Everyday Extinction@everydayextinction

The 6th extinction of global biodiversity is underway. Photographers around the world document its causes, effects and solutions. #everydayextinction

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Everyday Extinction

Image by @sean_gallagher_photo An Amazon milk frog (Trachycephalus resinifictrix) photographed in Beijing, China in an exotic pet breeding centre. The Amazon milk frog has a wide range, founding tropical primary rainforests in countries including Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia and Brazil. According to the IUCN, "Local populations are no doubt impacted by forest conversion, clear cutting, selective logging, and human settlement. However, overall this species is not significantly threatened." The global trade in exotic species for the pet industry is led by Europe and North America, but a growing industry in China is contributing to the worldwide demand, putting pressure on already threatened species and vulnerable ecosystems. --- This image was taken as part of Sean Gallagher's project on the rise in popularity of exotic pets in China, published as a short film with @NatGeo and as a photo-series with the @Guardian Newspaper, supported by the @PulitzerCenter. #everydayextinction #extinction #china #beijing #frogs #exoticpets @natgeoimagecollection


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Everyday Extinction

@lauren.o.lambert Kathy Herrick and Carolyn Castiglione, volunteers with Mass Audubon, search Indian Neck beach on Cape Cod during a blustery November night just after the high tide in search of endangered cold-stunned sea turtles. “In a world with what can look like so much bad its nice to help the animals we can. It’s fulfilling,” says Castiglione. The number of strandings has risen drastically over the past five years because ocean temperatures are warming. Cape Cod, which is in the Gulf of Maine is the fastest-warming body of water in the world and waters aren’t getting colder until later in the fall every year. Sea turtles feed here in the summer months and when temperatures drop to around 50 degrees, they head south and become trapped by the Cape’s hook-like shape, which Tony LaCasse from the New England Aquarium calls “The Deadly Bucket,” causing chronic hypothermia and in some cases death.
@nationalwildlife @massaudubon @newenglandaquarium @audubonsociety @ilcp_photographers
#seaturtle #kempsridley #endangeredspecies #ocean #massachusetts #environmentalscience #womenphotographer #conservation #conservationphotography #ocean #turtle #capecod #animalrescue #wildlifephotography #wildliferescue #wildliferehab #photography #photojournalism #documentaryphotography #environmentalphotography


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Everyday Extinction

Photo by @sebastiandido for @everydayextinction
The Pink River Dolphins (Inia geoffrensis) has entered the list of endangered species again after a 15 year evaluation done by the @fundacionomacha in the Amazon river in Colombia and the Mamiraúa river in Brazil. This unique species is threatened by poachers who use their meat as bait for “mota” fishes and pollution done by ilegal mining upstream of the amazonian rivers. The current situation in the region seems to be getting worse as deforestation and human development increase at an alarming rate. The need for political action to protect this animal will be a key factor in the conservation of the species in the upcoming years. Unfortunately, the current environmental actions done by the Colombian and Brazilian governments do little or nothing to diminish the population decrease. For more info about this species threats and how to preserve them check out @fundacionomacha
Photo taken in the Palmari Reserve in Brazil. .
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#everydayextinction #conservation #dolphin #amazon #colombia #brazil #dji #djiglobal #drone #nature #conservationphtography #extinction


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Everyday Extinction

Image by Sergio Pitamitz - @pitamitz / Over the past few years there has been a incredible increase in rhino poaching and one of the measures applied to save the species is the dehorning, a temporary measure of deterring poachers to kill a rhino for its horn. Although is a really effective practice, it must be coupled with an active control of the territory by anti-poaching units, as in Limpopo-Lipadi - a reserve in Botswana bordering with South Africa - where I shot this image of dehorned white rhinos. Botswana use to be a safe place for wildlife but unfortunately the poaching activity in the country has increased in the last couple of years, so the wildlife management decided to dehorn the rhinos roaming in the reserve and strongly reinforce and train the anti-poaching units, supported as well by the Botswana Defence Force.
Rhinos need their horns for several functions such as defending from other rhinos and from predators and for foraging behavior, such as digging for water. So dehorning must be only a solution used under conditions of severe poaching threat, as in this case.

In South Africa only, 1.052 rhinos have been killed in 2016, 1.028 last year. We are now waiting for the 2018 official numbers from South African Government. After hit 1.215 rhinos killed in 2014, a recent decline is underway, so let’s cross fingers to 3 digits…

For more infos about rhino crisis, check out Save the Rhino International www.savetherhino.org ——————————— #endangered #rhino #poaching  #wildlifetrade #wildlifecrime #everydayextinction #biodiversity#extinction #africa #botswana #conservation#wildlife #wildlifephotography #naturephotography#conservationphotography #naturephotography#conservationphotography #nikonmaster#nikoneurope @nikonproeurope @nikoneurope @limpopolipadi @savetherhinointernational


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Everyday Extinction

Photo by @robindmoore / On Valentine's Day Romeo, the world's loneliest frog, swam into our hearts when @Global_Wildlife_Conservation and @centro_kayra launched a quest to find him a mate. I am thrilled to announce that the team have, against the odds, found his Juliet in the cloud forests of Bolivia! Hop on over to @global_wildlife_conservation to follow the couple as they embark on an audacious journey to save their species - the Sehuencas Water Frog - from extinction. #Match4Romeo #conservationoptimism


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Everyday Extinction

Image by @cristinamittermeier This image of young @Takaiya_Blaney, a singer, song-writer, drummer, and speaker for her people, the Tla’amin First Nation of British Columbia, encapsulates my three greatest passions: the natural world, indigenous rights and empowerment of women. The Salish Sea, British Columbia. According to a July 2018 @NatGeo article, 'Mapping the Critical Role of Indigenous Peoples in Global Conservation', "Indigenous Peoples have many names around the world. With such diversity in names and cultures, some people might not be aware of the many things that Indigenous Peoples share. One is deep cultural attachment to their land and sea – an attachment that goes far beyond mere ownership. Another, too often, has been dispossession of that land. Indigenous Peoples are the first peoples. Over the centuries, second, third, fourth peoples have invaded and colonized their lands and dis-empowered the original inhabitants....In an increasingly urbanized world, characterized by pervasive habitat loss and degradation, the lands owned or managed by Indigenous Peoples stand out for their conservation values. Indigenous peoples’ lands include more than 40 percent of existing protected areas and 37 percent of lands with high natural values. Indeed, indigenous lands are twice as likely as other lands to have high natural values....Indigenous Peoples are therefore essential to meeting any global biodiversity targets."
#turningthetide with @sea_legacy#getfishfarmsout #reconciliationcanada #girlup #girlpower #indigenousrightsnow #EverydayExtinction #extinction #canada #salishsea #britishcolumbia #everydayeverywhere


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Everyday Extinction

#Repost @amivitale: Photo by @ggkenya. This week I’m sharing work from some of my favorite photographers covering natural history. Please join me in supporting these incredibly talented people! .
From Georgina Goodwin (@ggkenya) // “Cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) brothers at sunset in Kenya’s Masai Mara. Can you spot the second in the grass?
Cheetah are incredibly vulnerable. Half of their hunt chases, which last from 20 - 60 seconds, are unsuccessful. Cheetahs don't do well against other larger predators like the lion, leopard, and hyena, all of which compete with cheetahs for prey and will kill cheetahs given the opportunity.
In Kenya in the early 1980s, there were more than 5,000 cheetahs, now according to Kenya Wildlife Service @KWS, there are only 1,000 cheetahs left in Kenya.
Right now, Kenya’s predators are in trouble. Our lions, leopards, cheetahs, hyenas and wild dogs are facing more threats than ever before, such as loss of habitat, ecosystems under pressure and conflict with humans. Realising this, the Kenya Wildlife Trust (@KWT) set up the Mara Predator Conservation Program to determine threats in the Greater Mara Ecosystem and to develop sustainable solutions to mitigate them,
👉To follow and support their important work go to https://kenyawildlifetrust.org/category/predator-conservation” .
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#Everydayextinction #extinction #cheetah #NatGeoYourShot #EverydayEverywhere #nature #Biodiversity #bigcats #ourplanetdaily #keepitwild #catsofinstagram #canonambassador #liveforthestory #orange #earthfocus #conservation @natgeowild #kenya #igkenya #sunset


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Everyday Extinction

Image by guest contributor Daniel Wakefield @genesispythons "Emperor of the Orange Groves" - The Eastern Indigo Snake (Drymarchon couperi) is the largest snake species native to the United States, with a record length over 8 feet.  Its Latin name means "emperor of the forest," and the name is well deserved.  The Eastern Indigo is one of the top predators in its upland scrub and pineland habitats, preying on everything from rodents to venomous rattlesnakes.  Males of this species patrol huge ranges for a snake, with territories up to 1200 acres.  It is certainly an icon of the Southeast.  However, this species is facing many threats to its continued reign.  Besides human persecution and road mortality, one of the biggest dangers these snakes face is the loss of their habitat due to development and agriculture.  Large tracts of their former habitat are now dominated by subdivisions of houses or large commercial orange groves.  An adult male Eastern Indigo is pictured here at the edge of an orange grove in central Florida.  Thankfully, there are still some pockets of good habitat where these animals are hanging on.  But if we're not careful, these pockets may also eventually disappear. 
#everdayextinction #extinction #usa #america #florida #snakes


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Everyday Extinction

Photo @ggkenya. Giraffe gallop across the main road between two of the Masai Mara’s northern conservancies, Mara North and Naboisho. Outside of the conservancy’s protected wild spaces, as human and wildlife populations continue to grow, giraffe and other wildlife are forced to navigate new fence lines and increasing number of cars on the roads,
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For many years giraffe have been suffering loss of habitat, disease and illegal hunting for bushmeat, and face the risk of collisions with vehicles and power lines. Research has revealed a 40% drop in global giraffe population over the last 30 years. Giraffe species are currently undergoing what is being termed the SILENT EXTINCTION. According to recent figures there are around 8,500 individuals left living in the wild,
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There are nine subspecies of giraffes, five are declining in numbers, two are improving, and one is stable, reports the New York Times. Two subspecies of the world's tallest land animal -- the Kordofan giraffe and the Nubian giraffe - were added to the list of "critically endangered. These giraffe subspecies are found mainly across East, Central, and West Africa. Another subspecies living in the Horn of Africa -- called the reticulated giraffe - are now listed as "endangered",
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Although some of species numbers are growing all nine have suffered in the face of poaching as well as agriculture, mining and construction across Africa.
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#Everydayextinction @everydayextinction @cites #Biodiversity #extinction #giraffe #silentextinction #keepitwild #NatGeoYourShot #nature #visualsoflife #ourplanetdaily #loveanimals #canonCNA #liveforthestory #documentary #earthfocus #conservation @natgeowild #liveforthestory #openmyworld #wildlifephotography


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Everyday Extinction

Photo by @amivitale. Ye Ye, a 16-year-old giant panda, lounges in a wild enclosure at a conservation center in Wolong China Conservation & Research Center for the Giant Panda in Sichuan Province, China. Her name, whose characters represent Japan and China, celebrates the friendship between the two nations. Ye Ye’s cub Hua Yan (Pretty Girl) is being trained for release into the wild. By breeding and releasing pandas, augmenting existing populations, and protecting habitat, China is on its way to successfully saving its most famous ambassador and in the process put the wild back into an icon. --- According to @WWF, "The good news is that the survey estimates 1,864 pandas live in the wild. That’s a 16.8% increase since the last survey released in 2003. How does this compare with past figures ? The first survey (1974-77) estimated there were 2,459 giant pandas in the wild. The second (1985-88) estimated 1,114. The third survey, published in 2004, estimated there were 1,596. The latest rise in the estimate is particularly encouraging, as the 2004 increase was in large partly down to researchers using better techniques and surveying a wider area. The new figures show that the hard work of the Chinese government, local communities, nature reserve staff and WWF is paying off." #everydayextinction #extinction #biodiversity #pandas #wolong #china #amivitale @nikonusa @thephotosociety #nikonambassador


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Everyday Extinction

Image by @sean_gallagher_photo  A woman works in her fields which have been converted from mangroves into paddy fields in Guangdong Province, China. According to @WWF, "More than 35% of the world’s mangroves are already gone. The figure is as high as 50% in countries such as India, the Philippines, and Vietnam, while in the Americas they are being cleared at a rate faster than tropical rainforests." Threats include clearing for coastal commercial developments, agriculture, pollution and climate change. "Like coral reefs, mangrove forests are extremely productive ecosystems that provide numerous good and services both to the marine environment and people...these goods and services are conservatively estimated to be worth US$186 million each year. They include: fisheries, timber and plant products, coastal protection and tourism." #everydayextinction #extinction #mangroves #ecology #china #guangdong #agriculture @everydayeverywhere


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Everyday Extinction

Image by @antonsrkn - Ornithologist, Micah Scholer, examines a woodcreeper that was captured during @sustainableamazon 's biodiversity survey of a remote tract of jungle in Peru.  Data such as age, species, location of capture, body condition, and more was quickly gathered before the bird was released unharmed back into the jungle. Alliance for a Sustainable Amazon is already preparing for another biodiversity survey of the area, with some luck this individual will be captured again and follow up data will be acquired.  Repeated sampling like this allows for monitoring of the populations and helps answer deceptively simple questions like "how long do these birds live in the wild"? Additionally, long term monitoring of populations can reveal trends that would otherwise be invisible.  A study published late last year "Climate change causes upslope shifts and mountaintop extirpations in a tropical bird community" published in PNAS by Freeman, Scholer, Ruiz-Gutierrez, & Fitzpatrick re-sampled a section of remote Peruvian cloud forest using the same methods as a 1985 study.  What they found was troubling, as temperatures had increased bird species' ranges had shifted upwards.  Half of the birds that lived at the highest elevation near the top of the peak had vanished entirely. This effect where climate change drives species upwards along a slope until they finally reach the top and can go no higher and subsequently die out was aptly described as an "escalator to extinction". Distressing findings that almost certainly are applicable to more than just birds but rather to various species of wildlife living on mountain slopes.  Boots on the ground research is critical in understanding these processes and providing evidence that will hopefully lead to policy changes in the fight against climate change.  #EverydayExtinction #biodiversity #conservation #ConservationPhotography #ornithology #Peru #ClimateChange #Anthropocene #birdsofinstagram


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