New-York Historical Society@nyhistory

Founded in 1804, the New-York Historical Society is NYC's oldest museum. Join us. #becausehistorymatters

https://www.nyhistory.org/rental

Who wants sprinkles?! This delightful, multicolored #mytiffanylamp designed by visitor @helenalune is sure making us hanker for some funfetti. 😍 Share your Tiffany lamp from our Design-a-Lamp interactive and we might repost it on our page! #TiffanyTuesday


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Sad to say goodbye to the @BrooklynMuseum's incredible exhibition #DavidBowieIs, which closed yesterday, but you don't have to look far to find our #mancrushmonday elsewhere. Bowie was one of Kalinsky’s favorite subjects. @TheGarden photographer @georgekalinsky snapped this photo in 1976 at the final concert of Bowie’s US tour. Later #DavidBowie would say that he received such a good response from the crowd that "I was so nervous, I nearly threw up!" See this on view with dozens of other incredible shots in our exhibition New York Through the Lens of George Kalinsky.
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📸 David Bowie, 1976. Photo by @george.kalinsky #Bowie #NYC #georgekalinsky


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Alert! It's #NationalIceCreamDay!🍦Don't lament over calories—just pretend it's 1947, when ice cream was "fine to include in a reducing diet for it is high in protective values yet is relatively low in calories." How perfect!
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National Dairy Council. Time for ice cream. 1947. Landauer collection (unclassified: food). New-York Historical Society.


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When police handcuffs—or any handcuffs for that matter—proved too easy to escape from, the heavy canvas, metal rings, and reinforced leather straps of straitjackets enticed Harry Houdini. From the first outdoor performance in Kansas City (1915) to New York, Houston, and Boston, Houdini performed suspended from cranes or tall buildings—preferably the ones housing major local newspapers. #SummerofMagic
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See Houdini's straitjacket on view in our exhibition "Summer of Magic: Treasures from the David Copperfield Collection" and join us for an awesome slate of programs about the story of magic in New York. Visit nyhistory.org/magic for more.
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Regulation straitjacket used by Harry Houdini, ca. 1920. Copperfield Collection. #escapeartist #Houdini #straitjacket #HarryHoudini #DavidCopperfield


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On July 13, 1863, this drum-shaped wheel was used in the Civil War draft lottery that touched off the deadliest riots in American history. The violent, brutal riots were a result of escalating racial tensions and class conflicts, as poor, white Americans—many Irish—were resentful that they had to compete with freed blacks for jobs and that African Americans, not yet considered citizens, were exempt from the draft, as well as angry that only the rich could buy their way out of service by paying an exorbitant $300. Over the course of three days, the riots led to more than a million dollars in damage (about $30 million today) and at a minimum based on estimates, more than a hundred deaths. Perhaps the most unsettling and reprehensible actions during the riots was the burning of the Colored Orphan Asylum. Fortunately, no children were killed, but black New Yorkers who survived the riots had to contend with rebuilding their homes and livelihoods, destroyed in cold blood. The black population in New York declined significantly in the years following the riots.
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Draft wheel, ca. 1863. Unidentified maker. Wood, metal. 23 x 25 1/2 x 21 3/4 in.
Gift of Frederic C. Wagner. New-York Historical Society, 1865.6.


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In the final weekend of our exhibition "Feathers: Fashion and the Fight for Wildlife," which closes this Sunday, July 15, we're reminded that even the majestic Golden Eagle wasn't safe from 19th-century fashion trends—the brown feathers of this beautiful bird were often used to make fans, considering a must-have accessory of the era. 🦅 #FashionFriday #FightforFeathers
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In 1833 John James Audubon painted this female—whose length he gave as 3 feet, 2 inches, with a wingspan of 7 feet. Audubon purchased the live bird from a man who claimed that it had been caught in a trap. He so admired her that he considered restoring her to freedom but decided she was too damaged. Then, he agonized about how to euthanize her humanely to “take the portrait of the magnificent bird.” Traumatized, he labored over this powerful image for about two weeks.
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Today, the Golden Eagle is endangered by climate change, but an eagle feather law provides exceptions to federal wildlife laws to enable American Indians to continue their traditional practices. Under the current law, individuals of certifiable American Indian ancestry enrolled in a federally recognized tribe are legally authorized to obtain eagle feathers. Unauthorized persons found with an eagle or its parts can be fined up to $25,000. 👉 Learn more about the Golden Eagle from our friends at @usfws!

📸 Golden Eagle (Aquila chrysaetos), Study for Havell pl. 181, 1833. Watercolor, pastel, graphite, black ink, and black chalk with touches of gouache and selective glazing on paper, laid on card. 38 1/8 x 25 1/2 in. (96.8 x 64.8 cm). Purchased for the Society by public subscription from Mrs. John J. Audubon, 1863.17.181.

📸 Fan of eagle feathers, 1895–1900. Feathers and tortoiseshell; 22 in. (55.9 cm) Metropolitan Museum of Art, Brooklyn Museum Costume Collection, 2009.300.4297. #goldeneagle #eagle #audubon #birdyourworld #yearofthebird #protectamericanbirds #migratorybirdtreatyact


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Is there anything dreamier in the summer than a gentle breeze through your hair? Wishing you some breezy vibes (actual or metaphorical) for the end of the week, friends. ☀️
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📸 Irving Browning. Arrival Home at New York City aboard the Queen of Bermuda 1932. Browning Photograph Collection. New-York Historical Society, 63493. #TBT #summer #breeze #boat #friends #sunshine #throwbackthursday


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"Luck has nothing to do with it, because I have spent many, many hours, countless hours, on the court working for my one moment in time, not knowing when it would come." —Serena Williams ...
In 2014, one of those moments came when our #wcw defeated Caroline Wozniacki of Denmark 6-3, 6-3 to win the women’s singles title of the US Open. Luckily @TheGarden photographer George Kalinsky was there to capture it. See more iconic sports photos of the last half-century on view in our exhibition "New York through the Lens of George Kalinsky."
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@SerenaWilliams, 2014. Photo by @george.kalinsky. New-York Historical Society. #georgekalinsky #serenawilliams #womenatthecenter #work #champion #tennisplayer #icon #blackhistoryisAmericanhistory #womenshistoryisAmericanhistory #womancrushwednesday


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Blue skies, inside and out. #TiffanyTuesday ...
Photo by Jon Wallen


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Talk about a coincidence—Our #mcm environmentalist George Bird Grinnell (his real name!) was instrumental in early conservation, foreseeing the risk of the country's resources and wildlife if the "fallacy of the inexhaustible" continued. Born in Brooklyn, Grinnell grew up in Audubon Park in upper Manhattan, the former estate of naturalist-artist John James Audubon himself. After attending Yale, Grinnell worked in the West, studying the plight of the Plains Indians and the threat of commercial hunters, creating one of the earliest (perhaps the first) report on the excessive killing of big game. In 1886, Grinnell founded the Audubon Society in New York, the forerunner to the National Audubon Society, and he served on the advisory board of the Migratory Bird Treaty Act of 1918, which comprehensively changed bird hunting and commerce in the United States and saved many species. (Are you crushing yet, too?) Learn about more early environmentalists who championed the protection of American birds in our exhibition #FightforFeathers, which closes this Sunday, July 15. #YearoftheBird #BirdYourWorld
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📸 George Bird Grinnell (1849–1938). From Nathaniel Pitt Langford, Diary of the Washburn Expedition to the Yellowstone and Firehole Rivers in the year 1870, n.p. St. Paul, MN: Yellowstone National Park, 1905. New-York Historical Society Library. #protectAmericanbirds #environmentalactivism


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The vogue for wearing birds, wings, or feathers—demonstrated here on the cover of sheet music from 1906—decimated many bird species and threatened them with extinction. This dire situation galvanized environmental activists, many of them New Yorkers, to ardently campaign for groundbreaking federal legislation, passed in 1918 as the Migratory Bird Treaty Act. Explore their story in our exhibition "Feathers: Fashion and the Fight for Wildlife," on view through Sunday, July 15. Hurry before it flies away!
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Jos. W. Stern & Co., New York (1894–1919). Arthur J. Lamb (18701928) and Alfred Solman (1868–1937). Sheet music, The Bird on Nellie’s Hat, 1906
Lithograph on paper. New-York Historical Society Library, Bella C. Landauer Collection.


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Can you say #dreamwedding? ✨ New-York Historical is the perfect blend of traditional and modern for tying the knot, whether you're saying your vows in our *gawgeous* Patricia D. Klingenstein Library or any of our other breathtaking spaces. Plus, we're just steps from Central Park in the beautiful, historic neighborhood of the Upper West Side. Book your wedding today! Learn more at the link in bio. 📸: @tobegill


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