New-York Historical Society@nyhistory

Founded in 1804, we are NYC's oldest museum. Join us—#becausehistorymatters.

harrypotter.nyhistory.org/

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New-York Historical Society

Guys! Guess what! Today is our birthday!! 🎉🎉 On November 20, 1804, the New-York Historical Society was founded as New York City's first museum. 👆This gorgeous building on 2nd Avenue was our home (our 7th home actually!) before we laid the cornerstone on our current spot at 77th Street and Central Park West on November 17, 1903. 🙏 This year our birthday is so close to Thanksgiving that we can't help but feel thankful for you. Your fascination with history and your support of the organization not only fuels our exhibitions, programs, and educational initiatives, but also helps us continue to dive into the American experience and share the stories of past with you—#becausehistorymatters. Thanks for helping us stick around for 214 years!


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New-York Historical Society

#TiffanyTuesday: The Thanksgiving Edition 🍂🧡🍁❤️✨ #brownglassbeauties


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New-York Historical Society

In 1880, a young girl named Mary Jane left the South and migrated to Kansas with her mother, Amanda. They were just two among thousands of African Americans, known as Exodusters, who migrated to Kansas after the Civil War, drawn to the state for its anti-slavery history. Mary Jane later got married and moved to Nicodemus, Kansas, where she and her husband eventually owned a 720-acre farm. Somewhere along the way, either Mary Jane or Amanda made this quilt top and passed it down through their family, which today survives as a legacy of their journey and of this crucial time in American history. 👉 See it on view in our exhibition "Black Citizenship in the Age of Jim Crow." #BlackCitizenship
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📸 Quilt top, 1875–1900 From the Collections of the @kansas_history.


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New-York Historical Society

Goodnight, Muggles, from the Woolworth Building. ✨

Psst! Cass Gilbert's original drawing for the Woolworth Building is now on view in "Harry Potter: A History of Magic." #HarryPotterNYHS #MACUSA
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📸 Robert L. Bracklow. Night view of the Woolworth Building, New York City, 1915. New-York Historical Society.


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New-York Historical Society

⚡️⚡️⚡️Headed to see @fantasticbeastsmovie this weekend? School your friends with this rad piece of history: #NicolasFlamel was a real guy! And this is his real 15th-century tombstone.
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Flamel made his fortune as a landlord in medieval Paris. Following his death in 1418, rumors began to circulate that he was an alchemist who had discovered the #PhilosophersStone. Flamel was buried in the church of Saint-Jacques-de-la-Boucherie in Paris, his grave marked by this tombstone, which was reputedly found being used as a cutting board in a Parisian grocery! 👆See this tombstone in "Harry Potter: A History of Magic," on view through January 27. #HarryPotterNYHS
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📸 Tombstone of Nicolas Flamel. Paris, 15th century. Paris, Musée de Cluny - Musée national du Moyen Âge.


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New-York Historical Society

On November 15, 1926, @NBC—the oldest major broadcasting company in the US—debuted its radio network with a special program of musical and comedy acts broadcast from the Waldorf Astoria Hotel for more than four hours. 🎙🎙🎙Lasting from 8 pm to 12:25 am, the program was heard on more than 25 stations, reaching about half of the United States' five million households with radios. With such a huge demand for radio programming, just a couple of months later NBC created two networks—the Red Network, which broadcast commercially sponsored entertainment programs, and the Blue Network, which broadcast un-sponsored programs about news and cultural events. Though it was dubbed the National Broadcasting Company, the network didn't actually reach the West Coast until 1927, when NBC launched the Orange Network, followed eventually by the Gold and White Networks. #Funfact: The Blue Network still sort of exists today—you just know it now as ABC.
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Irving Browning, "NBC microphone," undated. Browning Photograph Collection, 1918-1952 (bulk 1920-1938). New-York Historical Society, 74976. #onthisday #otd #nbc #nyhscollection


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New-York Historical Society

On November 14, 1889, journalist Elizabeth Cochran, known as #NellieBly, set sail round the globe to see if she could beat the fictional record set by Phineas Fogg in Jules Verne's "Around the World in Eighty Days." 🌎🌍🌏 Journeying through Europe, Egypt, modern-day Sri Lanka, Singapore, and Hong Kong on ship, Bly traveled via train, rickshaw, sampan, horse, and donkey, sending accounts of her trip back to her editor at the New York World. Her pieces were hugely popular and increased readership for the paper. ⏱⏳⏲ On January 25, 1890—72 days, 6 hours, 11 minutes, and 14 seconds later—she arrived back in New York, successfully completing her mission! Later that year, fans could have a go themselves playing the new board game "Round the World with Nellie Bly.”
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📸 Round the World with Nellie Bly, 1890. McLoughlin Brothers, The Liman Collection at the New-York Historical Society. #otd #onthisday #JulesVerne


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New-York Historical Society

Alert! Triple #wcw! 🙌 @BillieJeanKing, astronaut Sally Ride, and Ms. Magazine editor @GloriaSteinem at a reception hosted by Girls Club of America to honor Dr. Ride in New York in August 1983.
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📸 Richard Drew / Associated Press


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New-York Historical Society

In the 19th century, women sought out patent medicines promising "relief" for everything from crying children to pregnancy itself—but who knew what was inside these bottles? Abortion was outlawed in the mid-1800s, but some women doctors and midwives dared to provide it, including Ann Trow Lohman (known as Madame Restell), whom authorities labeled the "wickedest woman" in New York.

This Friday, November 16, join us at our Center for Women's History as playwright Jessica Bashline, author of "Wickedest Woman," Dr. Ana Cepin of Physicians for Reproductive Health, and curator Sarah Gordon explore the consequences, both medically and socially, for New York's "wicked women" who tried to managed their reproductive health in the 19th century. $15. Get tix at the link in bio.
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📸 Chichester’s English Pennyroyal Pills advertising pamphlet, ca. 1887. New-York Historical Society Library, Bella C. Landauer Collection. #wickedwomen #reproductivehealth #womenatthecenter


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New-York Historical Society

On February 17, 1919, 3,000 black American veterans from the 369th Infantry Regiment of the 93rd Division—made up of mostly New Yorkers, hence their nickname the #HarlemHellfighters—paraded up Fifth Avenue in valiant return from #WorldWarI. But many whites felt threatened by African American claims to equality following the war, and in the summer of 1919, just months after vets triumphantly returned home, more than two dozen race riots broke out across the country. As lynchings increased throughout the South, NAACP organizer James Weldon Johnson dubbed the weeks of bloody violence the "Red Summer." #BlackCitizenship #VeteransDay
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📸 Homecoming parade of the 369th "Harlem Hellfighters" Infantry Regiment, New York City, 1919. National Archives.


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New-York Historical Society

Close to 400,000 black Americans served during #WorldWarI, but few African Americans saw combat because white military officers believed blacks were better suited to manual labor duties. The example set by the Harlem Hellfighters—which spent more time in continuous combat than any other American unit—directly challenged those prejudices. #BlackCitizenship
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In honor of #VeteransDay and the centennial of the armistice that ended the First World War, join us today at 2 pm for a special tour of our exhibition "Black Citizenship in the Age of Jim Crow" and meet Living Historians portraying the Harlem Hellfighters.
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📸 Charles Gustrine True Sons of Freedom, 1918. The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, GLC09121.


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New-York Historical Society

"Go to the polls tomorrow, and if you find the negro out voting, tell him to leave the polls, and if he refuses, kill him." –Insurgent leader Col. Alfred Waddell, November 1898
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On November 10, 1898, following a year-long campaign to end African American participation in politics, Colonel Alfred Waddell and armed mobs of white supremacists in Wilmington, North Carolina, burned down the city's black newspaper, the Daily Record (👆shown destroyed in the second pic), and killed dozens. They installed one of their own as mayor, and no investigation into the incident was ever conducted. This violent coup brought an end to interracial government in Wilmington. Within a few years, the state revised its constitution in order to disenfranchise its black voters and establish Jim Crow rule. Today, this event is rarely mentioned in textbooks. 👉 Learn more about disenfranchisement and #JimCrow in New York and the nation in our exhibition "Black Citizenship in the Age of Jim Crow," on view through March. #BlackCitizenship #otd
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📸 (1) Harper's Weekly, October 21, 1876. New-York Historical Society. (2) Love and Charity Hall in Wilmington during the 1898 race riots. New Hanover County Public Library.


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