#fightingextinction

Instagram photos and videos

#fightingextinction#conservation#conserving#nopoaching#amurtiger#notrade#tiger#zookeeper#russia#marwellzoo#extincteur#speciesextinction#tranformersageofextinction#northamerica#dopps#owls#iucn#birdsofinstagram#zoo#beautiful#owlstagram_feature#marwellwildlife#enclosure#uk#chicken#birdsofprey#owl#education

Hashtags #fightingextinction for Instagram

Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid of The Matthews (or Mathews) Range, also known as the Lenkiyio Hills, northern Kenya - the area is isolated, and holds forests of juniper and cycads. It is home to elephants and other large mammals, and was one of the last places in northern Kenya to have wild Black Rhinos. The last Black Rhino in the Mathew's was poached out in the 1990s. The Mathew's are also home to the Samburu people. The mountain range is a sky island, surrounded by plains, with Ndoto Mountains to the north and the Karisia hills to the west. Sky islands are isolated mountains surrounded by radically different lowland environments. Such isolation has significant implications for these natural habitats. A number of the species in the Mathew's have evolved independently and the diversity of the high altitude forest is of great conservation value - I’ll be working in this incredible part of the world for the next few weeks #conserving #conservation #kenya #northernkenya #samburu #nopoaching #lion #withbutterfliesandwarriors @ewasolions @everydayextinction #fightingextinction


0

Young Seth, #fightingextinction, playing with a #rainbowboa that I think @dolphinjeff found at @sachalodge circa 2005.

Sacha Lodge
10

One of my faves. Yellowstone’s first snow day of ‘17. ❄️🦌

Yellowstone National Park
7

I never heard of these animals till I seen @panamaruyami post about extinct animals.


8

Repost from @everydayextinction using @RepostRegramApp - Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid - Amur tiger, Russia’s Far East - Russia’s Far East is home to 95 percent of the global population of Amur tigers; I was lucky enough to work there in 2005. A census that year showed that there were between 423 to 502 individuals. A decade later, according to an interim survey released by the russian government, the population had increased to 540 individuals. Recent anti-poaching efforts have been integral to the rise in tiger numbers, with tougher punishments and the introduction of criminal charges for the illegal hunting, storage and trafficking of endangered animals and their parts. Poaching is the greatest threat to wild tigers today with tiger parts still in high demand throughout Asia. In the 1940s, the population of Amur tigers fell to just 40 animals, but the population was brought back from the brink through conservation efforts and a ban on tiger hunting. Interestingly, and worryingly, a broad genetic sampling of 95 wild Russian tigers found markedly low genetic diversity, with the effective population size extraordinarily low in comparison to the census population size; with the population behaving as if it were just 27–35 individuals. This reflects the recent population crash of the 1940s and correlated to low documented cub survivorship to independence in the Russian Far East, and the fact that more than 90% of the population occurs in the Sikhote Alin mountain region, and there is little genetic exchange (movement of Tigers) across the development corridor which separates this sub-population from the much smaller subpopulation found in southwest Primorye province. This low genetic diversity is becoming an increasing problem across a multitude of species as populations crash, and are then brought back from the brink of extinction. To see more of my work and projects follow me here @chancellordavid @natgeo and @thephotosociety @everydayextinction #fightingextinction #tiger #amurtiger #russia #nopoaching #notrade #conserving


0

Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid - Amur tiger, Russia’s Far East - Russia’s Far East is home to 95 percent of the global population of Amur tigers; I was lucky enough to work there in 2005. A census that year showed that there were between 423 to 502 individuals. A decade later, according to an interim survey released by the russian government, the population had increased to 540 individuals. Recent anti-poaching efforts have been integral to the rise in tiger numbers, with tougher punishments and the introduction of criminal charges for the illegal hunting, storage and trafficking of endangered animals and their parts. Poaching is the greatest threat to wild tigers today with tiger parts still in high demand throughout Asia. In the 1940s, the population of Amur tigers fell to just 40 animals, but the population was brought back from the brink through conservation efforts and a ban on tiger hunting. Interestingly, and worryingly, a broad genetic sampling of 95 wild Russian tigers found markedly low genetic diversity, with the effective population size extraordinarily low in comparison to the census population size; with the population behaving as if it were just 27–35 individuals. This reflects the recent population crash of the 1940s and correlated to low documented cub survivorship to independence in the Russian Far East, and the fact that more than 90% of the population occurs in the Sikhote Alin mountain region, and there is little genetic exchange (movement of Tigers) across the development corridor which separates this sub-population from the much smaller subpopulation found in southwest Primorye province. This low genetic diversity is becoming an increasing problem across a multitude of species as populations crash, and are then brought back from the brink of extinction. To see more of my work and projects follow me here @chancellordavid @natgeo and @thephotosociety @everydayextinction #fightingextinction #tiger #amurtiger #russia #nopoaching #notrade #conserving


4

Melbourne Zoo's beautiful animals 😍
I took myself on a day trip today and met up with some cheeky and wonderful primates! But how can you resist the other spectacular animals there, especially when they pose for photos! 🐾😄
@melbourne_zoo #primates #lions #zoooutings #photography #conservation #fightingextinction #zoosvic #purebeauty #zoologist #conservationecologist #encounter #followmeformoresnaps @wonderfulworld_photography


1

Bilbies, boodies, numbats and quenda are just some of the small mammals in WA that need our help to survive in the wild.
Thanks to control of feral cats and foxes in places like #Dryandra Woodlands, they have a fighting chance in the pockets of suitable habitat that remain.

Open landscape management and feral cat free areas are two of the methods targeted in the #ThreatenedSpecies Strategy and both are being used to good affect here. A new 1000ha fenced area will act as an insurance against predation, while trapping and baiting in the broader landscape prevent a localised extinction.

In partnership with Parks and Wildlife, Western Australia and groups like Numbat Task Force and Project Numbat we continue to support on ground action to protect our precious plants and animals. #savingspecies #FightingExtinction #mammalsofinstagram #numbat #mammalwatching


1

Loading...