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The New York Times

The National Cowboy Poetry Gathering, now in its 35th year, draws thousands of ranch workers and Western enthusiasts to the small city of Elko, Nevada. The poets come not only to practice a tradition born of work and regional identity, but also to expand the idea of an ever-changing West. Here, odes to tools, references to John Wayne and laments about bad weather thump through performances in the @WesternFolklife Center and the Elko Convention Center. In addition to poetry, the weeklong event also includes musical performances and dance gatherings. Celebrate #WorldPoetryDay by listening to these poems, and by visiting the link in our profile to read more about this year’s gathering. @waubi_saubi made these clips while attending the event last month.


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The New York Times

The Women’s Timber Corps, playfully called “lumberjills,” were Rosie the Riveter’s counterparts across the Atlantic during World War II. The group was an elite part of England’s civilian defense efforts and it harvested timber for telegraph poles, rails for D-Day splashdowns and the pit props that defended vital British coal mines. Of the 6,000 workers who toiled in the lumber fields at the peak of the corps’ staffing, a good number were “city bred” — former shop assistants, dressmakers and factory workers. In an article published in 1944, #nytimes assured readers, “It has been found more often than not that the girl whose previous knowledge of tree life was often limited to the telegraph post can swing an axe just as efficiently as a farmer’s daughter.” A photographer shot this photo for The New York Times in 1942. Visit the link in our profile to read more, and follow @nytarchives for more #throwback photos.


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The New York Times

A makeshift levee saved the town of Hamburg, Iowa, from Missouri River floodwaters in 2011, and so residents began a desperate fight to keep it. But money needed to fix the levee never came. Now, after overflowing rivers wrecked large portions of Nebraska and Iowa over the last week, much of Hamburg is under water. The swollen Missouri River invaded houses and turned streets into canals. Residents are wondering if homes will be salvageable and if they will receive federal help to save the town from future floods. Some speak with pride about enduring nature’s whims: “We all know, living between two rivers, that something like this can happen,” said Heather Garcia, referring to the Nishnabotna and Missouri Rivers. “But it’s our home. And we just keep going.” John Hayes, another resident, was more pessimistic: “I have a gut, bad feeling that this might be the end of this little town.” @hlswift shot this photo. Visit the link in our profile to read more from Mitch Smith, who was in Hamburg this week speaking with residents and covering the flood.


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The New York Times

In the male-dominated real estate universe, women sometimes discover that a hard hat is a hard hat to wear. On being a woman in the industry, Leslie Baltes, the president of Carter, Milchman & Frank, an industrial supplier, said: “I’ve made it my business to know what I’m doing. My male contemporaries in sales don’t feel the obligation to know as much because they’re not going to be tested as much.” Women in the business describe being locked out of deals, being condescended to and having to prove their skills. Joanne Kaufman interviewed 7 women who have endured slights in workplaces dominated by men, but who thrived nonetheless and now run their own corners of the #realestate world. Visit the link in our profile to read their stories. @george_etheredge shot this photo of Leslie.


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The New York Times

A prayer mat was seen among flowers and other tributes today at the remains of a makeshift memorial for the people killed in last Friday’s terrorist attack in Christchurch, New Zealand. As the first victims of the mosque shootings were laid to rest on Wednesday, Azaam Afaan explained what it has been like to wait so long for the burials to begin: “It’s like you’re short of breath. Now we can breathe freely. They’re going to the place they’re supposed to be.” But as of Wednesday night some families were still waiting for their loved ones’ bodies to be returned to them and buried. @adamjdean shot this photo near Al Noor Mosque in Christchurch. Visit the link in our profile to read more, including profiles of many of the victims.


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The New York Times

Regina Hall is getting more attention and critical acclaim for her roles. She’s at the heart of @showtime’s Wall Street satire “Black Monday,” will co-star in the film comedy “Little,” with @issarae, in April, and in a “Shaft” sequel, in June. But it's not as though she's any more talented than she was 5 years ago — she's always been this good, and now Hollywood is paying closer attention. “It’s weird,” @morereginahall said. “I’ve always had steady work, but I guess there are lists in Hollywood. I was on the top of one before; now I’m on the bottom of a more difficult one.” @nytmag “Talk” columnist David Marchese recently sat down with Regina to discuss the 2 Hollywoods, spirituality and success. Visit the link in our profile to read more. @mamadivisuals shot this photo of Regina.


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The New York Times

These “juhyo,” or ice or snow monsters, are naturally formed by ice and snow, encasing conifer trees spread across Japan’s northern mountains. They’re threatened by climate change. Researchers have tracked a steady deterioration of the juhyo — both in the acreage they cover and the length of the season in which they can be seen — because of warming temperatures that melt the snow earlier and at higher elevations. The trees are also being ravaged by moths that gobble up their needles and a species of bark beetles that have been killing otherwise healthy trees in the last 5 years. Fumitaka Yanagisawa, a professor of geochemistry who studies the #juhyo at Yamagata University, said he’s worried about greenhouse effects. “By the end of the century, the juhyo will disappear from earth.” @jameswhitlowdelano shot these photos in Yamagata Prefecture. Visit the link in our profile to see more.


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The New York Times

#SpeakingInDance | “At this point, I’m getting to my hat and I’m afraid of it, but there’s a certain power in it,” said the @ballethispanico dancer Jenna Marie. “And that’s what I’m afraid of — accepting my power.” In “Sombrerísimo,” the choreographer @annabellelopezochoa was thinking about the surrealist René Magritte — specifically, his paintings of men in bowler hats. Originally created for male dancers, “Sombrerísimo,” will be performed by women for the first time in New York City beginning March 26 at the @thejoycetheater, where it will be danced to dream pop arranged by Titus Tiel. For @its_jennamarie, that’s exciting: “We asked for it,” she said. “It’s a privilege to be able to perform an all-women’s piece.” The dance is also exhausting. “By the end of the piece, you can’t breathe, you can’t feel your muscles,” she told the #nytimes writer @giadk. “But it’s like we’re in this together, and we made it: We’re empowered, we’re stronger and we’re better women for it.” @_flodur made this silent video for #SpeakingInDance, our weekly series exploring the world of #dance.


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The New York Times

Before they appear in “Star Wars: Episode IX,” Adam Driver and Keri Russell are bringing an unruly love story to Broadway. The 2 star in Lanford Wilson’s “Burn This,” a combustible 1987 play about the unlikely romance between Anna (Keri), a serious-minded choreographer, and Pale (Adam), a hothead restaurant manager. The show collides the 2 masterly yet hugely dissimilar actors. “This crazy first moment where they meet, it’s so intimate, so raw,” Keri said. “These people need to live gigantic lives in order to feel something," Adam said. "These people want to feel something big. We’re not often given that space to feel.” #nytimes writer Alexis Soloski sat down with the actors to discuss big feelings, fierce chemistry and whether or not they cross lightsabers. Visit the link in our profile to read more from the conversation. @eriktanner shot this photo.


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The New York Times

In an effort to get Baltimore’s criminal element to put down their weapons for one weekend every 3 months, Erricka Bridgeford started @baltimoreceasefire. The group’s main slogan? “Nobody Kill Anybody.” Their second? “Don’t Be Numb.” Here, Erricka was photographed by @pvanagtmael while performing a spiritual cleanse at the site of a recent murder. Since Freddie Gray’s death in 2015, violent crime in Baltimore has spiked to levels unseen for a quarter century. “Explaining all this to people outside Baltimore is difficult, not only because the experience is alien to those even in cities just up or down the Interstate from us,” writes Alec MacGillis, a reporter for ProPublica. “It’s also because the national political discourse lacks a vocabulary for the city’s ills.” In a collaboration between @propublica and @nytmag, Alec examined how nearly 4 years after Freddie Gray’s death, the surge in crime has once again become the context of daily life in the city, as it was in the early 1990s. Visit the link in our profile to read more.


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The New York Times

Here in the Mindanao islands of the southern Philippines, long a haven for insurgents because of dense wilderness and weak policing, ISIS has attracted a range of militant jihadists, Hannah Beech and Jason Gutierrez report. The Islamic State first made a big push for recruitment here in 2016. In 2017, they took over the city of Marawi in Mindanao. By the time the army prevailed 6 months later, the largest Muslim majority city in the country was in ruins. President Duterte of the Philippines has since declared victory over ISIS. But his triumphalism apparently has not deterred its loyalists from regrouping. ISIS claimed a pair of its suicide bombers were responsible for the January 27 cathedral bombing on the island of Jolo that killed 23 people. @jeszmann shot this photo of soldiers inspecting vehicles last month in Zamboanga, the gateway to the southern islands of Jolo and Basilan, where the nation’s Muslim minority is concentrated and local insurgencies have long battled the state. Visit the link in our profile to read more.


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The New York Times

A historic snowy winter has turned into record spring flooding across a wide area in the middle of the U.S. Major rivers have spilled over their banks, broken levees and inundated towns and farms. The governors of Nebraska, South Dakota, and Wisconsin have declared emergencies, and Iowa’s governor has issued a disaster proclamation. Hundreds of families have fled their homes and at least 3 people have died. Rain was the immediate cause of the flooding. It fell upon a frozen, snow-covered region that was unable to absorb much of the blow. “The higher-than-average precipitation, combined with warm temperatures, snowmelt and the frozen ground, was a perfect storm for flooding,” said Mindy Beerends, a senior meteorologist at the Des Moines office of @nws. This is a developing story. Visit the link in our profile to read more, including how the floods have left a toll on farmers and ranchers. @ackermangruber shot this aerial photo in Hamburg, Iowa on Monday.


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