National Geographic

Photo by @davidliittschwager. Swipe left to see developmental stages of Moon Jellies, genus Aurelia. Pictured are ephyrae (larval jellyfish) that are 1 day, 4 days, and 12 days old, followed by a 16 days old medusa and finally an adult medusa. For all but the last picture of the adult, the frame size is only 1/3 of an inch high -- about the size of a small adult index fingernail. Photographed on assignment for National Geographic magazine at the Kamo Aquarium in Japan. Posted from the field. @natgeocreative @thephotosociety #onassignment

155,174 鶴岡市立加茂水族館

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@luxtravelerlife

😍😍😍😍😍 wow love it!

@goofass23

You really doing it 💪 #TOTHETOP

@david_maillard

very cool ;)

@anacasany

@emilio_ar21 estoy enfadada porque no hay emoticonos de medusas

@anacasany

ostras como molaaa! @emilio_ar21 🙊

@benowmehere

OMG!!! 💕💕💕💕

@ali.pamuk

This is ıncredible !!

@trapenellen

Science at its Best!!!!

@brendandowdphoto

Crazy photo set they look great

@cdavidrodriguez

damnn mira q cabrooon

@tonynera

Lovely

@parscart

natgeo برای دیدن مدل لباس های جدید 97 و 2018 به پیج ما سر بزنید

@shawnk4011

Amazing!

@ac_tafoya

Omg hahahhha only out inside joke was priceless of ephyrae @camidesilva

@camidesilva

@ac_tafoya hey which stage is this? 😜

@starsrissa

Ckout @21champloo these are really tiny

@banglesshouldjangle

The National Geographic photographs constantly have me wonder-struck by the glorious life that is on this planet... Without them, many people wouldn't have any experience of such animals. I always feel so privileged.

@ver_romero

Cool !!!!

@sofigdlr

@netochapa veeee es el desarrollo de la medusaa ❤️💕😍

@bigphilly92

Some people are probably like, “I thought Medusa turned you to stone” 🤣

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