Smithsonian@smithsonian

We're more than a museum. We're 19 of them and the National Zoo. #BecauseOfHerStory Legal: http://s.si.edu/legal

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Smithsonian

Another gorgeous wedding photo on your feed: Susette La Flesche (Inshata-Theumba, Omaha) wore this skirt and jacket trimmed in hand-stitched silk, satin and lace to marry Thomas Tibbles in July 1881. It's now in @smithsoniannmai.
Raised with Omaha and Western culture, La Flesche was born in present-day Nebraska, into a family descended from significant tribal leaders on both sides.
In 1877, she witnessed the expulsion of the Ponca from Nebraska to Indian Territory and the subsequent imprisonment of Standing Bear and other Poncas who attempted to return to their homeland.
These events launched La Flesche's career as an activist. She visited eastern cities, arguing against the involuntary removal of Native people and for Indian citizenship rights.
Both La Flesche and Tibbles played major roles in the 1879 civil rights decision that ended the Ponca imprisonment and led to the historic ruling, “An Indian is a person within the meaning of the law of the United States.” Their wedding was held on restored Ponca land. #BecauseOfHerStory


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Smithsonian

Visit our Arts and Industries Building this weekend and don’t forget to look up.
Our Arts and Industries Building opened in 1881 as the country's first National Museum. Currently, the space is open for special occasions while we develop it as a place for imagining the future.
You can see it this weekend for the @_bythepeople_ festival. #ByThePeople has filled the historic space with contemporary art installations—this is a detail from Victor Ekpuk's “Eye See You” in the rotunda.
The building is also a great place to plan your visit today for #SolsticeSaturday (until midnight!), when we're open late to celebrate the first Saturday of the summer. Details at si.edu/solsticesaturday (link in bio).


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Smithsonian

It's the #SummerSolstice! Barbara White designed this "Ascending Suns" sidewall, dated 1958–70, that's in our @cooperhewitt.
June 22, we'll celebrate the first Saturday of summer—#SolsticeSaturday—by staying open late and hosting parties, programs, and performances. Most Smithsonian museums will be open until midnight welcoming visitors to the free festivities, held in association with #ByThePeople and Hofstra University’s Department of Physics and Astronomy.
Get all the details at si.edu/solsticesaturday (link in bio).


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Smithsonian

Votes for women: the power of branding.✨
Eye-catching marketing, products, and even dresses have helped women get their message across throughout history.
Today we visited three exhibitions that tell the long, complicated story of women and voting, considering what the 19th Amendment accomplished and who it left out. See our Instagram Story for our #HerVote100 tour. #BecauseOfHerStory
1️⃣2️⃣3️⃣Program for the 1913 D.C. suffrage march, tray, and tea set in our @smithsoniannpg's "#VotesForWomen: A Portrait of Persistence"
4️⃣5️⃣6️⃣Parade banner, 1953 dress to support President Eisenhower, and set of political pins in @usnatarchives' "#RightfullyHers: American Women and the Vote”
7️⃣8️⃣9️⃣Fan, tote for distributing a weekly suffrage newspaper, and cookbook in @librarycongress' "#ShallNotBeDenied: Women Fight for the Vote”


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Smithsonian

On June 19, 1865, word reached enslaved African Americans in Galveston Bay, Texas. Two years after the Emancipation Proclamation, which could not be implemented in places still under Confederate control, Union troops rode into the state where 250,000 people remained enslaved until the war’s end. Known as #Juneteenth, this day is widely celebrated as the end of chattel slavery in the U.S.
Before the Civil War, African Americans who were free needed to carry a freedom paper with them. They could be stopped on the street and required to show this document that proved their freedom.
Joseph Trammell was born enslaved in Virginia in 1831, and eventually gained his freedom. He knew how crucial it was to have the paper with him because if something happened to it, he would be enslaved again. So he built this tin wallet to protect it and keep it from getting lost, which is now in our @nmaahc.
Every night when he came back after a day of work, Trammell would take the freedom paper out of his wallet and tell his family about the meaning of freedom—how hard it was to gain and how to never take it for granted.


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Smithsonian

Public Enemy started using this boombox in 1987, the year they released their debut album "Yo! Bum Rush the Show." One of the most influential, pioneering and controversial rap groups in the history of hip-hop, Public Enemy voiced statements of protest, activism and social revolution to their audience.
The boombox came on tour in the 1980s and again in the 2000s, providing music for their travels and acting as a stage prop during their shows. Now it's on view in our @nmaahc's "Musical Crossroads" exhibition. #SmithsonianMusic #BlackMusicMonth 📻: Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, Gift of Public Enemy


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Smithsonian

In this quiet scene from a #Pride weekend, three women join hands, together in the movement to ensure equal protection for the transgender community.
Sylvia Rivera sits between her partner Julia Murray (right) and activist Christina Hayworth, in a @smithsoniannpg photo by Luis Carle at the Saturday Rally before New York’s Gay Pride Parade in 2000.
Rivera was at the Stonewall riots of 1969, the turning point of the modern LGBTQ struggle for equal rights, when patrons of the Stonewall Inn violently rebuffed a police raid.
But she faced racism and discrimination as a transgender Latina by the mostly white cisgender male leadership of the Gay Activist Alliance that she campaigned with.
Rivera—who had been cast out by family as a teenager—began to work with homeless teens in New York City. She co-founded the militant group and shelter Street Transvestite Action Revolutionaries (STAR) with her friend Marsha P. Johnson, an African American transgender woman. #SmithsonianPride #BecauseOfHerStory 📸: © Luis Carle


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Smithsonian

Studying the past helps us understand the present and informs choices we need to make for a better future. Deep Time is OUR story.
Science shows us that human civilization is but a short afterword to a 3.7-billion-year-long epic poem. But in our short time on Earth, humans have caused change at a rate and scale never seen before in our planet’s history.
#DeepTime ends by inspiring us to think urgently, but hopefully, about our future. We can adapt, innovate, and collaborate to leave a positive legacy on the planet.
Thanks for following my takeover this week, and follow @SmithsonianNMNH for more about our new exhibition! — Siobhan Starrs, #DeepTime project manager


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Smithsonian

Meet the fossil version of the turducken. Our 20-foot-long predatory marine reptile Tylosaurus contains a two-for-one lunch special.
In the fossil’s stomach cavity, we discovered its last meal: a plesiosaur, or flippered marine reptile. But wait—what’s that? The stomach ALSO contained the bones of the plesiosaur’s last meal: small fishes and invertebrates. — Siobhan Starrs, @SmithsonianNMNH #DeepTime project manager


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Smithsonian

Working on #DeepTime, I’ve met some of the coolest people who do amazing jobs that I want to have in another life. The fossil preparators build dinosaurs and mammals for exhibits, and sometimes go find fossils and bring them back to the museum. Artisans design and create intricate metal brackets to hold specimens. Each one is like a piece of jewelry, specifically designed for the fossil it will hold. Once the brackets are done, installers carefully…carefully…put the specimens into the exhibit.
Here they are standing under the T. rex pelvis, the biggest, heaviest bone and the first one to be installed. Swipe for a time lapse video of the installation, and the glamour shot of the result. #ThisPaleoLife — Siobhan Starrs, @SmithsonianNMNH #DeepTime project manager


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Smithsonian

Can you spot the smallest and tallest parts of #DeepTime? The smallest individual fossil in the exhibition is a vertebra (backbone) of an early snake called Coniophis sp. It’s less than a centimeter across—but over 66 MILLION YEARS OLD.
And on the other side of the spectrum: Diplodocus. Stretched out, this big guy is 87 feet long, more than 13 feet tall, and would have weighed 12 to 13 tons in life. Diplodocus’ massive size makes me ask BIG questions: How did they get to be THAT big? What is it like to live THAT large? I hope people come to #DeepTime and start asking their own questions. Or become a scientist, and start answering some! — Siobhan Starrs, @SmithsonianNMNH #DeepTime project manager


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Smithsonian

I am always amazed by how many famous or iconic fossils we have in the museum’s collection. One of my favorites is this touchable upper arm bone, or humerus, from a Brachiosaurus.
Scientists know that based on the height of this bone, this giant weighed about 65 tons when it was alive. That’s MASSIVE. This bone is the single largest dinosaur bone ever found in North America. — Siobhan Starrs, @SmithsonianNMNH #DeepTime project manager


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