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Photo by @toddler777
Catching some air along the California coast. 🤙 #WHPplay


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Photograph by David Chancellor @chancellordavid - barn owl chick, Invermark, Cairngorm National Park, Scotland- on our rounds today we found this little guy had fallen out of one of the nest boxes, he’s now back with his 5 siblings. I’ll be watching them grow and then fledge over coming weeks. You can just see the characteristic heart shaped face, and the flight feathers underneath the fluffy down which helps them keep warm, and therefore allows the female to leave the nest and help the male with hunting duties. The barn owl is nocturnal over most of its range, but in Britain and some Pacific islands, it also hunts by day. Barn owls specialise in hunting animals on the ground and nearly all of their food consists of small mammals which they locate by sound. They mate for life unless one of the pair is killed, when a new pair bond may be formed. Breeding takes place at varying times of year according to locality, with a clutch, averaging about four eggs, being laid in a nest in a hollow tree, old building or fissure in a cliff. Most bird species don’t start to incubate their eggs until the clutch is complete, so the eggs hatch at more or less the same time. But Barn Owls begin incubation as soon as the first egg is laid and lay additional eggs over a period of around 8-21 days. After 31-32 days’ incubation, the eggs hatch every 2-3 days, usually in the order they were laid. This is termed “asynchronous” hatching. The age difference between the oldest and youngest nestlings can be as much as three weeks. This age variation serves to reduce the peak in food demand and spread it over a longer period. The female does all the incubation and the male provides all the food until the young are around 3 weeks old which is roughly the age of this owlet. Barn owls do not strictly speaking build a nest but rather lay their eggs onto the previous years nest debris, a compacted layer of owl pellets, having nest boxes distributed around the Estate always the owls to return the same site and the estate is therefore more easily able to monitor the health of populations - To see more from this wild and wonderful landscape follow me here @chancellordavid @thephotosociety


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Holding the Tracks | Photograph by Kyle Miller (@wyoming_hotshots)
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“Firefighters work to control the 416 Fire burning on the San Juan National Forest near Durango, Colorado. Pictured here, a member of the Wyoming Hotshots is monitoring the unburned or ‘green’ side of the fireline,” writes #YourShotPhotographer Kyle Miller. “Firefighters often use natural fuel to set back fires, and here the railroad tracks work nicely for them to burn off from. A few people are at the front, while the rest of the crew holds the line, making sure no adverse winds throw hot embers across onto the green side.”

“Kyle, thank you so much for sharing this series. I love learning about the lives and careers of these firefighters. I love how you composed this image, to show the destruction of the fire on the left and contrasting with the lush, untouched green on the right. I’m looking forward to learning more through your story-telling images. Well done.” — @natgeoyourshot Associate Photo Editor Kristen McNicholas (@kemnicholas). Check out our Instagram Story to see more of Kristen’s favorites from last week.


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@chadcarroll Success is not final; failure is not fatal: It is the courage to continue that counts. Check out @chadcarroll to see more on this spectacular property in Florida www.RegaliaMiami.com


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Have the courage to follow your heart


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Brasserie à Paris ☕️ 🚬


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110°F/43°C🔥🔥🔥#PalmCanyons


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Photo of @bertiegregory by @spono. Behind the scenes on a new series for National Geographic at St Andrews Bay, South Georgia Island. This bay has got to be one of the most incredible places on the planet. Argued to be the busiest beach in the world, it’s home to over 400,000 king penguins. It’s hard to believe that in 1925, just 1,100 kings were counted here. This is what happens when environmental conditions are right and you protect a place. Hats off to the South Georgia Government and all the awesome NGOs that have contributed to this success story. After we sat down quietly at the edge of the colony, these curious brown chicks came over for a closer look at the camera! Follow @bertiegregory and @spono for more wildlife adventures.


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SENIOR SUNDAY! @susiesseniordogs thinks five years is five too many. Jake and Jill went up the hill...looking for their forever home! These two cuties are a bonded brother and sister pair who have been at the shelter for the last 5 years. Yes, you read that right: FIVE years at the shelter. They are both friendly with other dogs and gentle with children. They both love human attention, head scratches and belly rubs! The only reason they haven't been adopted in so long is due to so many dogs needing homes. Jake and Jill are inseparable and looking for their one special-someone who understands the connection that some animals have with each other and will adopt them both together.

@bornfreepetshelter wrote, "Jill and Jake are medium sized dogs who were adopted out from our shelter as puppies. However, after 5 years their owner became ill and was no longer able to keep them. And they were returned them to our shelter. Jake and Jill have been in the shelter another 5 years. They are now 10 years old. Jake is 39 pounds and Jill is 49 pounds. They are not very big, just chubby.

Jake and Jill haven't received any interest at all. It's very sad to hear, they are so sweet and loving. It's really hard for us to find people who want to adopt older dogs. They are both are even-tempered, friendly, laid back and sweet dogs. Jill is the outgoing one of the two, Jake is more calm but also very sweet. They are both very good with other dogs and kids. These two are such a great pair. They are super well mannered and well behaved that you will be happy to have them around. They are brother/sister and it would be great if they were adopted together.
Jill needs to lose a lot of weight and once she does she will be able to walk better. Other than that, Jake and Jill are both healthy." To adopt Jake and Jill, please email bornfreepetshelter@gmail.com to apply!
@bornfreepetshelter is located in Homestead, FL.a


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