MOCA@mocalosangeles

The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles

https://lat.ms/2KUkea7

A.L. Steiner: “[Nan Goldin] is obsessed with light and color. Like William Eggleston’s dye transfer prints, there’s the rich tapestry of being able to paint, but not painting, and being able to capture something that feels akin the pleasure of playing inside of color and light.” [Installation view of Real Worlds: Brassaï, Arbus, Goldin, March 4–September 3, 2018 at MOCA Grand Avenue, courtesy of The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, photo by Brian Forrest]


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Hannah Greely: “All of my pieces are really the middle - there’s no telling you what happened before, there’s no telling you what happens after, you kinda just make that up yourself… sculpture in general can be seen as the middle of a story.” #fromthearchive [Hannah Greely, Remainder, 2001-2006, Painted bronze and possible live birds attracted by birdseed, 74 1/2 x 62 3/4 x 18 in. (189.23 x 159.39 x 45.72 cm)]


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Christopher Knight: “Lauren Halsey’s 'we still here, there,' on view downtown through the summer at the Museum of Contemporary Art, locates the shifting shadows and perceptual conundrums of Plato’s cave in the backyard and garage of her grandmother’s house in South Los Angeles, where the artist built the show’s big grotto. Tepid the installation is not. Absorbing it is.” Read Christopher Knight’s review of @summaeverythang’s exhibition we still here, there in the @LAtimes! Halsey’s work will also be featured at the @Hammer_Museum as a part of Made in L.A. 2018. (Link in bio) [Installation view of Lauren Halsey: we still here, there, March 4–September 3, 2018 at MOCA Grand Avenue, courtesy of The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, photo by Zak Kelley]


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Catherine Opie: “This is what artists do: they challenge and create discourse that create history in relationship to their ideas about their work.” #fromthearchive [Catherine Opie, Idexa 2, 1993, Chromogenic print, Frame (Wood): 21 3/8 x 17 x 2 in. (54.29 x 43.18 x 5.08 cm)]


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Barbara Bloom: “When I think about my favorite writers, particularly Nabokov, I realize that everything can be said about a person without directly pointing to those facts. That’s how he writes. You feel that you know everything about this person without him spelling it all out for you.” Barbara Bloom’s mixed media installation The Reign of Narcissism is currently on view at MOCA Pacific Design Center as a part of Décor: Barbara Bloom, Andrea Fraser, Louise Lawler! [Installation view of Décor: Barbara Bloom, Andrea Fraser, Louise Lawler, April 28–July 15, 2018 at MOCA Pacific Design Center, courtesy of The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, photo by Zak Kelley]


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Mike Kelley: “Monstrosity is fascinating and attractive-although I don’t think of my work as being specifically concerned with the monstrous. I think my work is more about structural interplay-I entertain many kinds of subjects in it.” #fromthearchive [Mike Kelley, Manly Craft #3, 1989, Yarn animals, 25 x 10 x 5 in. (63.5 x 25.4 x 12.7 cm)]


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Lauren Halsey (@summaeverythang): “Moving through oppressive architecture and space—I think it’s very powerful—the idea of building one’s space and living in it, embodying and moving through it and building it for one’s community and generating community as opposed to relying on the oppressive space-making that is forced on us, like schools that look like prisons or jails. ” Lauren Halsey: we still here, there, is currently on view at MOCA Grand! [Installation view of Lauren Halsey: we still here, there, March 4–September 3, 2018 at MOCA Grand Avenue, courtesy of The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, photo by Zak Kelley]


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Bendix Harms: “I love artists’ late works—when they display a completely free style because it no longer matters whether their work will earn them applause or a rap over the knuckles. They’re beyond all concepts. And I love artists who anticipate their late work.” #fromthearchive [Bendix Harms, Der Fütterer, 2004, Oil on canvas, 77 x 83 x 1 in. (195.58 x 210.82 x 2.54 cm)]


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Claes Oldenburg: “I don’t do abstract art because I don’t find it as interesting as I do subjects and depictions.” #fromthearchive [Claes Oldenburg, Hamburger with Pickle and Olive, 1962, Muslin soaked in plaster over wire frame, painted with enamel, 7 x 9 x 9 in. (17.8 x 22.9 x 22.9 cm)]


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Lynda Benglis: “I called them ‘frozen gestures’ when I was pouring with polyurethane. Prior to that I poured with latex rubber, but the gesture got lost in the flow because I was sometimes thinning it down with water. Rubber has a memory; it bounces back like a rubber band. When I threw the rubber, I felt like it was alive.” Benglis’ Night Sherbert is currently on view at MOCA Grand! [Lynda Benglis, Night Sherbet, 1969, Poured polyurethane foam, 9 x 97 x 62 in. (22.86 x 246.38 x 157.48 cm)]


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Felix Gonzalez-Torres: “Someone’s agenda [has] been enacted to define ‘public’ and ‘private’. We’re really talking about private property because there is no private space anymore. Our intimate desires, fantasies, and dreams are ruled and interpreted by the public sphere.” #fromthearchive [Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Untitled (A Corner of Baci), 1990, Endless supply of Baci chocolates individually wrapped in silver foil, overall dimensions vary with installation, ideal weight: 42 lb, Dimensions variable]


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Mike Kelley (1995): “Fahlström undermines the notion that a popular lexicon implies a homogeneous audience. He presents a dizzying and conflicted array of factual material in the conventionalized language of cartoons, but uses this language in an unnatural way.” #fromthearchive [Öyvind Fahlström, 108 Dollar Bill, 1973, One color silkscreen, 12 x 9 in. (30.5 x 22.9 cm) Frame (Black/Wood): 14 5/8 x 11 5/8 x 1 1/2 in. (37.15 x 29.53 x 3.81 cm)]


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