Vogue

The tendency toward the bohemian in Danish dress can be (partly) explained by Shakespeare, who in 1603 published Hamlet, a story about a Danish prince and his lady love Ophelia, who, despite coming to a tragic and watery end, became a paradigm of romanticism—and archetypal Danish beauty. In paintings by Pre-Raphaelites John William Waterhouse and John Everett Millais, Ophelia is depicted as a long-haired beauty who wears flowers in her hair and a long flowing dress, both outward expressions of her free-spiritedness and femininity. Tap the link in our bio to learn more about how she served as muse at Copenhagen Fashion Week. #regram @rockpaperdresses

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The tendency toward the bohemian in Danish dress can be (partly) explained by Shakespeare, who in 1603 published Hamlet, a story about a Danish prince and his lady love Ophelia, who, despite coming to a tragic and watery end, became a paradigm of romanticism—and archetypal Danish beauty. In paintings by Pre-Raphaelites John William Waterhouse and John Everett Millais, Ophelia is depicted as a long-haired beauty who wears flowers in her hair and a long flowing dress, both outward expressions of her free-spiritedness and femininity. Tap the link in our bio to learn more about how she served as muse at Copenhagen Fashion Week. #regram @rockpaperdresses

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Rosaleigh

The one on the far right 💛 @tasha.e.s

metAllina

Gorgeous!!!great work💞💞💞💞💞💞💞

Peter Ndungu

Beautiful!

Ruma B

Everything about this picture is goals

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