David Chancellor@chancellordavid

Mapping that jagged and bloody line where Man and Beast meet for @natgeo and others.

davidchancellor.com/

911 posts 100,047 followers 823 following

David Chancellor

Please read the caption, thanks to all those who engaged with this issue ❤️💚👍🏿👍🏼 - Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid - a black rhino killed in the north of Liwonde National Park, Malawi, the poacher sliced off its face, is held by a ranger from African Parks @africanparksnetwork - BEIJING (REUTERS) - China has postponed the lifting of a ban on the trade of rhino horn and tiger parts for medicine and other uses, the government said today, Monday (Nov 12), after a storm of protest from conservation groups over a plan to water down the decades-old prohibition. In October, the State Council issued a circular replacing a 1993 ban on the trade of tiger bones and rhinoceros horn, opening up exceptions under "special circumstances", including medical “research” - lifting of the ban would have been disastrous for endangered rhino and tiger populations globally, which are already under critical pressure from a black market supplying the traditional medicine trade; even if the animal parts were only sourced from those bred in captivity, it would most certainly have resulted in increased poaching of wild populations pushing them closer to extinction. China banned trade in tiger bones and rhino horns 25 years ago as part of global efforts to save the animals, that ban is now back in place. Thank you to all those brave men and women who put their lives on the line to protect the planets wildlife. I hope by reversing this decision China will as a result be saving many many lives across all species, including our own. Please share and spread at least a little good news 💚💚 @africanparksnetwork @thephotosociety @everydayextinction @natgeo #notrade #noextinction


300

David Chancellor

Golden eagle chick, on Invermark, Cairngorm National Park, Scotland - these guys are incredibly important to the ecosystem and yet many in the highlands see them as pests as they take large numbers of grouse, rabbit, hare,and young deer given the opportunity. We climbed down to this nest towards the end of July accompanying the licensed ringer who weighed, measured and ringed both the chicks in this nest; and yes he is very much watching me, I was after all pretty much sharing his nest 😏💚❤️Both have now fledged and will compliment the biodiversity of this region. It’s vital that estates such as this support these populations - final selects editing a gamekeepers life for @geomagazin documenting life and death in the highlands of Scotland #cairngormsnationalpark #invermark #scotland #agamekeeperslife


39

David Chancellor

Garry @maclennangarry #agamekeeperslife fighting fires on Invermark, Cairngorm National Park, Scotland - final selects from #agamekeeperslife for @geomagazin story by @gesagottschalk #cairngormsnationalpark #invermark #scotland


4

David Chancellor

I am constantly in awe of those who live off the land. We are increasingly divorced from both the sources of our food, and the work of those who toil to produce it. Tough men and women with warm souls - Alan the shepherd, working his flock on Invermark, Cairngorm National Park, Scotland - final selects for a gamekeepers life @geomagazin written by @gesagottschalk #invermark #cairngormsnationalpark #scotland #agamekeeperslife


16

David Chancellor

Alan the shepherd shearing his flock, on Invermark, Cairngorm National Park, Scotland - in the final selects - a gamekeepers life for @geomagazin @gesagottschalk #cairngormsnationalpark #invermark #scotland #agamekeeperslife


13

David Chancellor

clouds over the Cairngorms.
-
-
Astonishment is in the skies;
The gliding waters murmur o’er
Songs that are their own surprise;
The trees ne’er looked like this before.
Thine is the ravishment they wear.
I turn from thee in such content
That where I go thou still art there,
And all the world with thee is blent.
-
-
Nan Shepherd - in the Cairngorms.
Editing a gamekeepers life for @geomagazin #cairngormsnationalpark #invermark #scotland #agamekeeperslife


18

David Chancellor

throwing stones into Loch Lee, on Invermark, Cairngorm National Park, Scotland - editing a gamekeepers life for @geomagazin story by @gesagottschalk #cairngormsnationalpark #scotland #agamekeeperslife


38

David Chancellor

Greg with his crow, on Invermark, Cairngorm National Park, Scotland - editing a gamekeepers life for @geomagazin @gesagottschalk #cairngormsnationalpark #scotland #agamekeeperslife


18

David Chancellor

a chilly Finley, Cairngorm National Park, Scotland - from a gamekeepers life for @geomagazin @gesagottschalk editing #cairngormsnationalpark #scotland #agamekeeperslife


11

David Chancellor

Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid - This is a skeleton of the world’s rarest tiger subspecies The South China Tiger - The South China tiger population was estimated to number 4,000 individuals in the early 1950s. In the next few decades, thousands were killed as the subspecies was hunted as a pest. Although the Chinese government banned hunting in 1979, by 1996 the population was estimated to be just 30-80 individuals. Today it is considered by scientists to be “functionally extinct,” as it has not been sighted in the wild for more than 25 years; perhaps 100 remain alive in captivity. In an enormous setback for wildlife conservation, China announced on the 29.10.18 that it will allow hospitals to use tiger bone and rhino horn from captive-bred animals for traditional medicine. The decision reverses a decades-old ban that has been instrumental in preventing the extinction of endangered tigers and rhinos. South China tigers are a reminder that the threat against the planets wildlife is a very real and urgent one as both human and wildlife lives will once more be extinguished like a candles flame simply for a bag of bones and a bit of old toe nail. @natgeo @thephotosociety @everydayextinction #southchinatiger #notrade #noextinction


47

David Chancellor

Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid - Amur tiger, Russia’s Far East - I thought it worth following on with another of the planets magnificent creatures that will be directly and catastrophically effected by China’s extraordinary decision on the 29.10.19 - if you are not aware of that decision please do make an effort to be aware - Russia’s Far East is home to 95 percent of the global population of Amur tigers; I was lucky enough to work there in 2005. A census that year showed that there were between 423 to 502 individuals. A decade later, according to an interim survey released by the russian government, the population had increased to 540 individuals. Recent anti-poaching efforts have been integral to the rise in tiger numbers, with tougher punishments and the introduction of criminal charges for the illegal hunting, storage and trafficking of endangered animals and their parts. Poaching is the greatest threat to wild tigers today with tiger parts still in high demand throughout Asia. In the 1940s, the population of Amur tigers fell to just 40 animals, but the population was brought back from the brink through conservation efforts and a ban on tiger hunting. Interestingly, and worryingly, a broad genetic sampling of 95 wild Russian tigers found markedly low genetic diversity, with the effective population size extraordinarily low in comparison to the census population size; with the population behaving as if it were just 27–35 individuals. This reflects the recent population crash of the 1940s and correlated to low documented cub survivorship to independence in the Russian Far East, and the fact that more than 90% of the population occurs in the Sikhote Alin mountain region, and there is little genetic exchange (movement of Tigers) across the development corridor which separates this sub-population from the much smaller subpopulation found in southwest Primorye province. This low genetic diversity is becoming an increasing problem across a multitude of species as populations crash, and are then brought back from the brink of extinction. To see more of my work and projects follow me here @chancellordavid @natgeo @thephotosociety @everydayextinction


64

David Chancellor

Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid - Rhino farm, outside of Kerksdorp, North West Province, South Africa - This may help in answering many of the comments on my last post as a result of China’s recent decision. I do aim to address them all. As far as what can be done, please follow on, I’m not currently aware of any process to reverse this, others may know better than me - here’s the process - Rhino dehorning is a simple 20 minute procedure that is performed by a veterinarian while the rhino is anaesthetised. The horn is removed just above the growth point, the horn is composed mainly of keratin (the same as our fingernails) and is similar to a vet trimming a horses hoof. The horn will grow back at a rate in excess of I kg/year for males and 0.6kg/year females. As rhino live on average for 35-40 years they could effectively produce 8-10 horns in their lifetime, or about 60kg of horn. Here the largest rhino farm in the world, with more than 2000 rhino's has been systematically dehorning rhinos for years, employing a full-time vet working 52 weeks a year dehorning rhino. A full-time security force protecting rhino, and farm workers feeding the every increasing stock with lucerne and feed pellets. They strongly believe that legalising the international trade in rhino horn is the solution to the current rhino poaching crisis; currently domestic trade only is legally permitted within South Africa. Rhino’s are one of Africa’s natural resources, an iconic species that many believe should remain in the ‘wild’ and not be farmed and restricted to Zoo’s. Others believe that on a continent fraught with poverty, hardship, famine, draught, war and starvation, we should be looking to increase our natural resources at every opportunity and framing presents such an opportunity. China’s announcement on the 29.10.18 can only increase demand for both rhino, and tiger products and in association numerous other species - See more here: https://news.nationalgeographic.com/2017/08/wildlife-watch-rhino-horn-south-africa-auction/ @natgeo @everydayextinction @thephotosociety


121