Museum of the City of New York@museumofcityny

Connecting the past, present, and future of New York City. Open daily from 10-6. #BeyondSuffrage #ArtintheOpen #KubrickPhotos #Candela #RebelWomenNY

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These aren't just a pair of cute ladies' boots—these are rebellious shoes. On view in our "Rebel Women: Defying Victorianism" exhibition, these 19th-century women's satin boots would have been a symbol of a woman's nonconformity; only a rebellious woman wore scarlet shoes—or any form of "fancy dress"—on the street during the day. Covered clothing and muted colors were the hallmark of a "true" Victorian lady, who was supposed to deflect, rather than attract, attention to her physical appearance. See these shoes and learn the stories of women who defied the conventions of Victorian womanhood in #RebelWomenNY.
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Women's satin boots, 1870s-80s. Museum of the City of New York, Gift of Miss Carol Frankenthal, 54.389AB. #victorianism #victorianfashion #newyorkfashion #womensboots


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How well do you know the nooks, crannies, and history of Central Park? Test your knowledge on 7/29 when we host a scavenger hunt and happy hour with @UrbanArchiveNY in @CentralParkNYC! [link in bio]
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📸: Samuel H. Gottscho. [Central Park Lake to Central Park West], c. 1930. Museum of the City of New York, 88.1.5.59. #CentralPark #SamuelGottscho #oldnewyork #blackandwhitenewyork #vintagephotos #centralparklake


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On this day in 1984, Queens Congresswoman Geraldine Ferraro became the first woman to win a major political party's vice presidential nomination as Democrat Walter Mondale's running mate. Reminiscent of the white worn by suffragists earlier in the century, Ferraro wore a white suit dress to the 1984 Democratic National Convention where she accepted her nomination. Attendees that day recall the DNC floor to have been "virtually all women, and women who had fought so hard for women's rights." See Ferraro's outfit and more in #BeyondSuffrage, on view through August 5.
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Geraldine Ferraro campaign pin, 1984. Museum of the City of New York, gift of Amy Sack, 96.24. #GeraldineFerraro #womeninpolitics #womenshistory #nychistory #politicalhistory #womeninhistory #whitesuit #campaignbuttons


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778 Park Avenue (on the right) was the final and most exuberant apartment building by architect Rosario Candela built along Park Avenue. Candela completed ten buildings along the avenue between 1923 and 1931, indelibly contributing to its exalted status as an ultimate NYC luxury, or "a synonym for wealth" as described by the New York Herald Tribune. Candela's incredible impact on shaping the architectural legacy of 20th-century New York is now on display in "Elegance in the Sky: The Architecture of Rosario Candela." #Candela
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770 and 778 Park Avenue, 2018. Photo by Rob Stephenson, courtesy of the photographer. #nycarchitecture #architecture #prewar #parkavenue #rosariocandela #candelaapartment #neogeorgian #artdeco


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Berenice Abbott, photographer of the rapidly changing NYC of the 1930s, was born on this day in 1898. Originally from Ohio, Abbott moved to New York City's vibrant artist community in Greenwich Village after college, and then a few years later she relocated to Paris where she met Man Ray and developed her interest in photography. She came back to New York for a temporary visit after the death of her friend and fellow photographer Eugene Atget, but when she saw how much the city that she loved had changed in her absence, she decided to stay and document this evolution. With the Federal Art Project, the Museum sponsored Abbott's work, which eventually became known as "Changing New York" and was mounted as an exhibition at the Museum in 1937. Today, some 700 of Abbott's negatives reside in the Museum's collection, in addition to a significant number of prints. You can view the entire collection of the Museum's Berenice Abbott photography at collections.mcny.org.
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Berenice Abbot, Federal Art Project. Trinity Churchyard, 1935-1938. Museum of the City of New York, 43.131.1.676. #otd #onthisday #bereniceabbott #oldnewyork #changingnewyork #blackandwhitephotographs


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Considered to be one of the first gender variant/transgender people in New York history, Mary Jones was a rebel woman in every sense of the word. Born in 1803 as Peter Sewally, Jones' unabashed wearing of feminine attire and work at one of the city's brothels challenged Victorian society's rigid moral, gender, and racial binaries. This print published in New York came out a week after her trial for grand larceny, depicting Jones in a genteel white dress and refined accoutrements. However, the title of “Man-Monster” stands sharply at odds with the pictured femininity, mocking her fearless refusal to comply with society's strict expectations around which middle-class propriety revolved.
Learn more about her story and more in #RebelWomenNY, opening July 17.
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Published by Henry R. Robinson. The Man-Monster, 1836. Museum of the City of New York, 95.54.11. #womenshistory #feministhistory #transhistory #maryjones #nychistory #feminism


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Who is catching some sunshine, sand, and waves this weekend in NYC? ☀️ 🏖️🌊
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Ewing Galloway. [Coney Island.], ca. 1940. Museum of the City of New York, X2010.11.7557. #ConeyIsland #boardwalk #parachutedrop #beachseason #oldnewyork


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"Good women are rarely clever, and clever women are rarely good." Those were rebellious words for the 19th century, and they were the words of one notoriously rebellious woman: Adah Isaacs Menken. Menken was so many things in her lifetime, including a challenger of gender norms, an advocate for women's rights, the once highest-paid actress in the world, and a poet. She became internationally known for her starring role in Mazeppa, in which she performed on stage in a flesh-colored bodysuit that made her appear naked (👆). Discover more of Menken's inspiring story in "Rebel Women: Defying Victorianism" opening Tuesday, July 17. #RebelWomenNY
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Sarony & Co. Adah Isaacs Menken in Mazeppa, 1863. Museum of the City of New York, 41.132.161. #adahisaacsmenken #feminist #feminism #womenshistory #newyorkhistory


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Summer fashion is in full swing in NYC, so we chose this statement-making Pucci jumpsuit for #FashionFriday. Swipe 👉 to see the the jumpsuit as worn by vivacious socialite Laura Johnson ca. 1967. Johnson, who donated many of her pieces to the Museum, had an outsized personality that perfectly matched her flamboyant sense of style. In her @nytimes obituary in 2002, photographer Bill Cunningham described Johnson as "a caricature but a lovable one. Her life was a banquet, and she wanted her friends to share it."
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Emilio Pucci, Saks & Company. Evening jumpsuit of "Panung" silk knit jersey in light blue, turquoise, fuschia, white, and shades of purple, 1963-1967. Museum of the City of New York, 95.148.3.ALT3. #Pucci #EmilioPucci #jumpsuit #fashionhistory


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Unsupervised kids playing in the streets is something you don't see very often in New York City these days. But in the late 1970s, photographer Martha Cooper documented children playing amidst the rubble and disintegrating neighborhoods of the city as they creatively turned abandoned buildings and vacant lots into playgrounds. The Museum recently acquired a selection of twenty photographs from Cooper's street play series, and you can see more of them in today's story.
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Martha Cooper. West Side Highway [Boys with go cart with Lower Manhattan skyline.] 1978. Museum of the City of New York, 2017.47.17. @marthacoopergram #marthacooper #streetplay #playinthestreets #1970s #1970snyc


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Doesn't look comfortable, does it? 😧 In the 1860s, a new fashion trend known as the bustle - a gathering of pinned fabric at the back of a woman's dress - came into vogue. With all of that heavy fabric weighing women down, they had to lean forward to stay balanced, and this stance became known as "the Grecian Bend." Popular illustrator Thomas Worth satirized the absurdity of this fashion in this cartoon from 1868, ridiculing both the style and the women who wore it. Learn more about Victorian-era womanhood and NYC's independent, unconventional, and path-breaking women in "Rebel Women: Defying Victorianism," opening July 17th. #RebelWomenNY
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Thomas Worth. "'The Grecian Bend' Fifth Avenue Style.," 1868. Museum of the City of New York, Gift of Mrs. Harry T. (Natalie) Peters, 56.300.1282. #victorianism #womensfashion #fashionhistory #bustle


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Pioneering Broadway songwriter, Noble Sissle (seated on the left), was born on this day in 1889. He is pictured here in 1921 with his songwriting partner, Eubie Blake, the same year that their smash-hit musical, Shuffle Along, opened on Broadway. 🎭 Often called the first Broadway musical written by and for African Americans, Shuffle Along was both a commercial success and a groundbreaking show for its time. 👏🏾 Most notably, the show marked one of the first times that romantic love between two African Americans was treated seriously on a Broadway stage. 💕 Sissle and Blake wrote songs together for some 60 years, with their tunes appearing in 12 Broadway productions, including 2016's retelling of Shuffle Along featuring Audra McDonald and Billy Porter. Swipe 👉 to see these two besties approximately 40 years after their proud 1921 portrait. #thisdayinplay
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[Eubie Blake and Noble Sissle.], 1921-2000. Museum of the City of New York / Photo by White Studio ©️The New York Public Library. F2013.41.7085; Peter Scolamiero. [Eubie Blake and Noble Sissle.], ca. 1965. Museum of the City of New York, F2013.41.7072. #onthisday #otd #theaterhistory #broadway #shufflealong #noblesissle


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