Brian Skerry@brianskerry

Wildlife Photojournalist for National Geographic Magazine @natgeo. New book - SHARK - available wherever books are sold!

http://www.BrianSkerry.com/

280 posts 672,004 followers 191 following

Photo by @BrianSkerry.
A leatherback sea turtle crawls back to the sea after laying her eggs on the beach at Sandy Point, located on the island of St. Croix in the US Virgin Islands. Listed as vulnerable, this species of sea turtle has an ancestry that dates back more than 100 million years. Today they face a number of anthropogenic stresses - including entanglement in fishing gear, poaching and climate change - which affects the sex of turtle hatchlings. Sandy Point is a National Wildlife Refuge, managed by the US Fish & Wildlife Service who are responsible for protecting these nesting beaches. The combination of conservation efforts here and in the nearby Buck Island Reef National Monument have benefitted sea turtle species in this region.

I made this photo under moonlight at 2am, after weeks of working at night on these beaches. Being in this place with these ancient animals was like traveling back in time to a primordial Earth.

This picture won first place in the Reptiles and Amphibians Category of the Wildlife Photographer of the Year Competition on October 17th in London.

Photographed for the February 2017 cover story in @natgeo about saving our oceans.

#WPY53 #conservation #climatechange #seaturtle #travelphoto #follow #travelphotography #photography #naturephotography #turtle #cute #longexposure #followme #natgeo #stcroix #usvi #caribbean #ocean #beach #turle #sea #climate #nightphoto #night

St. Croix USVI
167

Photo by @BrianSkerry.
A red pigfish swims through a school of blue maomao in New Zealand’s Poor Knights Islands. This region was protected as a no-take marine reserve in the 1980s and because of this protection, marine life has rebounded in the region. Marine reserves are replenishment zones for fish and other wildlife, serving as barriers to dangerous weather and helping to fight the adverse effects of climate change and ocean acidification.
Approximately 98% of Earth’s biosphere - the areas where life can exist on the planet - is ocean, yet only about 3% is protected. When we consider that every other breath that a human takes comes from the sea - more than 50% of the oxygen we need to live - it becomes clear that protecting more of the ocean is in our species' best interest. The ocean has the ability to heal and restore itself, but it needs our help.

@thephotosociety
#red #pigfish #newzealand #natgeo #nat #geo #nationalgeographic #photooftheday#nz #folowme #follow #instagood #underwaterphoto #underwaterphotography
#photography
#travelphotography #travelphoto

New Zealand
172

Photo by @BrianSkerry
Orca Moon : An orca swims beneath a rising full moon near the beach in Punta Norte, Argentina. Orcas are the largest species of dolphin and are highly intelligent. Many dolphins have developed special feeding strategies to catch prey, techniques that are unique to the location in which they live. This one family of orca living in Patagonia have developed a feeding strategy that has them beaching themselves in order to grab a sea lion pup. Their timing must be perfect and they must select a precise location where the geography is ideal.
@thephotosociety

#onassignment #orca #patagonia #killerwhale #dolphin #argentina #latinamerica #followme #follow #instagood #travelphoto #travelphotography #natgeo #wanderlust #nationalgeographic

Punta Norte
176

Photo by @BrianSkerry.
A large, male Harp Seal blows bubbles - in a display of territoriality - beneath the ice of Canada’s Gulf of St. Lawrence. Thinning ice due to climate change over the past decade has caused problems for this species, with ice no longer available as a means of escaping predators. Survival long term will require adapting to the future loss of sea ice.

Photographed on assignment for @NatGeo.

@thephotosociety
#harp #seal #cute #nature #arctic#cold #ocean #conservation #photography #playful #protect #photooftheday #nikonlove #nikonnofilter #harpseal #arctic #travelphoto #travelphotography #instagood #icediving

Gulf Of St. Lawrence
164

Photo by @BrianSkerry.
A Caribbean reef shark feeds on a lionfish on a coral reef in Honduras. Lionfish, a species native to the Pacific Ocean, were introduced to the Atlantic some time ago and have become an invasive species, preying on many other species of fish and disrupting the ecosystem in many areas. Off the island of Roatan, Honduras, shark biologists have helped sharks acquire a taste for lionfish and natural predation may now be reducing lionfish populations in this region. 
Photographed on assignment for @NatGeo Magazine.
@thephotosociety
#sharks #honduras #lionfish #predation #invasivespecies #sharkphotography #savesharks #pacific #atlantic #underwaterphoto #underwaterphotography #followme #follow #nikonnofilter #nikonambassador #nikonlove #photooftheday #instagood

Honduras
378

Photo by @BrianSkerry
'Synchronized Swimming’ - A group of spotted dolphins at play in The Bahamas. Dolphins have the largest brains in the animal kingdom relative to body size, after humans, but their brains function differently than humans. Dolphins keep one half of their brain awake while sleeping because they are voluntary breathers and must also remain vigilant for predators. They also see much of their world acoustically using echolocation. For researchers, dolphin lives remain largely a mystery and understanding the full extent of how these complex animals live may take a long time.
Photographed on assignment for @natgeo

@natgeocreative #dolphins #animalcognition #bahamas #oceansoul #photooftheday #NikonLove #NikonAmbassador


235

Photo by @BrianSkerry
A young harbor seal plays in kelp forest near the surface at Cortes Banks, a range of underwater mountains located 100-miles off the coast of San Diego, CA. This location, well known for stormy weather and giant waves, is a hotspot of biodiversity with an abundance of marine life found there. Places like this are oases of life in the sea, where each animal plays a role. Yet such places could easily be destroyed by a single fishing trawl net being dragged through it or by undersea drilling and few would ever know it existed.
Naturalist John Muir once said, "“When one tugs at a single thing in nature, he finds it attached to the rest of the world” and throughout my career of exploring our planet and especially the oceans I have found this to be true - everything is connected and every creature matters. I believe we must see ourselves not apart or above nature, but very much connected to it.
@thephotosociety @natgeocreative
#NikonLove #national #geographic #photooftheday #cortes #banks #seal


213

Photo by @BrianSkerry.

A short-tailed stingray glides through an underwater canyon, illuminated from above by the warm tropical sun. Short-tailed stingrays are found primarily in deep waters off the coast of Southern Africa, as well as in shallow intertidal zones near the shores of Australia and New Zealand. These animals can grow to roughly 7 feet across and can reach weights of 770 pounds. Despite fears associated with stingrays, these animals typically feed on small fish and invertebrates, and are curious and unaggressive in their interactions with humans.

To learn more about these often-misunderstood creatures, follow me, @BrianSkerry on Instagram.
#short #tailed #stingray #sting #ray #oceans #new #zealand #australia #south #africa #nationalgeographic #nat #geo #NikonAmbassador #NikonLove #NikonNoFilter #photooftheday


130

Photo by @BrianSkerry.
My image of dusky dolphins is among the travel-inspired signed prints available as part of the @natgeocreative Flash Sale. These prints are on sale for $100, available this week only. Click on the link in my profile to see all of the signed prints featured, and be sure to pick one up while they're still available.


85

Photo by @BrianSkerry.
A whale shark glides among a school of fish in the turquoise waters off the coast of Mexico. Whale sharks are currently listed as ‘vulnerable’ due to human pollution and hunting, and populations remain unstable due to the slow reproductive habits of these magnificent creatures. These creatures are the largest fish in the sea, weighing over 20 tons and reaching lengths of over 40 feet long.

@thephotosociety @natgeocreative

#whale #shark #vulnerable #conservation #fish #surprise #prey #food #mexico #photooftheday #conservation #cute #animals #preservation #natgeo #photography #underwaterphotography #underwaterphoto #follow #wanderlust

Mexico
233

Photo by @BrianSkerry.
A Loggerhead Turtle hatchling feeds amongst Sargasso weeds off the coast of Florida. Loggerheads are currently listed as an endangered species, with their populations dwindling as a result of fishing, trawling, and oceanic pollution. Often times, Loggerhead turtles mistake floating plastics for jellyfish, ingesting the debris and endangering these adorable animals. These magnificent creatures can live to be over 65 years old.

@thephotosociety @natgeocreative

#turtle #cute #climate #change #loggerhead #florida #underwater #photography #photooftheday #conservation #cute #animals #food #natgeo #NikonAmbassador #NikonLove #NikonNoFilter


138

Photo by @BrianSkerry.

Close-up view of a Mako Shark in the waters off of New Zealand. Makos are one of the fastest fish in the sea, capable of speed bursts of up to 60mph. Of all shark species, they also have one of the largest brains, relative to body size.
Makos are an endothermic shark, meaning that they can generate heat within their bodies. This adaptation allows them to swim into cooler waters to feed on oily fish, giving them great strength and fueling their powerful muscles.
The numbers of Makos have declined worldwide due to overfishing and the increasing global demand for shark fins. They are currently listed as vulnerable by the IUCN.
Learn more about Mako Sharks from the feature story about these impressive animals in the August issue of National Geographic Magazine, @NatGeo.

And if you like sharks, or simply find these creatures fascinatinh check, out the new book - SHARK - by @BrianSkerry and @NatGeo! Available at the link in my bio or wherever books are sold.

New Zealand
293

Video by @BrianSkerry.

A Shortfin Mako Shark attacks a mullet bait, towed by a fisherman in the waters of New Zealand. Makos are one of the fastest animals in the sea, capable of swimming at speeds of over 45 mph.
Sport fishermen frequently use a mullet bait - towed at speeds of nearly 10 knots - to try and catch marlin, but Mako Sharks often attack the bait instead.
Photographer Brian Skerry (@BrianSkerry) built a special tow camera and used a high-speed video system to capture this astounding behavior in slow motion.

Learn more about these amazing animals in the August issue of National Geographic Magazine (@NatGeo), with a story featuring my photographs.
Also be sure to check out the new book - SHARK - by @BrianSkerry and @NatGeo, available at the link in my bio or wherever books are sold!

#shark #mako #follow #onassignment #nationalgeographic #natgeo #photographer #photography #underwaterphoto #makoshark #newzealand #nz #pacific #fishing #travelphoto #travel #photooftheday #conservation #preservation


120

Photo by @BrianSkerry.

A Mako Shark cruises through the blue waves of San Diego, CA; its dorsal fin not even breaking the surface.
Makos are one of the fastest fish in the sea, capable of speed bursts of up to 60 mph. Of all shark species, they also have one of the largest brains, relative to body size.
The numbers of Makos have declined worldwide due to overfishing and the increasing global demand for shark fins. They are currently listed as vulnerable by the IUCN.
Learn more about Mako Sharks from the feature story about these impressive animals in the August issue of National Geographic Magazine, @NatGeo.

And if you like sharks, or simply find these creatures fascinating, check out the new book - SHARK - by @BrianSkerry and @NatGeo! Available at the link in my bio or wherever books are sold.
#shark #mako #makoshark #underwater #photography #conservation #preservation #underwaterphoto #natgeo #nationalgeographic #follow #onassignment #sharks #savesharks #newzealand #nz #photooftheday #oceanambassador #nikonlove #nikonnofilter #nikonambassador

San Diego, California
74

Photo by @BrianSkerry.
A Mako Shark dives, open-mouthed, at photographer Brian Skerry (@BrianSkerry) in the waters off of New Zealand. Makos are one of the fastest fish in the sea, capable of speed bursts up to 60mph. Of all shark species they also have one of the largest brains, relative to body size.
The numbers of Makos have declined worldwide due to overfishing and the demand for shark fins. They are currently listed as vulnerable, but their population continues to spiral downwards.
Learn more about Makos in the August issue of National Geographic Magazine, @NatGeo, which includes a feature story about these impressive animals.

And if you like sharks, check out the new book - SHARK - by @BrianSkerry and @NatGeo! Available wherever books are sold.
@thephotosociety
#natgeo #sharkawarenessday #photo #makoshark #mako #shark #savesharks #underwaterphotgraphy #underwaterphoto #onassignment #photooftheday #newzealand #nz #dive #photography #nationalgeographic #follow #followme #preservation #conservation #nikonlove #nikonnofilter #nikonambassador


346

Photo by @BrianSkerry
Silhouette of an Oceanic Whitetip Shark in The Bahamas. A pelagic predator living in the open sea, the oceanic whitetip is especially efficient at hunting in these regions of ocean where finding prey can be far and few between.
Listed as the ‘most abundant large animal on Earth' as recently as the 1970s this species numbers have been reduced by 99% and are on the verge of extinction today due to over fishing and the shark fin trade. My hope is that through photography, we can begin to see these animals in a new light and understand their vital role in the health of our planet.

To see my favorite collection of shark images and read the stories of my personal experiences with these animals, check out my new book - SHARK - available wherever books are sold.
#SharkAwarenessDay #mako #makoshark #sharks #savesharks #summerofsharks #SHARKTheBook #photooftheday


175

Photo by @BrianSkerry.
A Gray Seal folds its flippers and poses for his portrait underwater in the Gulf of Maine. Extending from Cape Cod to Nova Scotia, the Gulf of Maine and its surrounding waters have been the economic bedrock of New England’s coastal communities, supporting a wide variety of commercial and recreational activities.
Unfortunately, many factors currently threaten the vitality of the Gulf of Maine ecosystem. Decades of pollution, coastal habitat destruction, overfishing and bottom trawling have yielded havoc in the form of extensive habitat loss and diminished biodiversity. We live at a pivotal moment in history, where we understand the problems and have solutions; We simply need the will to take action. Restoring health to these important resources as rapidly as possible should be a national imperative.

@thephotosociety @natgeocreative
#gulfofmaine #maine #newengland #ne #ocean #underwater #photography #nat #geo #national #geographic #protect #conserve #preserve #nature #seal #cute #animals #atlantic #photooftheday #nikonlove #nikonnofilter #nikonambassador

Gulf of Maine
538

Photo by @BrianSkerry.
A massive Tiger Shark goes nose to nose with a diver on the sand flats of the northern Bahamas. Though these sharks have often been portrayed as monsters, in reality, they are complex and valuable predators that operate to maintain a stable ecosystem.
This region of the Bahamas has been identified as a place where many pregnant female tiger sharks spend time, and it is believed that the shallow, warm water helps with gestation.
Sharks play a vital role in the health of oceanic habitats, and the removal of these predators would contribute to the collapse - like a house of cards - of the whole ecosystem. Despite this fact, more than 100 million sharks are killed each year, primarily for their fins (which are used in shark fin soup). In the last sixty years, we have lost a majority of shark populations thereby decreasing the health of our oceans.
My new book - ‘SHARK’ by @BrianSkerry - is currently on sale! Filled with photos and stories of my personal experiences from nearly 4 decades of photographing sharks, the book aims to give creatures such as the Tiger Shark a new reputation. We must see sharks as magnificent animals that are vital to the health of the ocean and, as a result, to the health of our planet.

SHARK is available wherever books are sold

@thephotosociety @natgeocreative

#tiger #shark #tigershark #bahamas #diver #underwater #photography #scuba #photo #tropical #bahamas #caribbean #natgeo #onassignment #photooftheday #SHARK #nikonambassador #nikonnofilter #nikonlove

The Bahamas
505

Photo by @BrianSkerry.
A pair of Spotted Dolphins play above the sandy ocean floor in the tropical waters off of The Bahamas.
After humans, dolphins have the largest brains in the animal kingdom, relative to body size. Through the games that they play with one another and through the means by which these dolphins socialize, researchers are able to measure their cognitive abilities. In fact, dolphins have been described as ‘an alien intelligence on Earth.’ In the years ahead, perhaps we will unlock the answers to the mysteries surrounding the complex lives of these animals, maybe even learning to communicate with one another at some point.
To see more underwater photography, and to learn more about my adventures as a National Geographic photographer, follow me on Instagram @BrianSkerry.
#spotted #dolphin #bahamas #photography #natgeo #nationalgeographic #underwater #nature #conservation #preservation #photooftheday #onassignment #nikonnofilter #nikonambassador #nikonlove

The Bahamas
89

Photo by @BrianSkerry.

An Oceanic Whitetip Shark is escorted by a trio of pilotfish in the waters off of The Bahamas. Once the most abundant large animal on Earth - large being defined as more than 100 pounds - the Oceanic Whitetip’s stocks have dropped over 98%, with the species now on the verge of extinction. These magnificent creatures have been hunted largely for their fins, which are used in shark fin soup.
TODAY, the new book - ‘SHARK’ by @BrianSkerry - will be released! Filled with photos and Brian’s personal experiences from nearly 4 decades photographing sharks, the book aims to give these amazing animals a makeover. We must see sharks as magnificent animals that are vital to the health of the ocean and, as a result, to the health of our planet.

SHARK is available wherever books are sold.

#SHARK #NatGeoFest #underwaterphotography #bahamas #photography #natgeo #nationalgeographic #sharks #savesharks #nature #underwater #caribbean #oceanic #whitetip #photooftheday #conservation #preservation #onassignment #book


165

Photo by @BrianSkerry.

Happy World Oceans Day!

On this day - when the world celebrates the magnificence of Earth’s oceans - I urge you to think about the need for conservation of our water planet.

Approximately 98% of Earth’s biosphere - where life can exist on the planet - is ocean, and yet only about 3% is protected. Science tells us that, for a healthy planet, at least 30% of the oceans must be protected. We have a lot more work to do.

Every other breath we takes comes from the sea, with more than 50% of the oxygen needed to survive generated by the ocean. If for no other reason than our own survival, ocean ecosystems must be conserved.

The oceans give us so many riches, and taking care of the sea means a healthy future for all.

Today, I will be speaking to world leaders at the General Assembly of the United Nations about the need to protect our water planet. I hope you join me in pushing for greater protection of our seas.

#worldoceansday #conservation #preservation #un #unitednations #ocean #oceans #climatechange #protect #sea #photooftheday #onassignment #natgeo #nationalgeographic #nikonlove #nikonambassador #nikonnofilter


234

Photo by @BrianSkerry.
A large Tiger Shark swims alongside a diver in the Bahamas. With the Tiger Shark once considered the most dangerous shark species in tropical waters, researchers are just now beginning to understand behaviors that were once a mystery.
Despite being large predators, life in the ocean is difficult, and these creatures face many challenges in order to survive. As with all species of shark, the Tiger Shark faces declining populations worldwide due to the continued demand for shark fins. Photographed on assignment for @NatGeo Magazine.

This photo appears on the back cover of my new book - entitled ‘SHARK’ - which will be available on June 13th wherever books are sold. This book is filled with photos of sharks, and it chronicles my personal journey of photographing sharks worldwide over the past 40 years.

#shark #sharks #bahamas #tropics #caribbean #tigershark #predator #underwater #photography #natgeo #nationalgeographic #conservation #preservation #savesharks #photooftheday #nikonlove #nikonnofilter #nikonambassador #onsale #book #new

The Bahamas
279

Photo by @BrianSkerry.
A pod of Dusky Dolphins swim through the chilly, algae-thick waters of Golfo Nuevo in Argentina. A strikingly-colored species, Dusky’s can be found in pods numbering in the hundreds.

These acrobatic creatures often leap high out of the water, and - while in the sea - use communication to corral schools of anchovies as a means of feeding.

After humans, dolphins have the largest brains in the animal kingdom, relative to body size. Despite this fact, their world is very different than our own and the ways in which they use their brain is fascinating. Dolphins see much of their world acoustically, using echolocation (i.e. sonar) to determine the location of objects and distances. Dolphins also sleep with one half of their brains awake, as they need to be constantly alert for predators and because they are voluntary breathers. 
#dusky #dolphins #dolphin #underwater #photography #nature #natgeo #nationalgeographic #argentina #golfonuevo #onassignment #photooftheday #preservation #conservation #nikonlove #nikonnofilter #nikonambassador


164

Photo by @BrianSkerry.
A pair of Unicorn Fish swim together at dusk along a deep drop-off in the waters off of Millennium Atoll, in the Southern Line Islands. Scientists on a National Geographic expedition to these remote Islands discovered a predator-heavy biomass in the reef ecosystems, with a coral cover of up to 100% in most locations.
Though currently healthy, the ecosystem must maintain every living creature as a means of surviving. Herbivores like these surgeonfish graze on algae, keeping it from overgrowing the coral. Like a finely-made watch, each piece of the ecosystem works in harmony with all other components. When certain species are removed, the entire system breaks down.

#southernlineislands #southern #line #islands #pristene #seas #national #geographic #underwater #photography #reef #coral #coralreef #photooftheday #protect #preserve #conserve #unicornfish #unicorn #nikonlove #nikonnofilter #nikonambassador


120

Photo by @BrianSkerry.

Thrilled to reveal the cover of my new book, SHARK, releasing on June 13th!

I will be presenting a lecture on May 23rd at National Geographic Headquarters (@NatGeo) in Washington, DC to celebrate the opening of my new photo exhibit at the National Geographic Museum entitled ’Sharks - On Assignment With Brian Skerry.' Please see the link in my profile for more info.
Because this is a special event, I am also offering my friends & followers a special offer - Use the code ‘Sharks15' for a 15% discount on tickets!
Although the book is not available until June 13th, copies will be available at this special lecture event and I will be doing a booking signing after the show.

Hope to see you next week!

#NatGeoLive #nationalgeographic #onassignment #washingtondc #sharks #dc #shark #savesharks #photography #photobook


195

Photo by @BrianSkerry.

An Orca attacks a Southern Sea Lion pup on the beach in Punta Norte, Argentina. Many dolphins have developed special feeding strategies to catch prey; techniques that evolve to suite the unique locations in which these animals live. The family of the orca pictured here, living off the coast of Patagonia, has developed a feeding strategy that includes beaching as a means of grabbing sea lion pups from the surf. The orca’s timing must be perfect, and these creatures must carefully select the location in which they will attack.
Photographed on assignment for @NatGeo Magazine.
#orca #southern #sea #lion #sealion #pup #punta #norte #argentina #killer #whale #species #dolphin #underwater #photography #national #geographic #nature #onassignment #photooftheday #nikonnofilter #nikonambassador #nikonlove

Punta Norte
102

Photo by @BrianSkerry.

A wild bottlenose dolphin plays with a diver in the green waters off the western coast of Ireland. After humans, dolphins have the largest brains in the animal kingdom, relative to body size. Despite this fact, their world is very different than our own and the ways in which they use their brain is fascinating. Dolphins see much of their world acoustically, using echolocation (i.e. sonar) to determine the location of objects and distances. Dolphins also sleep with one half of their brains awake, as they need to be constantly alert for predators and because they are voluntary breathers.

In several locations around the world, dolphins have established residency, and frequently interact with humans.

Photographed on assignment for @NatGeo Magazine.

#wild #bottlenose #dolphin #bottlenosedolphin #stpatricksday #stpattysday #stpatty #stpatrick #ireland #green #underwater #photography #national #geographic #natgeo #photooftheday #onassignment #nikonlove #nikonnofilter #nikonambassador


142

Photo by @BrianSkerry.

Portrait of a Unicorn Fish, a type of surgeonfish, in the waters off Millennium Atoll in the Southern Line Islands. Scientists on a National Geographic expedition to these remote Islands discovered a predator-heavy biomass in the reef ecosystems, with a coral cover of up to 100% in most locations.
Though currently healthy, the ecosystem must maintain every living creature as a means of surviving. Herbivores like these surgeonfish graze on algae, keeping it from overgrowing the coral. Like a finely-made watch, each piece of the ecosystem works in harmony with all other components. When certain species are removed, the entire system breaks down.

#southernlineislands #southern #line #islands #pristene #seas #national #geographic #underwater #photography #reef #coral #coralreef #photooftheday #protect #preserve #conserve #nikonnofilter #nikonambassador #nikonlove


139

Photo by @BrianSkerry.
A large pod of spinner dolphins swim in the clear blue water off of Oahu, Hawaii. These animals hunt in the deep offshore waters at night, before returning to shallower coastal regions in the morning to socialize and rest.
Spinner dolphins are among the most social of all dolphin species and are rarely seen alone or even in small groups.
After humans, dolphins have the largest brains in the animal kingdom, relative to body size. Despite this fact, their world is very different than our own and the ways in which they use their brain is fascinating. Dolphins see much of their world acoustically, using echolocation (i.e. sonar) to determine the location of objects and distances. Dolphins also sleep with one half of their brains awake, as they need to be constantly alert for predators and because they are voluntary breathers.

@ThePhotoSociety @natgeocreative
#spinner #dolphin #dolphins #ocean #underwater #photography #nationalgeographic #natgeo #travel #hawaii #oahu #water #tropical #animals #photooftheday #onassignment #nikonlove #nikonambassador #nikonnofilter

Oahu
127

Photo by @BrianSkerry.

A Shortfin Mako Shark cruises in the offshore waters of Southern California, as parasitic Copepods stream from the shark’s dorsal fin.

An efficient ocean predator, Makos are one of the fastest fish in the sea, capable of bursts of up to 60 miles per hour. Along with their incredible speed, they also have one of the largest brains of any shark, relative to body size. The number of Makos has declined worldwide due to overfishing and the demand for shark fins and, as a result, the species is currently listed as vulnerable.
Every year, more than 100 million sharks are killed, primarily for their fins (which are used in shark fin soup). In the last sixty years, we have lost a majority of shark populations thereby decreasing the health of our oceans.
Coverage from my upcoming story in @NatGeo Magazine.
#mako #shark #southerncalifornia #socal #california #cali #sharks #savesharks #onassignment #natgeo #nationalgeographic #onassignment #follow #underwaterphotography #photography #nature #photooftheday #nikonlove #nikonnofilter #nikonambassador


143