Photo by @geoffreyberliner for @penumbrafoundation
“The greatest artists, the most eternal artists, the ones that really have longevity, are the ones that were dedicated and devoted to their work and gave parts of themselves,” says Geoffrey Berliner, executive director of the nonprofit Penumbra Foundation (@penumbrafoundation). “Great art stems from great tension and great investigation and great suffrage and great living.” The New York City organization is on a mission to bring together the art and science of photography through programs and workshops for aspiring and veteran photographers, alike.
In the digital age of point, click, delete, repeat, he believes it’s more important than ever to preserve and explore archaic formats like tintype, one of the earliest (and most complicated) photo processes made popular in the 1860s, as a means to develop voice and creative literacy in the next generation’s great artists. Great art, Geoffrey believes, starts with story: “When you teach a kid comprehensive storytelling, that one kid can go forth and create work that can make a huge impact in the world.”
Watch our Instagram story to see Geoffrey and other artists in Brooklyn at Photoville, a pop-up village of shipping containers featuring photo exhibitions from all over the world.

Instagram

Photo by @geoffreyberliner for @penumbrafoundation “The greatest artists, the most eternal artists, the ones that really have longevity, are the ones that were dedicated and devoted to their work and gave parts of themselves,” says Geoffrey Berliner, executive director of the nonprofit Penumbra Foundation (@penumbrafoundation). “Great art stems from great tension and great investigation and great suffrage and great living.” The New York City organization is on a mission to bring together the art and science of photography through programs and workshops for aspiring and veteran photographers, alike. In the digital age of point, click, delete, repeat, he believes it’s more important than ever to preserve and explore archaic formats like tintype, one of the earliest (and most complicated) photo processes made popular in the 1860s, as a means to develop voice and creative literacy in the next generation’s great artists. Great art, Geoffrey believes, starts with story: “When you teach a kid comprehensive storytelling, that one kid can go forth and create work that can make a huge impact in the world.” Watch our Instagram story to see Geoffrey and other artists in Brooklyn at Photoville, a pop-up village of shipping containers featuring photo exhibitions from all over the world.

New York, New York normal

621,951

6,197

Si pelukis gagal🔵

Mirip alm. Suzanna ?? Bener gak si......????

🌍Śhâíķh Úîf🌎

😍😍😍😍😍

hayati

nice :)

melik

Salam

Marisela Buena

Hermosisima

The end of the page