Steve Winter@stevewinterphoto

NatGeo Wildlife + Conservation Photojournalist + Speaker.
Next @NatGeo Live! talk Oct 1st. Nashville, TN. Click on link👇🏼 for tix and more tour stops

bit.ly/2MzGJGK

589 posts 593,989 followers 445 following

Steve Winter

@natgeo photo by @stevewinterphoto @savewildtigers @royalalberthall
Visit the Royal Albert Hall for an amazing photo exhibition - "Eye of the Tiger" which runs from Sept. 18th to October 14th
Over the course of a century, tiger numbers have plummeted from about 100,000 to perhaps 3,800 today. They face a litany of threats, from poaching and the illegal wildlife trade to the pillage of their remaining habitat, conflict with people and disappearing prey. I hope these images inspire people to act. Together, we can insure the long-term survival of one of the planet’s most iconic animals— the largest and most endangered of the world’s big cats.” 30 of the World’s best photographers speaking eloquently via their cameras in stunning pictures that bring global attention to the biggest Cat of them all - The TIGER!!! The World’s largest photographic exhibition of Tiger images from the world’s leading photographers - "Eye of the Tiger" is at the Royal Albert Hall - and runs from Sept. 18th to October 14th
Please go see this incredible show of the best of the best - from Michael “Nick” Nichols, Mike Birkhead, Chris Brunskill, Aditya “Dicky” Singh, Andy Rouse, Theo Allofs, Steve Bloom,
Suzi Eszterhas, E. A. Kuttapan, Steve Winter, Toshiji Fukuda, Theo Webb, Bjorn Persson and others.

@savewildtigers @natgeocreative @natgeo @stevewinterphoto #BEINSPIRED #EyeOnTheTiger #savewildtigers #endwildlifecrime @royalalberthall @natgeofineart


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Steve Winter

@natgeo photo by @stevewinterphoto

A leopard cub making one of his first attempts to go DOWN a tree where his mother stashed a impala. They made it!
There are nine sub-species of leopards on earth, occurring from the southern tip of South Africa's Cape mountains to the island of Java in southeast Asia. The leopard can live in true deserts, tropical forests and even in the Russian tundra where it drops to below 10 degrees celsius! The biggest threats facing leopards in Africa include the illegal skin trade, wire snare poaching and human-leopard conflict. This was shot while on assignment for National Geographic Magazine (Dec 2015 issue) with. National Geographic launched the Big Cats Initiative to raise awareness and implement conservation action for big cats.

Forests provide us with up to 50% of the oxygen we breathe - oceans the rest.Forest, grasslands and mountains give us 75% of the fresh water.
If we can save the forest of the Amazon and other areas in Central and South America for the jaguar and Puma. The forests of Central Africa for the leopard, lion, elephants etc. And the forests of South Asia for the Tigers and Leopards. If you save the top predator in any ecosystem you save everything that lives with them.
So if - We Save Big Cats we can help Save Ourselves.
follow me @stevewinterphoto to see more images and thanks!

#follow me @stevewinterphoto to see other images, thanks!
@natgeo @thephotosociety @natgeocreative @eiainvestigator #leopards#photooftheday @africanparksnetwork @sanctuaryasia @CanonUSA @reddigitalcinema


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Steve Winter

@natgeo photo by @stevewinterphoto

A leopard cub making one of his first attempts to go DOWN a tree where his mother stashed a impala.
There are nine sub-species of leopards on earth, occurring from the southern tip of South Africa's Cape mountains to the island of Java in southeast Asia. The leopard can live in true deserts, tropical forests and even in the Russian tundra where it drops to below 10 degrees celsius! The biggest threats facing leopards in Africa include the illegal skin trade, wire snare poaching and human-leopard conflict. This was shot while on assignment for National Geographic Magazine (Dec 2015 issue) with. National Geographic launched the Big Cats Initiative to raise awareness and implement conservation action for big cats.

Forests provide us with up to 50% of the oxygen we breathe - oceans the rest.Forest, grasslands and mountains give us 75% of the fresh water.
If we can save the forest of the Amazon and other areas in Central and South America for the jaguar and Puma. The forests of Central Africa for the leopard, lion, elephants etc. And the forests of South Asia for the Tigers and Leopards. If you save the top predator in any ecosystem you save everything that lives with them.
So if - We Save Big Cats we can help Save Ourselves.
follow me @stevewinterphoto to see more images and thanks!

#follow me @stevewinterphoto to see other images, thanks!
@natgeo @thephotosociety @natgeocreative @eiainvestigator #leopards#photooftheday @africanparksnetwork @sanctuaryasia @CanonUSA


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Steve Winter

@natgeo photo by @stevewinterphoto
Visit the Royal Albert Hall for an amazing photo exhibition - "Eye of the Tiger" which runs from Sept. 18th to October 14th
You can buy this and all of the images at the gallery.
Over the course of a century, tiger numbers have plummeted from about 100,000 to perhaps 3,800 today. They face a litany of threats, from poaching and the illegal wildlife trade to the pillage of their remaining habitat, conflict with people and disappearing prey. I hope these images inspire people to act. Together, we can insure the long-term survival of one of the planet’s most iconic animals— the largest and most endangered of the world’s big cats.” 30 of the World’s best photographers speaking eloquently via their cameras in stunning pictures that bring global attention to the biggest Cat of them all - The TIGER!!! The World’s largest photographic exhibition of Tiger images from the world’s leading photographers - "Eye of the Tiger" is at the Royal Albert Hall - and runs from Sept. 18th to October 14th
Please go see this incredible show of the best of the best - from Michael “Nick” Nichols, Mike Birkhead, Chris Brunskill, Aditya “Dicky” Singh, Andy Rouse, Theo Allofs, Steve Bloom,
Suzi Eszterhas, E. A. Kuttapan, Steve Winter, Toshiji Fukuda, Theo Webb, Bjorn Persson and others.

@savewildtigers @natgeocreative @natgeo @stevewinterphoto


269

Steve Winter

@natgeo photo by @stevewinterphoto
Visit the Royal Albert Hall for an amazing photo exhibition - "Eye of the Tiger" which runs from Sept. 18th to October 14th
Over the course of a century, tiger numbers have plummeted from about 100,000 to perhaps 3,800 today. They face a litany of threats, from poaching and the illegal wildlife trade to the pillage of their remaining habitat, conflict with people and disappearing prey. I hope these images inspire people to act. Together, we can insure the long-term survival of one of the planet’s most iconic animals— the largest and most endangered of the world’s big cats.” 30 of the World’s best photographers speaking eloquently via their cameras in stunning pictures that bring global attention to the biggest Cat of them all - The TIGER!!! The World’s largest photographic exhibition of Tiger images from the world’s leading photographers - "Eye of the Tiger" is at the Royal Albert Hall - and runs from Sept. 18th to October 14th
Please go see this incredible show of the best of the best - from Michael “Nick” Nichols, Mike Birkhead, Chris Brunskill, Aditya “Dicky” Singh, Andy Rouse, Theo Allofs, Steve Bloom,
Suzi Eszterhas, E. A. Kuttapan, Steve Winter, Toshiji Fukuda, Theo Webb, Bjorn Persson and others.

@savewildtigers @natgeocreative @natgeo @stevewinterphoto


115

Steve Winter

@natgeo photo by @stevewinterphoto
Visit the Royal Albert Hall for an amazing photo exhibition - "Eye of the Tiger" which runs from Sept. 18th to October 14th
Over the course of a century, tiger numbers have plummeted from about 100,000 to perhaps 3,800 today. They face a litany of threats, from poaching and the illegal wildlife trade to the pillage of their remaining habitat, conflict with people and disappearing prey. I hope these images inspire people to act. Together, we can insure the long-term survival of one of the planet’s most iconic animals— the largest and most endangered of the world’s big cats.” 30 of the World’s best photographers speaking eloquently via their cameras in stunning pictures that bring global attention to the biggest Cat of them all - The TIGER!!! The World’s largest photographic exhibition of Tiger images from the world’s leading photographers - "Eye of the Tiger" is at the Royal Albert Hall - and runs from Sept. 18th to October 14th
Please go see this incredible show of the best of the best - from Michael “Nick” Nichols, Mike Birkhead, Chris Brunskill, Aditya “Dicky” Singh, Andy Rouse, Theo Allofs, Steve Bloom,
Suzi Eszterhas, E. A. Kuttapan, Steve Winter, Toshiji Fukuda, Theo Webb, Bjorn Persson and others.

@savewildtigers @natgeocreative @natgeo @stevewinterphoto


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Steve Winter

@stevewinterphoto @natgeo @africanparksnetwork
A flock of quelea and an elephant at a waterhole in Zakouma NP.
Zakouma is just one of 15 parks managed by conservation NGO African Parks (@africanparksnetwork). If you want to see wild plains teeming with lions, leopards, herds of elephants, giraffe, and now rhinos (they just reintroduced black rhinos after a 50-year absence) and no tourists - go to Zakouma - check out the lodges there and in the other parks the manage in 8 other countries via their website. Tourism revenue goes back to the parks they manage and important community projects like education, healthcare and improved livelihoods.

What is happening in Zakouma is one of the most hopeful stories in conservation. The park was once ravaged by poaching and insecurity. More than 4,000 elephants, which was 95% of the population, were slaughtered between 2002 to 2010 for the sale of their ivory – and poachers wreaked havoc on both the wildlife and people who lived there. By 2010, only 450 elephants remained. That same year, @africanparksnetwork signed a long-term agreement with the government of Chad to fully manage Zakouma and change the trajectory of the park. They built a ranger team and implemented effective law enforcement measures and community networks, and today poaching has been practically eliminated. The elephant population is finally on the rise for the first time in a decade. Elephants have surpassed 550 individuals, and not one has been lost to poaching since January 2016. Last year @africanparksnetwork counted 81 elephant calves under the age of three years old; in 2011 they counted one. Without the support of local communities this would not work. The park is the largest employer in the region; thousands of people are getting an education and healthcare, and decency and civility, along with life, have found their back to this once forgotten place. To learn more about Zakouma and other truly hopeful conservation efforts happening across Africa, please follow @africanparksnetwork


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Steve Winter

@natgeo @stevewinterphoto @naturalworldsafaris
In the December 2017 @NatGeo magazine I had an image of a mom and 2 cubs - an image I had waited for and wanted for years. This week I took this image of the same 2 brother cubs that are now a bit over 2 years old and they are still hanging out together!

This animal behavior is so similar in many ways to us as humans! Our animal family is so much like us - they find mates, they have kids, they have to feed themselves and their families. If we can find a way to believe they think, feel and have emotions, we need to treat them better and find a way to ensure their future on this planet. They are keystone species in their ecosystems, though we as humans are not.

Jaguars are the 3rd largest of the big cats. Found from US / Mexico border to northern Argentina. Jaguars have rebounded in this area where 95% of the land is privately owned. In the past many ranchers would kill the cats when they ate their cattle. Today in this area tourism brings in much more money to the local economy than cattle ranching. So the jaguar population is increasing. But revenge killings of jaguars happen close to this area and all throughout the jaguars range. Also poaching for skins, bones and teeth is growing for the first time since the 1970’s to feed the demand for people who think they receive the “power of the jaguar through their teeth”, Chinese Traditional Medicine and now Luxury items from endangered species. “When the buying stops, the killing can too.” @wildaid

My first story with big cats was the 1st @natgeo Jaguar story 20 years ago! It has changed my life working with the magical and magnificent cats of the world. Animals have emotions just like we have.

Follow me @stevewinterphoto to see more images and THANKS!

@natgeo @nglive #@natgeochannel @natgeowild @thephotosociety @natgeocreative @africanparksnetwork @jaguar #jaguar @pantanalsafaris


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Steve Winter

@natgeo @stevewinterphoto @naturalworldsafaris.
Mating Jaguars and other big cats can be a very violent affair. Here a male is all scratched up from the female I posted yesterday. This was photographed last week in the Brazilian Pantanal.

Our animal family is so much like us - they find mates, they have kids, they have to feed themselves and their families. If we can find a way to believe they think, feel and have emotions we will all be better humans. We need to treat them better and find a way to ensure their future on this planet. They are keystone species in their ecosystems, though we as humans are not.

Jaguars are the 3rd largest of the big cats. Found from US / Mexico border to northern Argentina. Jaguars have rebounded in this area where 95% of the land is privately owned. In the past many ranchers would kill the cats when they ate their cattle. Today in this area tourism brings in much more money to the local economy than cattle ranching. So the jaguar population is increasing. But revenge killings of jaguars happen close to this area and all throughout the jaguars range. Also poaching for skins, bones and teeth is growing for the first time since the 1970’s to feed the demand for people who think they receive the “power of the jaguar through their teeth”, Chinese Traditional Medicine and now Luxury items from endangered species. “When the buying stops, the killing can too.” @wildaid
My first story with big cats was the 1st @natgeo Jaguar story 20 years ago! It has changed my life working with the magical and magnificent cats of the world. Animals have emotions just like we have.

Follow me @stevewinterphoto to see more images and THANKS!

@stevewinterphoto @natgeo @nglive #nglive @natgeochannel @natgeowild @thephotosociety @natgeocreative @africanparksnetwork @jaguar #jaguar @pantanalsafaris #rightplacerighttime #naturalworldsafaris


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Steve Winter

@natgeo @stevewinterphoto

In the December 2017 @NatGeo magazine I had an image of a mom and 2 cubs - an image I had waited for and wanted for years. This week, while on safari with @naturalworldsafaris, I took this image of the same 2 brother cubs that are now a bit over 2 years old and they are still hanging out together!

This animal behavior is so similar in many ways to us as humans! Our animal family is so much like us - they find mates, they have kids, they have to feed themselves and their families. If we can find a way to believe they think, feel and have emotions, we need to treat them better and find a way to ensure their future on this planet. They are keystone species in their ecosystems, though we as humans are not.

Jaguars are the 3rd largest of the big cats. Found from US / Mexico border to northern Argentina. Jaguars have rebounded in this area where 95% of the land is privately owned. In the past many ranchers would kill the cats when they ate their cattle. Today in this area tourism brings in much more money to the local economy than cattle ranching. So the jaguar population is increasing. But revenge killings of jaguars happen close to this area and all throughout the jaguars range. Also poaching for skins, bones and teeth is growing for the first time since the 1970’s to feed the demand for people who think they receive the “power of the jaguar through their teeth”, Chinese Traditional Medicine and now Luxury items from endangered species. “When the buying stops, the killing can too.” @wildaid

My first story with big cats was the 1st @natgeo Jaguar story 20 years ago! It has changed my life working with the magical and magnificent cats of the world. Animals have emotions just like we have.

Follow me @stevewinterphoto to see more images and THANKS!

@natgeo @nglive #nglive @natgeochannel @natgeowild @thephotosociety @natgeocreative @africanparksnetwork @jaguar #jaguar @pantanalsafaris #rightplacerighttime


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Steve Winter

@stevewinterphoto on safari with @naturalworldsafaris.
Mating Jaguars and other big cats can be a very violent affair. Here a female is telling the male to back off. This was photographed last week in the Brazilian Pantanal.

Our animal family is so much like us - they find mates, they have kids, they have to feed themselves and their families. If we can find a way to believe they think, feel and have emotions we will all be better humans. We need to treat them better and find a way to ensure their future on this planet. They are keystone species in their ecosystems, though we as humans are not.

Jaguars are the 3rd largest of the big cats. Found from US / Mexico border to northern Argentina. Jaguars have rebounded in this area where 95% of the land is privately owned. In the past many ranchers would kill the cats when they ate their cattle. Today in this area tourism brings in much more money to the local economy than cattle ranching. So the jaguar population is increasing. But revenge killings of jaguars happen close to this area and all throughout the jaguars range. Also poaching for skins, bones and teeth is growing for the first time since the 1970’s to feed the demand for people who think they receive the “power of the jaguar through their teeth”, Chinese Traditional Medicine and now Luxury items from endangered species. “When the buying stops, the killing can too.” @wildaid
My first story with big cats was the 1st @natgeo Jaguar story 20 years ago! It has changed my life working with the magical and magnificent cats of the world. Animals have emotions just like we have.

Follow me @stevewinterphoto to see more images and THANKS!

@stevewinterphoto @natgeo @nglive #nglive @natgeochannel @natgeowild @thephotosociety @natgeocreative @africanparksnetwork @jaguar #jaguar @pantanalsafaris #rightplacerighttime #naturalworldsafaris


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Steve Winter

@natgeo photo by @stevewinterphoto
Capturing the lions in South Africa for @AfricanParksNetwork - The matriarch of this pride has her 4 new cubs with her 4 sub-adults so this is a tricky situation - but the pro capture team and incredible Wildlife Vet Mike - make sure that the whole process concludes without a single issue!
Just as of last week, lions are roaring in Liwonde National Park in Malawi after decades of being extinct thanks to the work of @AfricanParksNetwork , the Malawian Government, @LionRecovery @leonardodicapriofdn and @leonardodicaprio .
Liwonde National Park was recently on the verge of collapse just 3 years ago -the park was overrun with poaching and more wire snares existed in the park than large animals. But in 2015, @AfricanParksNetwork assumed management of the park on behalf of the Government, and immediately got to work training and outfitting their Ranger unit, preventing poaching, removing almost 30,000 snares, and making the park safe for nature's return. In 2017 they reintroduced cheetahs, and just as of August 16th, they reintroduced lions to restore this iconic species to the park, and help balance natural systems by bringing back critically needed predators. This population is expected to triple in the next few years - and will be supplemented with individuals from other parks African Parks manages in Malawi to ensure for a healthy genepool - as well as help with tourism to the park, benefiting the surrounding local communities. There are fewer than 20,000 lions left in Africa, down from 200,000 just 100 years ago - and their long-term future remains in question: they are threatened by habitat loss and fragmentation, lack of prey, unsustainable hunting and now poaching for their skins, bones, claws and other body parts. But projects like these show how with determination, political will, community support, and simply envisioning a better future, we can bring this species back as well as protect our last wild landscapes, benefiting both wildlife and people, and creating a better existence for all. To learn more about this project and other inspiring conservation stories from across Africa, please follow @AfricanParksNetwork


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