#CenterforBiodiv

Instagram photos and videos

#Monarch_Watch#CenterforBiodiv#Monarch#Endangered#Butterfly#Migration#Repost#centerforbiodiv#impeach#buildingthewallisslavery#NoGrizHunt#freedom#wonder#leonardodicaprio#nature#impeachtrump#fake#fakenews#mexico#thewall#defendersofwildlife#usa#wolfs#endangered#pantheramexico#trump#rasist#whitehouse#clown

Hashtags #CenterforBiodiv for Instagram

Make sure to register to participate and/or volunteer for our event this Saturday @fgcu North Lake Village!! For your convenience, the link's in our bio so go check it out!! All proceeds will be donated to the Center for Biological Diversity 🐺🐬🦅 Can't make it this Saturday? You can still support us by donating to our gofundme page!
#fgcu #fgcut4t #trailsfortails #centerforbiologicaldiversity #centerforbiodiv @centerforbiodiv


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Lynx Rufus: Bobcats can run up to 30 miles an hour. They live between 5 & 15 years. They're often mixed up with the lynx. It is important to the Sonoran Desert because it keeps the rabbit population under control. #ScienceProject #centerforbiodiv


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@cristina_la_tina @centerforbiodiv @trump @whitehouse @potus @vp @flotus @pantheramexico @wwf
Courtesy Defenders of Wildlife

While wolves have rebounded from near-total extinction in parts of the Northern Rockies and Western Great Lakes regions, much of the suitable habitat remains unoccupied by wolves.

Defenders advocates for the restoration of wolf populations in appropriate suitable habitat (slanted red lines) that still exists for gray wolves in parts of Arizona,
New Mexico, western Texas, Mexico, northern California, Oregon, Washington, Colorado, Utah, Maine and New York, and for red wolves in parts of the
Southeast. No matter how ideal the habitat, however it is ultimately up to people to determine if wolves will be allowed to survive in any given area.
Note: The suitable habitat for wolves designated on the map is an approximation based on peer-reviewed studies, expert opinion of our staff and habitat modeling, a complex science
that involves superimposing multiple factors such as wolf range and dispersal routes, road density and usage, vegetation types, prey density, presence of livestock, development,
slope and elevation.
@defendersofwildlife
http://www.endangered.org/wolf-delisting/
#centerforbiodiv #defendersofwildlife #pantheramexico #wolfs #endangered #thewall #trump #rasist #impeach #whitehouse #clown #usa #mexico #freedom #fake #fakenews #buildingthewallisslavery #impeachtrump


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#Repost @natgeotravel
・・・
Photo by @FransLanting Basking in the sun with wings spread like miniature solar panels, Monarch butterflies cover a pine tree in the mountains of Mexico where they overwinter. How these travellers find their way to that one place in Michoacan that has the right conditions they need remains a mystery. When I first went there to document them I was astonished by the sights of many millions of Monarchs turning an entire forest orange, but their numbers have since plummeted by 90%. Check @FransLanting to see images of the epic phenomenon that I was able to capture then. @ChristineEckstrom @ThePhotoSociety @XercesSociety #Butterfly #Monarch #Endangered #CenterforBiodiv #Monarch_Watch #Migration


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Photos by @FransLanting As frail as they are, Monarch butterflies are powerful symbols for the vibrant connections between Mexico, the US and Canada. They spend their summers in the US where they reproduce, but they need Mexico’s mountains to overwinter and as global warming progresses, they will need Canada as an extension of their range. At a time when some think borders need walls to become barriers, Monarchs flutter back and forth at will and unite a continent. Monarchs cannot be claimed by a single country, but we all have a stake in their future. Unsustainable logging in Mexico’s mountains deprives Monarchs of critical habitat. The industrial use of pesticides in the US has dramatically reduced their numbers and that deprives people in Mexico—and everywhere else—of a natural wonder that has no equal on earth. Monarchs can only thrive when people unite to protect them. Check @FransLanting for more images of their astonishing gatherings in Mexico and see what happens when a snowstorm brings millions down to the ground. @ChristineEckstrom @XercesSociety #Butterfly #Monarch #Endangered #CenterforBiodiv #Monarch_Watch #Migration


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Please sign on to Center for Biological Diversity's public comments to stop the Wyoming trophy hunt of Yellowstone grizzly bears. #WhatsWrongWithWY #NoGrizHunt

https://act.biologicaldiversity.org/onlineactions/1LaywZg8akqG3B0DFy3jTw2?&sourceID=1004352&utm_source=ad&utm_medium=website&utm_campaign=currentalerts

#NoGrizHunt #BanTrophyHunting #ThatsWY #FindYourPark #WyomingTourism #NoGrizzlyHunting #TrophyHunting #GrizzlyBears #Yellowstone #GrandTetons #IdahoTourism #Idaho #CenterforBioDiv


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#Repost @natgeo with @get_repost
・・・
Photo by @FransLanting As frail as they are, Monarch butterflies are powerful symbols for the vibrant connections between Mexico, the US and Canada. They spend their summers in the US where they reproduce, but they need Mexico’s mountains to overwinter and as global warming progresses, they will need Canada as an extension of their range. At a time when some think borders need walls to become barriers, Monarchs flutter back and forth at will and unite a continent. Monarchs cannot be claimed by a single country, but we all have a stake in their future. Unsustainable logging in Mexico’s mountains deprives Monarchs of critical habitat. The industrial use of pesticides in the US has dramatically reduced their numbers and that deprives people in Mexico—and everywhere else—of a natural wonder that has no equal on earth. Monarchs can only thrive when people unite to protect them. Check @FransLanting for more images of their astonishing gatherings in Mexico and see what happens when a snowstorm brings millions down to the ground. @ChristineEckstrom @ThePhotoSociety @XercesSociety #Butterfly #Monarch #Endangered #CenterforBiodiv #Monarch_Watch #Migration


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#incredible #nature #inspirationeverywhere #Repost @natgeotravel with @get_repost
・・・
Photo by @FransLanting Basking in the sun with wings spread like miniature solar panels, Monarch butterflies cover a pine tree in the mountains of Mexico where they overwinter. How these travellers find their way to that one place in Michoacan that has the right conditions they need remains a mystery. When I first went there to document them I was astonished by the sights of many millions of Monarchs turning an entire forest orange, but their numbers have since plummeted by 90%. Check @FransLanting to see images of the epic phenomenon that I was able to capture then. @ChristineEckstrom @ThePhotoSociety @XercesSociety #Butterfly #Monarch #Endangered #CenterforBiodiv #Monarch_Watch #Migration


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Photos by @FransLanting When a rare snowstorm hit the mountains in Mexico where Monarch butterflies had gathered for the winter, millions of them lost their grip and were knocked down to the ground. The entire forest floor was covered in lifeless butterflies, but after the storm passed and temperatures rose, many of them miraculously came back to life. They raised their body temperature by quivering their wings as you can see in these photos. After a while millions of trembling Monarchs were able to slowly crawl up tree trunks with wings spread like solar panels to soak up heat so they could get back to their favorite roosting spots high off the ground. It was an amazing sight, but it also confirmed how vulnerable they are—to weather and to gaps in the forest caused by illegal logging which disturbs the microclimate they need to hibernate. Go to @FransLanting to see more images of this remarkable phenomenon. @ChristineEckstrom @ThePhotoSociety @NatGeoCreative @XercesSociety #Butterfly #Monarch #Endangered #CenterforBiodiv #Monarch_Watch #Migration

#TouristIdea #vacation #travelling #holiday #destination


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#Repost @natgeo with @get_repost
・・・
Photo by @FransLanting As frail as they are, Monarch butterflies are powerful symbols for the vibrant connections between Mexico, the US and Canada. They spend their summers in the US where they reproduce, but they need Mexico’s mountains to overwinter and as global warming progresses, they will need Canada as an extension of their range. At a time when some think borders need walls to become barriers, Monarchs flutter back and forth at will and unite a continent. Monarchs cannot be claimed by a single country, but we all have a stake in their future. Unsustainable logging in Mexico’s mountains deprives Monarchs of critical habitat. The industrial use of pesticides in the US has dramatically reduced their numbers and that deprives people in Mexico—and everywhere else—of a natural wonder that has no equal on earth. Monarchs can only thrive when people unite to protect them. Check @FransLanting for more images of their astonishing gatherings in Mexico and see what happens when a snowstorm brings millions down to the ground. @ChristineEckstrom @ThePhotoSociety @XercesSociety #Butterfly #Monarch #Endangered #CenterforBiodiv #Monarch_Watch #Migration


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Photos by @FransLanting When a rare snowstorm hit the mountains in Mexico where Monarch butterflies had gathered for the winter, millions of them lost their grip and were knocked down to the ground. The entire forest floor was covered in lifeless butterflies, but after the storm passed and temperatures rose, many of them miraculously came back to life. They raised their body temperature by quivering their wings as you can see in these photos. After a while millions of trembling Monarchs were able to slowly crawl up tree trunks with wings spread like solar panels to soak up heat so they could get back to their favorite roosting spots high off the ground. It was an amazing sight, but it also confirmed how vulnerable they are—to weather and to gaps in the forest caused by illegal logging which disturbs the microclimate they need to hibernate. Go to @FransLanting to see more images of this remarkable phenomenon. @ChristineEckstrom @ThePhotoSociety @NatGeoCreative @XercesSociety #Butterfly #Monarch #Endangered #CenterforBiodiv #Monarch_Watch #Migration


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“ Photos by @FransLanting When a rare snowstorm hit the mountains in Mexico where Monarch butterflies had gathered for the winter, millions of them lost their grip and were knocked down to the ground. The entire forest floor was covered in lifeless butterflies, but after the storm passed and temperatures rose, many of them miraculously came back to life. They raised their body temperature by quivering their wings as you can see in these photos. After a while millions of trembling Monarchs were able to slowly crawl up tree trunks with wings spread like solar panels to soak up heat so they could get back to their favorite roosting spots high off the ground. It was an amazing sight, but it also confirmed how vulnerable they are—to weather and to gaps in the forest caused by illegal logging which disturbs the microclimate they need to hibernate. Stay tuned for more survival stories of the natural kind. @ThePhotoSociety @NatGeoCreative @XercesSociety #Butterfly #Monarch #Endangered #CenterforBiodiv #Monarch_Watch #Migration
#wonder #amazing
#butterfly #monarchbutterfly #nature #photography #photographer #climatechange #climatechangeisreal #cambioclimatico #greenworld #💚 #geo #planeta #biodiversidad #♻️ #biodiversity #calentamientoglobal #world #🌎 #apagalaluz #greenlife #environment #climateaction


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I suppose once you’ve been transformed from a caterpillar 🐛 into a butterfly 🦋 being raised from the dead isn’t so impossible for you either. #iseesomuchinthis #butterflies
#Repost @natgeotravel with @get_repost
・・・
Photos by @FransLanting When a rare snowstorm hit the mountains in Mexico where Monarch butterflies had gathered for the winter, millions of them lost their grip and were knocked down to the ground. The entire forest floor was covered in lifeless butterflies, but after the storm passed and temperatures rose, many of them miraculously came back to life. They raised their body temperature by quivering their wings as you can see in these photos. After a while millions of trembling Monarchs were able to slowly crawl up tree trunks with wings spread like solar panels to soak up heat so they could get back to their favorite roosting spots high off the ground. It was an amazing sight, but it also confirmed how vulnerable they are—to weather and to gaps in the forest caused by illegal logging which disturbs the microclimate they need to hibernate. Go to @FransLanting to see more images of this remarkable phenomenon. @ChristineEckstrom @ThePhotoSociety @NatGeoCreative @XercesSociety #Butterfly #Monarch #Endangered #CenterforBiodiv #Monarch_Watch #Migration


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Another miracle of nature ! #Repost @natgeotravel
Photos by @FransLanting When a rare snowstorm hit the mountains in Mexico where Monarch butterflies had gathered for the winter, millions of them lost their grip and were knocked down to the ground. The entire forest floor was covered in lifeless butterflies, but after the storm passed and temperatures rose, many of them miraculously came back to life. They raised their body temperature by quivering their wings as you can see in these photos. After a while millions of trembling Monarchs were able to slowly crawl up tree trunks with wings spread like solar panels to soak up heat so they could get back to their favorite roosting spots high off the ground. It was an amazing sight, but it also confirmed how vulnerable they are—to weather and to gaps in the forest caused by illegal logging which disturbs the microclimate they need to hibernate. Go to @FransLanting to see more images of this remarkable phenomenon. @ChristineEckstrom @ThePhotoSociety @NatGeoCreative @XercesSociety #Butterfly #Monarch #Endangered #CenterforBiodiv #Monarch_Watch #Migration


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Photos by @FransLanting When a rare snowstorm hit the mountains in Mexico where Monarch butterflies had gathered for the winter, millions of them lost their grip and were knocked down to the ground. The entire forest floor was covered in lifeless butterflies, but after the storm passed and temperatures rose, many of them miraculously came back to life. They raised their body temperature by quivering their wings as you can see in these photos. After a while millions of trembling Monarchs were able to slowly crawl up tree trunks with wings spread like solar panels to soak up heat so they could get back to their favorite roosting spots high off the ground. It was an amazing sight, but it also confirmed how vulnerable they are—to weather and to gaps in the forest caused by illegal logging which disturbs the microclimate they need to hibernate. Go to @FransLanting to see more images of this remarkable phenomenon. @ChristineEckstrom @ThePhotoSociety @NatGeoCreative @XercesSociety #Butterfly #Monarch #Endangered #CenterforBiodiv #Monarch_Watch #Migration


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regram @natgeotravel
Photo by @FransLanting Basking in the sun with wings spread like miniature solar panels, Monarch butterflies cover a pine tree in the mountains of Mexico where they overwinter. How these travellers find their way to that one place in Michoacan that has the right conditions they need remains a mystery. When I first went there to document them I was astonished by the sights of many millions of Monarchs turning an entire forest orange, but their numbers have since plummeted by 90%. Check @FransLanting to see images of the epic phenomenon that I was able to capture then. @ChristineEckstrom @ThePhotoSociety @XercesSociety #Butterfly #Monarch #Endangered #CenterforBiodiv #Monarch_Watch #Migration


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Please support (me) 💛

Photo by @FransLanting Basking in the sun with wings spread like miniature solar panels, Monarch butterflies cover a pine tree in the mountains of Mexico where they overwinter. How these travellers find their way to that one place in Michoacan that has the right conditions they need remains a mystery. When I first went there to document them I was astonished by the sights of many millions of Monarchs turning an entire forest orange, but their numbers have since plummeted by 90%. Check @FransLanting to see images of the epic phenomenon that I was able to capture then. @ChristineEckstrom @ThePhotoSociety @XercesSociety #Butterfly #Monarch #Endangered #CenterforBiodiv #Monarch_Watch #Migration


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Sharing an amazing photo of the Monarch butterflies for all of you today 🤩

#Repost @natgeotravel
• • •
Photo by @FransLanting Basking in the sun with wings spread like miniature solar panels, Monarch butterflies cover a pine tree in the mountains of Mexico where they overwinter. How these travellers find their way to that one place in Michoacan that has the right conditions they need remains a mystery. When I first went there to document them I was astonished by the sights of many millions of Monarchs turning an entire forest orange, but their numbers have since plummeted by 90%. Check @FransLanting to see images of the epic phenomenon that I was able to capture then. @ChristineEckstrom @ThePhotoSociety @XercesSociety #Butterfly #Monarch #Endangered #CenterforBiodiv #Monarch_Watch #Migration


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Just when the caterpillar thought the world had ended, she became a butterfly. |. Repost from @natgeo @TopRankRepost #TopRankRepost Photo by @FransLanting Millions of Monarch butterflies are on their way back again to the USA from wintering grounds in Mexico. It’s an epic migration. They cover thousands of miles and reproduce as they go along. They will recolonize North America from the Rocky Mountains to the Atlantic Coast. But at the end of summer, newborn Monarchs fly south and gather at one place in the mountains of southern Mexico where they hibernate for the winter. They need the microclimate of an intact forest to survive, but despite official protection, illegal logging undermines their winter habitat in Mexico. A bigger problem for Monarchs however is the loss of their summer habitat in the USA due to the massive use of herbicides, which kills the milkweed plants they depend on. The Monarch population has declined by 80% in the last two decades and experts now advocate that they be listed as an endangered species. When I first visited the Monarch’s wintering grounds in Mexico back in the 1980s more than fifty million of them gathered there. They turned the forest orange and branches broke off trees from the weight of butterflies. To get an idea of the astonishing sights I captured then, go to @FransLanting. And check some of the links below to learn what you can do to help them come back. @ChristineEckstrom @ThePhotoSociety #Monarch #Endangered #CenterforBiodiv #Monarch_Watch #leonardodicaprio


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Please support (me) 💛

Photo by @FransLanting Basking in the sun with wings spread like miniature solar panels, Monarch butterflies cover a pine tree in the mountains of Mexico where they overwinter. How these travellers find their way to that one place in Michoacan that has the right conditions they need remains a mystery. When I first went there to document them I was astonished by the sights of many millions of Monarchs turning an entire forest orange, but their numbers have since plummeted by 90%. Check @FransLanting to see images of the epic phenomenon that I was able to capture then. @ChristineEckstrom @ThePhotoSociety @XercesSociety #Butterfly #Monarch #Endangered #CenterforBiodiv #Monarch_Watch #Migration


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Please support (me) 💛

Photo by @FransLanting Basking in the sun with wings spread like miniature solar panels, Monarch butterflies cover a pine tree in the mountains of Mexico where they overwinter. How these travellers find their way to that one place in Michoacan that has the right conditions they need remains a mystery. When I first went there to document them I was astonished by the sights of many millions of Monarchs turning an entire forest orange, but their numbers have since plummeted by 90%. Check @FransLanting to see images of the epic phenomenon that I was able to capture then. @ChristineEckstrom @ThePhotoSociety @XercesSociety #Butterfly #Monarch #Endangered #CenterforBiodiv #Monarch_Watch #Migration


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Please support (me) 💛

Photo by @FransLanting Basking in the sun with wings spread like miniature solar panels, Monarch butterflies cover a pine tree in the mountains of Mexico where they overwinter. How these travellers find their way to that one place in Michoacan that has the right conditions they need remains a mystery. When I first went there to document them I was astonished by the sights of many millions of Monarchs turning an entire forest orange, but their numbers have since plummeted by 90%. Check @FransLanting to see images of the epic phenomenon that I was able to capture then. @ChristineEckstrom @ThePhotoSociety @XercesSociety #Butterfly #Monarch #Endangered #CenterforBiodiv #Monarch_Watch #Migration


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Please support (me) 💛

Photo by @FransLanting Basking in the sun with wings spread like miniature solar panels, Monarch butterflies cover a pine tree in the mountains of Mexico where they overwinter. How these travellers find their way to that one place in Michoacan that has the right conditions they need remains a mystery. When I first went there to document them I was astonished by the sights of many millions of Monarchs turning an entire forest orange, but their numbers have since plummeted by 90%. Check @FransLanting to see images of the epic phenomenon that I was able to capture then. @ChristineEckstrom @ThePhotoSociety @XercesSociety #Butterfly #Monarch #Endangered #CenterforBiodiv #Monarch_Watch #Migration


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Please support (me) 💛

Photo by @FransLanting Basking in the sun with wings spread like miniature solar panels, Monarch butterflies cover a pine tree in the mountains of Mexico where they overwinter. How these travellers find their way to that one place in Michoacan that has the right conditions they need remains a mystery. When I first went there to document them I was astonished by the sights of many millions of Monarchs turning an entire forest orange, but their numbers have since plummeted by 90%. Check @FransLanting to see images of the epic phenomenon that I was able to capture then. @ChristineEckstrom @ThePhotoSociety @XercesSociety #Butterfly #Monarch #Endangered #CenterforBiodiv #Monarch_Watch #Migration


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Repost By natgeotravel: Photo by @FransLanting Basking in the sun with wings spread like miniature solar panels, Monarch butterflies cover a pine tree in the mountains of Mexico where they overwinter. How these travellers find their way to that one place in Michoacan that has the right conditions they need remains a mystery. When I first went there to document them I was astonished by the sights of many millions of Monarchs turning an entire forest orange, but their numbers have since plummeted by 90%. Check @FransLanting to see images of the epic phenomenon that I was able to capture then. #Butterfly #Monarch #Endangered #CenterforBiodiv #Monarch_Watch #Migration (via #appskottage.com #Grab @AppKottage)


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#Repost @natgeo (@get_repost)
・・・
Photo by @FransLanting Millions of Monarch butterflies are on their way back again to the USA from wintering grounds in Mexico. It’s an epic migration. They cover thousands of miles and reproduce as they go along. They will recolonize North America from the Rocky Mountains to the Atlantic Coast. But at the end of summer, newborn Monarchs fly south and gather at one place in the mountains of southern Mexico where they hibernate for the winter. They need the microclimate of an intact forest to survive, but despite official protection, illegal logging undermines their winter habitat in Mexico. A bigger problem for Monarchs however is the loss of their summer habitat in the USA due to the massive use of herbicides, which kills the milkweed plants they depend on. The Monarch population has declined by 80% in the last two decades and experts now advocate that they be listed as an endangered species. When I first visited the Monarch’s wintering grounds in Mexico back in the 1980s more than fifty million of them gathered there. They turned the forest orange and branches broke off trees from the weight of butterflies. To get an idea of the astonishing sights I captured then, go to @FransLanting. And check some of the links below to learn what you can do to help them come back. @ChristineEckstrom @ThePhotoSociety #Monarch #Endangered #CenterforBiodiv #Monarch_Watch #leonardodicaprio


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So beautiful...
...............
Repost @franslanting
by @media.repost:
Photos by @FransLanting When a rare snowstorm hit the mountains in Mexico where Monarch butterflies had gathered for the winter, millions of them lost their grip and were knocked down to the ground. The entire forest floor was covered in lifeless butterflies, but after the storm passed and temperatures rose, many of them miraculously came back to life. They raised their body temperature by quivering their wings as you can see in these photos. After a while millions of trembling Monarchs were able to slowly crawl up tree trunks with wings spread like solar panels to soak up heat so they could get back to their favorite roosting spots high off the ground. It was an amazing sight, but it also confirmed how vulnerable they are—to weather and to gaps in the forest caused by illegal logging which disturbs the microclimate they need to hibernate. Stay tuned for more survival stories of the natural kind. @ChristineEckstrom @ThePhotoSociety @NatGeoCreative @XercesSociety #Butterfly #Monarch #Endangered #CenterforBiodiv #Monarch_Watch #Migration
#wonder #amazingvancouverisland
#wow #dope #beautiful


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