MOCA@mocalosangeles

The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles

http://youtu.be/DMXgANcaD9Y

Richard Misrach: “The very act of representation has been so thoroughly challenged in recent years by postmodern theories that it is impossible not to see the flaws everywhere, in any practice of photography. Traditional genres in particular—journalism, documentary studies, and fine-art photography—have become shells, or forms emptied of meaning.” #fromthearchive [Richard Misrach, Santa/Driver, 1992, ,Fuji dye-coupler print 29 3/4 x 39 in. (75.6 x 99.1 cm)]


2

Tom Learner is the head of the Science Department at the Getty Conservation Institute. In this video, Learner explains the process of conserving Jackson Pollock’s abstract expressionist painting Number 1, 1949 (1949) which is currently undergoing a significant conservation treatment publicly in MOCA’s Grand Avenue galleries as part of the exhibition Jackson Pollock’s Number 1, 1949: A Conservation Treatment. To view the full version of this video, check out MOCA’s IGTV channel or click the link in our bio!


17

Leilah Weinraub (@leilahworld): “I was super protective about [Shakedown]... this film was sacred to me. I wanted to make sure that it was released at the right time, in the right way.” This Sunday, July 22 at 3pm MOCA is pleased to present a screening of Leilah Weinraub’s Shakedown at MOCA Grand, as part of the film’s world tour! [Still from Leilah Weinraub’s SHAKEDOWN, 2018]
.
Leilah Weinraub is a New York City–based filmmaker and CEO of the fashion brand Hood By Air. Mixing the styles of Hollywood film and the less commercial strategies of 35mm film, Shakedown is a loving portrait of an empowered queer community. Named after a long-running weekly party, Weinraub’s feature-length film chronicles the history of this now-defunct Black lesbian nightclub in Mid-City Los Angeles and the essential characters who contributed to its culture. Weinraub crafted this film, which is both a documentary and a labor of love, over a fifteen year period that began in 2002. The screening will be followed by a Q&A with Leilah Weinraub and members of the cast: Egypt (@egyptsecret), Jazmyne (@josie2k4), Ronnie-Ron (@sharonrussharris) and Mahogany.


9

@69us: “I like to think [my garments] are non-demographic; that's what I call it now. It's why I don't consider myself a ‘fashion designer’ at all. It's because I just design clothes, you know? I'm not trying to reinvent the wheel, either. I'm just trying to make comfortable shit for everyone.” 69: Déjà Vu, the first solo exhibition featuring the work of anonymously-headed lifestyle brand 69, opens at MOCA PDC August 4th! [69, FW15, photo by Indah Datau]


9

Leilah Weinraub (@leilahworld): “There is no such thing as objective documentary, it just doesn’t exist. It is a completely subjective process.” This Sunday, July 22 at 3pm MOCA is pleased to present a screening of Leilah Weinraub’s documentary Shakedown at MOCA Grand, as part of the film’s world tour!
.
Leilah Weinraub is a New York City–based filmmaker and CEO of the fashion brand Hood By Air. Mixing the styles of Hollywood film and the less commercial strategies of 35mm film, Shakedown is a loving portrait of an empowered queer community. Named after a long-running weekly party, Weinraub’s feature-length film chronicles the history of this now-defunct Black lesbian nightclub in Mid-City Los Angeles and the essential characters who contributed to its culture. Weinraub crafted this film, which is both a documentary and a labor of love, over a fifteen year period that began in 2002. The screening will be followed by a Q&A with Leilah Weinraub and members of the cast: Egypt (@egyptsecret), Jazmyne (@josie2k4), Ronnie-Ron (@sharonrussharris) and Mahogany.


18

#fromthearchive [Naomi Savage, Dialogue at Versailles, 1972, Black and white photograph, Image: 10 x 11 in. (25.4 x 27.94 cm)]


9

James Rosenquist: “To be creative is to be accepting, but it’s also to be harsh on one’s self. You just don’t paint colors for the silliness of it all.” #fromthearchive [James Rosenquist, Waves, 1962, Oil on canvas, Frame (Thin Wood): 56 5/8 x 78 1/2 x 1 3/4 in. (143.83 x 199.39 x 4.45 cm) Image: 56 1/8 x 78 in. (142.56 x 198.12 cm)]


17

Décor: Barbara Bloom, Andrea Fraser, Louise Lawler at MOCA PDC closes tomorrow, July 15! [Installation view of Décor: Barbara Bloom, Andrea Fraser, Louise Lawler, April 28–July 15, 2018 at MOCA Pacific Design Center, courtesy of The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, photo by Zak Kelley]


10

Nancy Dwyer: “[In the 1970s] I had the kind of fervor about ideas, about what was the ‘correct’ artwork to be making that one might have about religion. At the time I was just against expressionism. Expression was just bad. Morally wrong… that [thought] seems kind of adorable to me now.” #fromthearchive [Nancy Dwyer, Coming Up Next.., 1986, Acrylic on canvas, 60 x 74 1/2 x 3 in. (152.4 x 189.23 x 7.62 cm)]


4

Sunday, July 15 is the last day Décor: Barbara Bloom, Andrea Fraser, Louise Lawler will be on view at MOCA PDC–on the occasion of its closing, New York-based artist Barbara Bloom will join Curatorial Associate Rebecca Matalon to discuss her work at the West Hollywood City Council Chambers at 3pm. [Installation view of Décor: Barbara Bloom, Andrea Fraser, Louise Lawler, April 28–July 15, 2018 at MOCA Pacific Design Center, courtesy of The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, photo by Zak Kelley]


6

Two of our beloved MOCA staff Dee (@sweetdeecrane) and Nathalie (@nathaliesanchezart) twinning at Real Worlds ♥️♥️ Real Worlds: Brassaï, Arbus, Goldin is currently on view at MOCA Grand! [photo by @tommytakezawa]


45

Thursday, July 12 at 7pm: MOCA and @LAFilmForum present 1968: Actions and Reactions at MOCA Grand! [Madeleine Anderson, I Am Somebody, 1969, 16mm film, color, sound, courtesy Icarus Films]
.
Madeleine Anderson: “The kinship I felt toward the women of I Am Somebody compelled me to translate the essence of their experience to film as genuinely as I could. I identified with them as a Black woman as a Black working woman, as a wife and mother of children. Their grit and determination to succeed were evocative of my own efforts to become a member of the film editors’ union. Our obstacles were the same, those of gender, racial discrimination, and politics. In the criticisms and analyses of the film by some white feminists during the 70s, I Am Somebody was not regarded as a feminist film. To me, the importance of the film was not its classification, however; it is a film made by a Black woman for and about Black women. At the time my concern was had I been successful in making a film that was true to their experience?”
.
Over the course of 2018, Filmforum will present a variety of films reflecting the turbulent global events of 1968—from the assassinations of MLK Jr. and Robert Kennedy to the 1968 U.S. presidential election and the May strikes in France. The films in 1968: Actions and Reactions showcase an era that is cycling back into our national consciousness. The program includes several short films that follow the draft resisters in Boston and the disruption of the 1968 Miss America Pageant; Tom Palazzolo’s CAMPAIGN, an impressionistic view of the clashes during the 1968 Democratic National Convention; and Madeleine Anderson’s moving I AM SOMEBODY, a film documenting a strike by black female hospital workers in Charleston, South Carolina.


10