Robin Hammond@hammond_robin

Photographer, Co-founder Witness Change, Human Rights Activist, Supports LGBT rights, No Health Without Mental Health, Love animals so I don't eat em!

www.onedayinmyworld.com/

208 posts 177,383 followers 1,149 following

Robin Hammond

Photo by @Hammond_Robin for @ICRC // “I hate wars,” says 50-yer-old Shams (name changed) from Mosul, Iraq. “They only bring destruction and unrest.” The mortar round that struck her house left it in rubble and flames. The wounds she suffered were not from the explosion itself but from rushing back into the burning building to save her two sons. Her daughter and husband are in the hospital with her, but her two sons were reportedly taken elsewhere - she hasn’t been able to locate them. // With the end of combat operations, Iraq is hoping to break the cycles of violence that reach back to the Iran-Iraq war of the 1980s. These conflicts have caused immense suffering for civilians: millions have fled their homes, livelihoods have been destroyed and large numbers have been killed and wounded. // This work was supported by the International Committee of the Red Cross, a humanitarian organization working on all sides of conflict to alleviate people’s suffering. To see more from the A Woman’s War project, go to @icrc


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Robin Hammond

Photograph by @Hammond_Robin for @ICRC // In north-eastern Nigeria, merely going to work can be an act of bravery. 29 year old nurse Nafisa Abdulhameed (pictured) who works in an ICRC supported hospital learnt yesterday just how risky her work is. It has been announced that her colleague, 24-year-old Hauwa Mohammed Liman, a health worker, who had been abducted in March was killed by her captors. Another health worker abducted at the same time, Saifura Hussaini Ahmed Khorsa was killed in September. A third is still held captive. The ICRC made sustained and committed efforts to secure the release of the health-care workers, including a last-minute plea for mercy on Sunday to the Islamic State West Africa Province group, to no avail. // Nafisa is familiar with the violence that has rocked the region. She works in a specialist gunshot and bomb blast wounded ward set up and run by the ICRC in the State Specialist Hospital in Maiduguri. Everyday she stitches wounds and plugs gaping wounds of men and women who’ve experienced first hand the destructive force of sharp exploding metal. // Men make war; women live with the consequences. At least that is the way it is largely perceived. While living with and reacting to those consequences, women are hardly passive victims, though. They grieve, they fight against the suffering, and many find they are forced to re-invent themselves, shedding an old identify and forging a new one shaped by war. // This work was supported by the International Committee of the Red Cross, a humanitarian organization working on all sides of conflict to alleviate people’s suffering. To see more from the A Woman’s War project, go to @icrc


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Robin Hammond

Photograph by @Hammond_Robin for @ICRC // “My hope is to be able to finish school so I can help mum and my siblings,” says 15-year-old Jaliyah from the evacuation centre that is now her home. Her smile masks the trauma from the war she has fled in her hometown of Marawi in the Philippines. Her cheerfulness hides the fear she has for the sister, not seen since they were displaced, and the father who was arrested as a suspected member of the opposition armed group. What does she want for her future? “The best thing that could happen here in the evacuation centre would be meeting new friends and meeting long lost relatives.” // For nearly five decades, the Philippine government has been engaged in armed conflicts in the southern region of Mindanao with several armed groups. The prolonged conflicts, rooted deeply in disputes over land, political and religious ideology, resulted in thousands of people being killed, with many more enduring repeated displacement and hardship. // This work was supported by the International Committee of the Red Cross, a humanitarian organization working on all sides of conflict to alleviate people’s suffering. To see more from the A Woman’s War project, go to @icrc


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Robin Hammond

Photos @Hammond_Robin. Today, on World Food Day, I thought I’d share images I took in 2013 in beautiful Ethiopia for a story on food production in Africa for @NatGeo.


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Robin Hammond

Photo by @Hammond_Robin // “I said to myself, ‘Things can’t stay like this any longer.’ So we started to get together—the mothers, the victims, the orphans. We started to fight.” 54-year-old Dionisia Calderon from Ayacucho, Peru lost two husbands in the war, was gang raped, and watched as her house was burned down. When the war ended, she represented her town’s women and faced their abusers in trials.
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Paralysed for more than a decade by a conflict between the Shining Path and the military during the 1980s and 1990s, Peru's communities have suffered immensely. Family members disappeared, homes were destroyed, and the social fabric of communities were left in tatters. Today, these communities have found a slow road back to recovery. Many families are still searching for answers about the fate of the estimated 20,000 still missing. //
This work comes from ‘A Woman’s War’ published this week on the @NatGeo website.


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Robin Hammond

Photo by @hammond_robin //
“I miss my father and really want him back,” says 10-year-old TA (not her real name). “Nothing good comes from war.” TA’s family says her father was forced to join ISIS and was killed in an air strike. After their village was retaken by the Iraqi Army, family members of ISIS fighters were brought to a displaced persons camp of Al-Shahama.
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With the end of combat operations, Iraq is hoping to break the cycles of violence that reach back to the Iran-Iraq war of the 1980s. These conflicts have caused immense suffering for civilians: millions have fled their homes, livelihoods have been destroyed and large numbers have been killed and wounded. //
This work comes from ‘A Woman’s War’ published this week on the @NatGeo website


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Robin Hammond

Photo by @Hammond_Robin for @ICRC
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“I don’t need (to) fear again,” says Rita (name changed) from Port Harcourt, Nigeria. “I am focusing on my future tomorrow.” Rita was abducted and held captive for two days on her way back from her local market. Abduction and armed violence is sadly familiar to the communities around Port Harcourt. Urban violence leads to displacement, disruption of health services and long-term psychological trauma. //
Men make war; women live with the consequences. At least that is the way it is largely perceived. While living with and reacting to those consequences, women are hardly passive victims. They grieve, they fight against the suffering, and many find they are forced to re-invent themselves, shedding an old identify and forging a new one shaped by war. //
This work was made with the support of The International Committee of the Red Cross, a humanitarian organization working on all sides of conflict to alleviate people’s suffering. To see more from the A Woman’s War project, go to @icrc


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Robin Hammond

Photo by @Hammond_Robin for @icrc .
“Iraqi people have suffered a lot,” says 16-year-old Rana Khalid. The curtain she stands in front of covers the entrance to her school in Ramadi. Behind the curtain, girls in uniform giggle and seem not to notice the shrapnel scarred hallways or the mortar blown holes in their classroom ceilings. Like many children deprived of education – Khalid lived as a refugee for two years – what they see is an institution that can offer them a better future. “I imagine that a decade from now I will work as a teacher and talk to students about past wars in Iraq,” says Rana.
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With the end of combat operations, Iraq is hoping to break the cycles of violence that reach back to the Iran-Iraq war of the 1980s. These conflicts have caused immense suffering for civilians: millions have fled their homes, livelihoods have been destroyed and large numbers have been killed and wounded. .
Men make war; women live with the consequences. At least that is the way it is largely perceived. While living with and reacting to those consequences, women are hardly passive victims, though. They grieve, they fight against the suffering, and many find they are forced to re-invent themselves, shedding an old identify and forging a new one shaped by war. .
The International Committee of the Red Cross is a humanitarian organization working on all sides of conflict to alleviate people’s suffering. To see more from the A Woman’s War project, go to @icrc


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Robin Hammond

Photo by @Hammond_Robin for @icrc .
“They said that there was another bomb so I laid low and began to crawl,” says 30-year-old Yabintu who sells food in a market in Konduga in Borno state, Nigeria. “As I crawled, I realized that my body was pierced in many places, and I continued until I hid in the nearby bush.” The suspected bomb blast that killed many people in the market left her with injuries to her legs, arm and head. I met her in a specialist gunshot and bomb blast wounded ward set up and run by the ICRC in the State Specialist Hospital in Maiduguri. Around her in the ward the stitched up and gauze plugged gaping wounds of other women graphically illustrated the destructive force of sharp exploding metal on flesh. During the interview, the heat of the crowded ward and the pain from injuries still new, brought dripping sweat to Yabintu’s forehead. She explained how the risk of bomb blasts must be daily weighed: “Many (women) have lost their husbands and they do not have a means of livelihood,” she said. “If you go out, you get killed. And if you stay at home, there is nothing for you to eat.”
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The Lake Chad region – Nigeria, Niger, Cameroon, Chad – has been ripped apart by conflict. Civilians have been targeted and killed, and over 2.4 million people have been forced to flee their homes. Millions more are in need of food, water, shelter and access to health care.
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Men make war; women live with the consequences. At least that is the way it is largely perceived. While living with and reacting to those consequences, women are hardly passive victims, though. They grieve, they fight against the suffering, and many find they are forced to re-invent themselves, shedding an old identify and forging a new one shaped by war.
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This work is from a project I made with The International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC). You can see the full story at www.nationalgeographic.com
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The ICRC is a humanitarian organization working on all sides of conflict to alleviate people’s suffering. To see more from the A Woman’s War project, go to @icrc


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Robin Hammond

Photos by @Hammond_Robin for @OneDayInMyWorld
To be honest it was with a sense of relief that I stopped working on the subject of mental health in mid 2013. The horror of the situation I was documenting and the utter hopelessness to be able make a difference left me uncertain of why I was there, uneasy about my role. Today, on #WorldMentalHealthDay, I’m reminded of that work and of what came next: After a 12 month break I returned to documenting mental health. But this time it was different. Determined to be more than a bystander I had created the not for profit organisation @WitnessChange designed to elevate mental health stories and contribute to a world where people with mental health conditions are seen, heard and valued. The work is no less sad but change is now at the centre of the storytelling. And, as a result, the needle is moving. While the need is truly great, so is my faith that change is possible. Please follow @onedayinmyworld


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Robin Hammond

Photo @Hammond_Robin for @WhereLoveIsIllegal // "I don't believe God hates gays,” says Eddy Love (not his real name), a 35 year old bisexual man from Ghana. "The great challenge is about the Christians... Because the moment you come out to accept it, they always come out to talk about it, but they say it's not allowed to be gay in Ghana.” // When I travelled to Ghana for Where Love is Illegal I was struck by how many of the people I photographed requested that their identities be hidden. Ghana’s strong Christian faith was sited as one of the reasons why coming out was not safe. //
I went to Kenya, Mozambique and Ghana with the support of Elton John AIDS Foundation (@ejaf) to continue sharing LGBTQI+ stories of survival and to raise awareness of the impacts of stigma. Around the world, grants made by the Elton John AIDS Foundation make possible the work of countless community-rooted organizations that touch the lives of millions every day. For more information, and to join the fight, visit www.ejaf.org // This is a @witness_change project. For more stories of survival or to share your own story follow @whereloveisillegal


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Robin Hammond

Photo @Hammond_Robin for @WhereLoveIsIllegal
// I told Kuteesa’s story at the United Nations this week. I wanted to leave the delegates in no doubt how violent homophobia and transphobia is. I took Kuteesa’s portrait (left) with her partner and Ernest at Kakuma refugee camp in north western Kenya. They had fled Uganda seeking a safer, better life. That’s not what they found. In the refugee camp they faced threats of violence from other refugees and locals. Kutessa explained the danger she felt walking around the camp: “you can be stoned to death. Even if you are sick, you have to just suffer in case you fail to get someone to escort you to the hospitals… Everywhere you go, people ridicule you, and we are so misery now.” A few weeks later we received the picture on slide two - of Kuteesa unconscious after being beaten in the camp. “I would like for us to have enough freedom to live freely without having to hide our feelings in public just like it is in some foreign countries” Kuteesa told me.
// Where Love is Illegal traveled to Kenya, Mozambique and Ghana with the support of Elton John AIDS Foundation (@ejaf) to continue our work sharing LGBTQI+ stories of survival and to raise awareness of the impacts of stigma. Around the world, grants made by the Elton John AIDS Foundation make possible the work of countless community-rooted organizations that touch the lives of millions every day. For more information, and to join the fight, visit www.ejaf.org // This is a @witness_change project. For more stories of survival or to share your own story follow @whereloveisillegal


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