The Met@metmuseum

The Met presents over 5,000 years of art from every corner of the world.

https://met.org/2HPBUlz

The @metcostumeinstitute's spring 2018 exhibition, “Heavenly Bodies: Fashion and the Catholic Imagination”—at The Met Fifth Avenue and The Met Cloisters—features a dialogue between fashion and medieval art from The Met collection to examine fashion's ongoing engagement with the traditions of Catholicism. In the Museum’s Medieval Sculpture hall, objects on display are organized “to separate the earthly hierarchy from the celestial hierarchy.” Learn more about this exhibition in this video narrated by exhibition curator Andrew Bolton, Wendy Yu Curator in Charge, The Costume Institute. #TheMet #MetCloisters #MetHeavenlyBodies


60

Closing next Sunday, “Painted in Mexico, 1700–1790: Pinxit Mexici” highlights the unmatched vitality and inventiveness of artists in eighteenth-century New Spain (Mexico). The first major exhibition devoted to this neglected topic, “Painted in Mexico” surveys the most important artists and stylistic developments of the period and highlights the emergence of new pictorial genres and subjects. Nicolás Enríquez (Mexican, 1704–1790). The Marriage of the Virgin (Los Desposorios de la Virgen), Los Angeles County Museum of Art, adquirido con fondos de Kelvin Davis, Lynda y Stewart Resnick, Kathy y Frank Baxter, Beth y Josh Friedman, y Jane y Terry Semel a través del 2012 Collectors Committee (M.2012.38.1) 1745 #TheMet


59

It’s Friday the 13th, sometimes considered to be an unlucky day. In this image, Steen and members of his family modeled for this scene of domestic chaos, which is still called a "Jan Steen Household" in The Netherlands. The company acts out a variety of familiar sins, such as Sloth, Gluttony, Lust (papa and the maid), and other offences—a Bible is trampled, and a beggar is repelled at the door—all heedless of the open watch, suggesting temperance, and the basket hanging like Fate over their heads (the objects in it promise poverty, disease, bad luck, and justice). Jan Steen (Dutch, 1626–1679). The Dissolute Household, ca. 1663–64 #TheMet #JanSteen


70

Born on this day in 1884, the Italian Amedeo Modigliani arrived in Paris in 1906 and initially worked alongside the Romanian sculptor Constantin Brancusi, who had been in the city since 1904. Between 1909 and 1915, Modigliani made a series of sculptures, such as “Woman’s Head,” with elongated features, oval heads, and thinly incised eyes that show the definitive influence of Brancusi as well as of African sculpture. Amedeo Modigliani (Italian, 1884–1920). Woman's Head, 1912 #TheMet #AmedeoModigliani #Modigliani


124

On this day in 1804, Aaron Burr and Alexander #Hamilton engaged in a deadly duel. Subsequently, there was a great demand for portraits of Hamilton and John Trumbull produced several replicas, including this example, of a portrait he had made from life. Nearly a century later, the painting became the first early American work to enter The Met's collection. John Trumbull (American, 1756–1843). Alexander Hamilton, 1804–6. #TheMet #JohnTrumbull #AmericaWing #AlexanderHamilton


173

The @metcostumeinstitute's spring 2018 exhibition, “Heavenly Bodies: Fashion and the Catholic Imagination”—at The Met Fifth Avenue and The Met Cloisters—features a dialogue between fashion and medieval art from The Met collection to examine fashion's ongoing engagement with Catholicism. Explore galleries at @TheMetCloisters in this video narrated by exhibition curator Andrew Bolton, Wendy Yu Curator in Charge, The Costume Institute. #TheMet #MetCloisters #MetHeavenlyBodies


72

Happy birthday to Camille Pissarro, born on this day in 1830. This canvas of summer 1895 shows a corner of Pissarro's garden at Éragny, a small village in northern France where he lived from 1884 until his death. Camille #Pissarro (French, 1830–1903). Poplars, Éragny, 1895. #TheMet #CamillePissarro


122

“It is my duty to voice the sufferings of humankind, the never-ending sufferings heaped mountain high.” —Käthe Kollwitz, who was born on this day in 1867 in Königsberg (now Kaliningrad), Prussia. Kollwitz, a life long pacifist, is best known for her woodcuts and sculptures portraying social and political critique. Käthe Kollwitz (German, 1867–1945). Self-Portrait with Hand on the Forehead (Selbstbildnis mit der Hand an der Stirn), 1910 #TheMet #KätheKollwitz #KatheKollwitz @metdrawingsandprints


137

Featuring masterworks by Bonnard, Cassatt, Cézanne, Corot, Daumier, Van Gogh, Manet, Matisse, Monet, Seurat, and more, “Public Parks, Private Gardens: Paris to Provence” provides insight into how parks and gardens became the distinctive scenery of contemporary life during the nineteenth century, an extraordinarily creative period in France's history. Georges Seurat (French, 1859–1891). Study for "A Sunday on La Grande Jatte,"1884 #TheMet #GeorgesSeurat #ParksandGardens


200

Marc Chagall was born on this day in 1887. Chagall painted this picture in 1911, one year after he first saw the Eiffel Tower during his travels to Paris from Russia, his native country. The dynamic composition centers at the famous Parisian monument. Marc Chagall (French, 1887–1985). Le Pont de Passy et la Tour Eiffel, 1911. #TheMet #MarcChagall #EiffelTower


61

“African American Portraits: Photographs from the 1940s and 1950s” presents more than one hundred and fifty studio portraits of African Americans from the mid-twentieth century, part of an important recent acquisition by The Met. Produced by mostly unidentified makers, the photographs are a poignant, collective self portrait of the African American experience during the 1940s and 1950s—a time of war, middle-class growth, and seismic cultural change. Does anyone in these photos look familiar? Check out the last slide to see how you can help us identify some of this sitters in this exhibition. #TheMet


48

"Visitors to Versailles (1682–1789)” highlights the experiences of travelers from 1682, when Louis XIV moved his court to Versailles, to 1789, when the royal family was forced to leave the palace and return to Paris. Through paintings, portraits, furniture, tapestries, carpets, costumes, porcelain, sculpture, arms and armor, and guidebooks, the exhibition illustrates what visitors encountered at court, what kind of welcome and access to the palace they received, and, most importantly, what impressions, gifts, and souvenirs they took home with them. #VisitorstoVersailles #TheMet


468