of the 21st Biennale of Sydney (2018) at the Museum of Contemporary Art Australia. Photograph: Zan Wimberley. Courtesy the artist


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Biennale of Sydney

Tom Nicholson has described his work 'Untitled wall drawing', 2009–18 as ‘an attempt to address how words bear memory: the slowness of words (as they accumulate in us as we accumulate their meanings), their economy (the capacity of words to describe across vast stretches of time and space), and a kind of withdrawal (where words would describe a dispassionate even bureaucratic relation to the world they name).
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Tom Nicholson, 'Untitled wall drawing', 2009–18, pencil wall drawing, dimensions variable. Drawing realised with assistance from Ernest Aaron and Lauren Burrow. Collection of the Museum of Contemporary Art Australia, purchased with funds provided by the MCA Foundation, 2013. Installation view of the 21st Biennale of Sydney (2018) at the Museum of Contemporary Art Australia. Photograph: Zan Wimberley. Courtesy the artist


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Biennale of Sydney

Part of the @MCA_Australia Collection, Tom Nicholson's 'Untitled wall drawing', 2009–18, exhibited as part of the recent 21st #BiennaleofSydney, is a chronological list, handwritten in pencil on the gallery wall, documenting instances of the creation of national boundaries since Australian Federation in 1901.
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Tom Nicholson, 'Untitled wall drawing', 2009–18 (detail), pencil wall drawing, dimensions variable. Drawing realised with assistance from Ernest Aaron and Lauren Burrow. Collection of the Museum of Contemporary Art Australia, purchased with funds provided by the MCA Foundation, 2013. Installation view of the 21st Biennale of Sydney (2018) at the Museum of Contemporary Art Australia. Photograph: Zan Wimberley. Courtesy the artist


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Biennale of Sydney

Congregating at Sydney Town Hall, participants in Akira Takayama's 21st #BiennaleofSydney project were welcomed one by one to walk to the stage along a specially constructed 'hanamichi', a raised path that is a traditional element of Kabuki Theatre. Meaning ‘the road of the flower’, the hanamichi is both a means of entering and exiting the stage and an integral part of the performance.
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Akira Takayama, 'Our Songs - Sydney Kabuki Project', 2018, video documentation of performances that took place on 28 January 2018, 250 mins. Filmmaker: Hikaru Fujii. Commissioned by the Biennale of Sydney with generous support from the Neilson Foundation and generous assistance from the Japan Foundation; the Australia-Japan Foundation of the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade; and Mami Kataoka. Installation view of the 21st Biennale of Sydney (2018) at 4A Center for Contemporary Asian Art. Photograph: Zan Wimberley. Courtesy the artist


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Biennale of Sydney

'My mother taught me this song in an effort to encourage me to practice Mandarin after we migrated. That plan didn't work but the song has stayed with me, especially the first line which goes, "Don't ask me where I've come from". I sometimes think of that lyric when people ask me where I'm from or whether I feel more Chinese or Australian. As if identity can be boiled down so simply to geography'. Oliva Shen, Olive Tree
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Inspired by Kabuki Theatre, a 400-year-old form of Japanese theatre, Akira Takayama invited residents of Sydney, people who have come from across Australia and around the world, to share their family stories and cultural traditions through song.
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Akira Takayama, 'Our Songs - Sydney Kabuki Project', 2018, video documentation of performances that took place on 28 January 2018, 250 mins. Filmmaker: Hikaru Fujii. Commissioned by the Biennale of Sydney with generous support from the Neilson Foundation and generous assistance from the Japan Foundation; the Australia-Japan Foundation of the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade; and Mami Kataoka. Installation view of the 21st Biennale of Sydney (2018) at 4A Center for Contemporary Asian Art. Photograph: Zan Wimberley. Courtesy the artist


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Biennale of Sydney

Theatre director #AkiraTakayama creates projects that challenge the conventions of traditional theatre. For the recent 21st #BiennaleofSydney at @4A_Aus, Takayama presented 'Our Songs – Sydney Kabuki Project', 2018, a single-channel video installation documenting a performative event that occurred at Sydney Town Hall's Centennial Hall on Sunday, 28 January 2018.
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Akira Takayama, 'Our Songs - Sydney Kabuki Project', 2018, video documentation of performances that took place on 28 January 2018, 250 mins. Filmmaker: Hikaru Fujii. Commissioned by the Biennale of Sydney with generous support from the Neilson Foundation and generous assistance from the Japan Foundation; the Australia-Japan Foundation of the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade; and Mami Kataoka. Installation view of the 21st Biennale of Sydney (2018) at 4A Center for Contemporary Asian Art. Photograph: Zan Wimberley. Courtesy the artist


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