Museum of Fine Arts, Boston@mfaboston

Founded in 1870, #mfaBoston encompasses an encyclopedic collection, representing all cultures & time periods. Home of #RileyTheMuseumDog.

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Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

#TriviaTuesday: Song Dynasty ceramics, such as this covered jar with dragon and tiger (13th century), are beloved for their pale green hues, similar to the color of jade. Which chemical compound is released during the kiln firing process to create this cherished green color?


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Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

What's new in the galleries? This pair of "Possible Bags" (Probably Lakota [Sioux], late 19th century)—recently acquired from the Estate of David Rockefeller!
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Traders coined the term “possible bag” in the early 19th century, literally translating “a bag for every possible thing.” Traditionally made by and for nomadic Native Americans of the Plains, possible bags could be tied to saddles or used as pillows around the inside of a tipi. American painter Joseph Henry Sharp probably acquired this pair while working on the Crow Agency in Montana around 1905. The bags were later bought by John D. Rockefeller Jr. on his travels to the American West.


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Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

Do you have a work of art from our collection that you'd like to learn more about? @markrichards7892 recently requested a piece by #ArthurDove, and this post is for them 👋 Comment with your requests, and we'll plan on featuring your choice in a future post! 💌
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In his images of nature, Dove sought out underlying formal and color relationships and his compositions often bordered on the completely abstract. In "Rising Moon" (1941, on view in "Making Modern"), he creates the sensation of the moon's pearly light by deftly applying small strokes of pale yellow, reds and blues—a technique that betrays his admiration for French Post-Impressionist painters.


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Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

With lush, deep colors and a whimsical playfulness, #JackBush endeavored to capture what he called the “essence” and “feeling” of what he was experiencing or observing—such as a beautiful flower or a piece of music. "Jack Bush: Radiant Abstraction," now on view, features three large-scale canvases—two of them recent gifts to the Museum—that span 10 years of Bush’s career, from 1964 to 1974, and display the range of his later style.
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🎨: "Striped Column" (1964).


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Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

In the early 20th century, Boston boasted one of the most active and influential jewelry-making and metalworking communities in the nation. "Boston Made: Arts and Crafts Jewelry and Metalwork," now on view, presents more than 70 objects by 14 artist-craftspeople whose work defined the Boston style.
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💎: Necklace by #FrankGardnerHale.


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Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

Henri #Matisse represented the female nude many times, both in painting and in sculpture. In this striking early work, the rounded forms of Carmelina’s body, strongly modeled in light and dark, stand out almost in relief against the pattern of rectangular shapes behind her. The subject of the nude, usually relaxed and seductive, here becomes a confrontation between the boldly posed model and the artist—visible in the mirror at the back of the studio. See "Carmelina" (1903) in "In the Studio," a new collection installation featuring works by members of the European avant-garde from the early 20th-century.


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Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

The stories of #WinnieThePooh—a much-loved bear with a weakness for honey—have delighted both children and adults for more than 90 years. You're invited to explore the wondrous world of the Hundred Acre Wood through original sketches, photographs, memorabilia, manuscripts and letters in our exhibition "Winnie-the-Pooh: Exploring a Classic."
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📖: "Winnie-the-Pooh first edition" (1924) © Image courtesy of @vamuseum


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Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

This week's fan favorite goes to @mckennahiller! Thanks for checking out #SheilaHicks' "Bamian" (1968) in the Linde Family Wing for #ContemporaryArt. Enter next week using #mfaBoston!


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Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

"It's my private mountain. It belongs to me. God told me if I painted it enough, I could have it." Born #onthisday in 1887, #GeorgiaOKeeffe felt a spiritual connection to the distinctive, flat-topped mountain, called the Pedernal, that she saw every day from her New Mexico patio. In “Deer’s Skull with Pedernal” (1936) she evokes a surreal dream landscape by painting a blue sky through the eyeholes.


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Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

Fun fact: more than half a mile of unspun wool was used to create @ceciliavicuna’s newly commissioned installation “Quipu desaparecido” (2018). The artist collaborated closely with our #mfaConservation staff to divide 16 bales of the fragile material—each 60 feet long and 8 feet wide—into narrower lengths, which were then worked into knotted strands. The final installation, now on view in our Linde Family Wing for #ContemporaryArt, references ancient quipus—complex record-keeping devices used by the Inka, which contain a wealth of information that scholars today are still attempting to decipher. For Vicuña, each strand in her work—a “quipu for the future,” as she calls it—is unique and holds the capacity to communicate.


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Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

This photo is pure poetry! We love @thisisemtography's recreation of "Dante and Virgil" (modeled 1861; cast 1862) by Baron Henri de Triqueti.


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Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

Happy birthday to beloved French #Impressionist, Claude #Monet! The MFA's gallery dedicated to the artist (born #onthisday in 1840) provides an immersive look at his enduring fascination with watery surfaces, his life-long appreciation for Japanese art and culture, and his frequent return to favorite locations and motifs.


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