#HeroesOfTheHimalya Instagram photos and videos

Photo by @renan_ozturk @khumbuclimbingcenter // Oxygen tanks, heavy loads, and precarious steps on Everest. Three years ago today, the day after this picture was taken, a 30-million-pound block of ice collapsed above the treacherous icefall on the standard climbing route. It killed 16 Nepalese high-altitude workers. ~

This is what it looks like for a lot of these workers inside the the Khumbu icefall. While most Westerners only go through the icefall a few times a season, these guys do countless rotations up and down to stock the upper camps. The icefall, a necessary hazard of climbing the south side of Everest, is a maze of giant ice towers and crevasses that can, and do, collapse without warning. These rickety ladders must be continuously re-jiggered throughout the season. In base camp after the avalanche tragedy, we saw the size of the loads some of the Sherpas were carrying that day. They were so huge it made it near impossible to run away from the falling ice blocks. These are the hazards that everyone faces though—Sherpas, Western guides, and climbers together. ~

I was there as part of a film project to document the Sherpas perspective on Everest over the years—this was the breaking point for the high-altitude workforce and a chance to portray the state of affairs and lack of government support. This accident did not slow down the international desire to stand on top of the world. But it did shift the way in which these workers are compensated and insured. The season was canceled, and it became clear to the world that to summit Everest requires the support of these Nepalese people. ~

#russianrulette #dangerousjobs #NepaliLoveYou #SherpaFilm #HeroesOfTheHimalya @conrad_anker @jenniloweanker


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regram @natgeo
Photo by @renan_ozturk @khumbuclimbingcenter // Oxygen tanks, heavy loads, and precarious steps on Everest. Three years ago today, the day after this picture was taken, a 30-million-pound block of ice collapsed above the treacherous icefall on the standard climbing route. It killed 16 Nepalese high-altitude workers. ~

This is what it looks like for a lot of these workers inside the the Khumbu icefall. While most Westerners only go through the icefall a few times a season, these guys do countless rotations up and down to stock the upper camps. The icefall, a necessary hazard of climbing the south side of Everest, is a maze of giant ice towers and crevasses that can, and do, collapse without warning. These rickety ladders must be continuously re-jiggered throughout the season. In base camp after the avalanche tragedy, we saw the size of the loads some of the Sherpas were carrying that day. They were so huge it made it near impossible to run away from the falling ice blocks. These are the hazards that everyone faces though—Sherpas, Western guides, and climbers together. ~

I was there as part of a film project to document the Sherpas perspective on Everest over the years—this was the breaking point for the high-altitude workforce and a chance to portray the state of affairs and lack of government support. This accident did not slow down the international desire to stand on top of the world. But it did shift the way in which these workers are compensated and insured. The season was canceled, and it became clear to the world that to summit Everest requires the support of these Nepalese people. ~

#russianrulette #dangerousjobs #NepaliLoveYou #SherpaFilm #HeroesOfTheHimalya @conrad_anker @jenniloweanker

Mount Everest
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regram @natgeo
Photo by @renan_ozturk @khumbuclimbingcenter // Oxygen tanks, heavy loads, and precarious steps on Everest. Three years ago today, the day after this picture was taken, a 30-million-pound block of ice collapsed above the treacherous icefall on the standard climbing route. It killed 16 Nepalese high-altitude workers. ~

This is what it looks like for a lot of these workers inside the the Khumbu icefall. While most Westerners only go through the icefall a few times a season, these guys do countless rotations up and down to stock the upper camps. The icefall, a necessary hazard of climbing the south side of Everest, is a maze of giant ice towers and crevasses that can, and do, collapse without warning. These rickety ladders must be continuously re-jiggered throughout the season. In base camp after the avalanche tragedy, we saw the size of the loads some of the Sherpas were carrying that day. They were so huge it made it near impossible to run away from the falling ice blocks. These are the hazards that everyone faces though—Sherpas, Western guides, and climbers together. ~

I was there as part of a film project to document the Sherpas perspective on Everest over the years—this was the breaking point for the high-altitude workforce and a chance to portray the state of affairs and lack of government support. This accident did not slow down the international desire to stand on top of the world. But it did shift the way in which these workers are compensated and insured. The season was canceled, and it became clear to the world that to summit Everest requires the support of these Nepalese people. ~

#russianrulette #dangerousjobs #NepaliLoveYou #SherpaFilm #HeroesOfTheHimalya @conrad_anker @jenniloweanker

Mount Everest
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Respect to all sherpas. regram @natgeo
Photo by @renan_ozturk @khumbuclimbingcenter // Oxygen tanks, heavy loads, and precarious steps on Everest. Three years ago today, the day after this picture was taken, a 30-million-pound block of ice collapsed above the treacherous icefall on the standard climbing route. It killed 16 Nepalese high-altitude workers. ~

This is what it looks like for a lot of these workers inside the the Khumbu icefall. While most Westerners only go through the icefall a few times a season, these guys do countless rotations up and down to stock the upper camps. The icefall, a necessary hazard of climbing the south side of Everest, is a maze of giant ice towers and crevasses that can, and do, collapse without warning. These rickety ladders must be continuously re-jiggered throughout the season. In base camp after the avalanche tragedy, we saw the size of the loads some of the Sherpas were carrying that day. They were so huge it made it near impossible to run away from the falling ice blocks. These are the hazards that everyone faces though—Sherpas, Western guides, and climbers together. ~

I was there as part of a film project to document the Sherpas perspective on Everest over the years—this was the breaking point for the high-altitude workforce and a chance to portray the state of affairs and lack of government support. This accident did not slow down the international desire to stand on top of the world. But it did shift the way in which these workers are compensated and insured. The season was canceled, and it became clear to the world that to summit Everest requires the support of these Nepalese people. ~

#russianrulette #dangerousjobs #NepaliLoveYou #SherpaFilm #HeroesOfTheHimalya @conrad_anker @jenniloweanker

Mount Everest
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regram @natgeo - Photo by @renan_ozturk @khumbuclimbingcenter // Oxygen tanks, heavy loads, and precarious steps on Everest. Three years ago today, the day after this picture was taken, a 30-million-pound block of ice collapsed above the treacherous icefall on the standard climbing route. It killed 16 Nepalese high-altitude workers. ~

This is what it looks like for a lot of these workers inside the the Khumbu icefall. While most Westerners only go through the icefall a few times a season, these guys do countless rotations up and down to stock the upper camps. The icefall, a necessary hazard of climbing the south side of Everest, is a maze of giant ice towers and crevasses that can, and do, collapse without warning. These rickety ladders must be continuously re-jiggered throughout the season. In base camp after the avalanche tragedy, we saw the size of the loads some of the Sherpas were carrying that day. They were so huge it made it near impossible to run away from the falling ice blocks. These are the hazards that everyone faces though—Sherpas, Western guides, and climbers together. ~

I was there as part of a film project to document the Sherpas perspective on Everest over the years—this was the breaking point for the high-altitude workforce and a chance to portray the state of affairs and lack of government support. This accident did not slow down the international desire to stand on top of the world. But it did shift the way in which these workers are compensated and insured. The season was canceled, and it became clear to the world that to summit Everest requires the support of these Nepalese people. ~

#russianrulette #dangerousjobs #NepaliLoveYou #SherpaFilm #HeroesOfTheHimalya @conrad_anker @jenniloweankerregram - #regrann


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#Repost @natgeo with @repostapp
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Photo by @renan_ozturk @khumbuclimbingcenter // Oxygen tanks, heavy loads, and precarious steps on Everest. Three years ago today, the day after this picture was taken, a 30-million-pound block of ice collapsed above the treacherous icefall on the standard climbing route. It killed 16 Nepalese high-altitude workers. ~

This is what it looks like for a lot of these workers inside the the Khumbu icefall. While most Westerners only go through the icefall a few times a season, these guys do countless rotations up and down to stock the upper camps. The icefall, a necessary hazard of climbing the south side of Everest, is a maze of giant ice towers and crevasses that can, and do, collapse without warning. These rickety ladders must be continuously re-jiggered throughout the season. In base camp after the avalanche tragedy, we saw the size of the loads some of the Sherpas were carrying that day. They were so huge it made it near impossible to run away from the falling ice blocks. These are the hazards that everyone faces though—Sherpas, Western guides, and climbers together. ~

I was there as part of a film project to document the Sherpas perspective on Everest over the years—this was the breaking point for the high-altitude workforce and a chance to portray the state of affairs and lack of government support. This accident did not slow down the international desire to stand on top of the world. But it did shift the way in which these workers are compensated and insured. The season was canceled, and it became clear to the world that to summit Everest requires the support of these Nepalese people. ~

#russianrulette #dangerousjobs #NepaliLoveYou #SherpaFilm #HeroesOfTheHimalya @conrad_anker @jenniloweanker


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Моя мечта - совершить восхождение на Эверест. Конечно, скалолаз из меня - как водитель, но пока ещё есть время подготовиться - детки подрастут, можно будет задуматься об этом. серьёзнее. Фото - репост National Geographic @natgeo, у них распродажа фото с подписями авторов в честь дня Земли. Купила к нам домой белую пушистую нерпу, которая прячется под льдиной от ветров, повесим в комнату кого-то из малышей #Repost @natgeo
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Photo by @renan_ozturk @khumbuclimbingcenter // Oxygen tanks, heavy loads, and precarious steps on Everest. Three years ago today, the day after this picture was taken, a 30-million-pound block of ice collapsed above the treacherous icefall on the standard climbing route. It killed 16 Nepalese high-altitude workers. ~

This is what it looks like for a lot of these workers inside the the Khumbu icefall. While most Westerners only go through the icefall a few times a season, these guys do countless rotations up and down to stock the upper camps. The icefall, a necessary hazard of climbing the south side of Everest, is a maze of giant ice towers and crevasses that can, and do, collapse without warning. These rickety ladders must be continuously re-jiggered throughout the season. In base camp after the avalanche tragedy, we saw the size of the loads some of the Sherpas were carrying that day. They were so huge it made it near impossible to run away from the falling ice blocks. These are the hazards that everyone faces though—Sherpas, Western guides, and climbers together. ~

I was there as part of a film project to document the Sherpas perspective on Everest over the years—this was the breaking point for the high-altitude workforce and a chance to portray the state of affairs and lack of government support. This accident did not slow down the international desire to stand on top of the world. But it did shift the way in which these workers are compensated and insured. The season was canceled, and it became clear to the world that to summit Everest requires the support of these Nepalese people. ~

#russianrulette #dangerousjobs #NepaliLoveYou #SherpaFilm #HeroesOfTheHimalya @conrad_anker @jenniloweanker


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And some of us just feel proud of the random #trekking we have done in our lives!!! #Repost @natgeo with @repostapp
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Photo by @renan_ozturk @khumbuclimbingcenter // Oxygen tanks, heavy loads, and precarious steps on Everest. Three years ago today, the day after this picture was taken, a 30-million-pound block of ice collapsed above the treacherous icefall on the standard climbing route. It killed 16 Nepalese high-altitude workers. ~

This is what it looks like for a lot of these workers inside the the Khumbu icefall. While most Westerners only go through the icefall a few times a season, these guys do countless rotations up and down to stock the upper camps. The icefall, a necessary hazard of climbing the south side of Everest, is a maze of giant ice towers and crevasses that can, and do, collapse without warning. These rickety ladders must be continuously re-jiggered throughout the season. In base camp after the avalanche tragedy, we saw the size of the loads some of the Sherpas were carrying that day. They were so huge it made it near impossible to run away from the falling ice blocks. These are the hazards that everyone faces though—Sherpas, Western guides, and climbers together. ~

I was there as part of a film project to document the Sherpas perspective on Everest over the years—this was the breaking point for the high-altitude workforce and a chance to portray the state of affairs and lack of government support. This accident did not slow down the international desire to stand on top of the world. But it did shift the way in which these workers are compensated and insured. The season was canceled, and it became clear to the world that to summit Everest requires the support of these Nepalese people. ~

#russianrulette #dangerousjobs #NepaliLoveYou #SherpaFilm #HeroesOfTheHimalya @conrad_anker @jenniloweanker


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Photo by @renan_ozturk @khumbuclimbingcenter // Oxygen tanks, heavy loads, and precarious steps on Everest. Three years ago today, the day after this picture was taken, a 30-million-pound block of ice collapsed above the treacherous icefall on the standard climbing route. It killed 16 Nepalese high-altitude workers. ~

This is what it looks like for a lot of these workers inside the the Khumbu icefall. While most Westerners only go through the icefall a few times a season, these guys do countless rotations up and down to stock the upper camps. The icefall, a necessary hazard of climbing the south side of Everest, is a maze of giant ice towers and crevasses that can, and do, collapse without warning. These rickety ladders must be continuously re-jiggered throughout the season. In base camp after the avalanche tragedy, we saw the size of the loads some of the Sherpas were carrying that day. They were so huge it made it near impossible to run away from the falling ice blocks. These are the hazards that everyone faces though—Sherpas, Western guides, and climbers together. ~

I was there as part of a film project to document the Sherpas perspective on Everest over the years—this was the breaking point for the high-altitude workforce and a chance to portray the state of affairs and lack of government support. This accident did not slow down the international desire to stand on top of the world. But it did shift the way in which these workers are compensated and insured. The season was canceled, and it became clear to the world that to summit Everest requires the support of these Nepalese people. ~

#russianrulette #dangerousjobs #NepaliLoveYou #SherpaFilm #HeroesOfTheHimalya @conrad_anker @jenniloweanker

Mount Everest
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Good Bless all the soul @Regrann from @natgeo - Photo by @renan_ozturk @khumbuclimbingcenter // Oxygen tanks, heavy loads, and precarious steps on Everest. Three years ago today, the day after this picture was taken, a 30-million-pound block of ice collapsed above the treacherous icefall on the standard climbing route. It killed 16 Nepalese high-altitude workers. ~

This is what it looks like for a lot of these workers inside the the Khumbu icefall. While most Westerners only go through the icefall a few times a season, these guys do countless rotations up and down to stock the upper camps. The icefall, a necessary hazard of climbing the south side of Everest, is a maze of giant ice towers and crevasses that can, and do, collapse without warning. These rickety ladders must be continuously re-jiggered throughout the season. In base camp after the avalanche tragedy, we saw the size of the loads some of the Sherpas were carrying that day. They were so huge it made it near impossible to run away from the falling ice blocks. These are the hazards that everyone faces though—Sherpas, Western guides, and climbers together. ~

I was there as part of a film project to document the Sherpas perspective on Everest over the years—this was the breaking point for the high-altitude workforce and a chance to portray the state of affairs and lack of government support. This accident did not slow down the international desire to stand on top of the world. But it did shift the way in which these workers are compensated and insured. The season was canceled, and it became clear to the world that to summit Everest requires the support of these Nepalese people. ~

#russianrulette #dangerousjobs #NepaliLoveYou #SherpaFilm #HeroesOfTheHimalya @conrad_anker @jenniloweanker - #regrann


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Photo by @renan_ozturk @khumbuclimbingcenter // Oxygen tanks, heavy loads, and precarious steps on Everest. Three years ago today, the day after this picture was taken, a 30-million-pound block of ice collapsed above the treacherous icefall on the standard climbing route. It killed 16 Nepalese high-altitude workers. ~

This is what it looks like for a lot of these workers inside the the Khumbu icefall. While most Westerners only go through the icefall a few times a season, these guys do countless rotations up and down to stock the upper camps. The icefall, a necessary hazard of climbing the south side of Everest, is a maze of giant ice towers and crevasses that can, and do, collapse without warning. These rickety ladders must be continuously re-jiggered throughout the season. In base camp after the avalanche tragedy, we saw the size of the loads some of the Sherpas were carrying that day. They were so huge it made it near impossible to run away from the falling ice blocks. These are the hazards that everyone faces though—Sherpas, Western guides, and climbers together. ~

I was there as part of a film project to document the Sherpas perspective on Everest over the years—this was the breaking point for the high-altitude workforce and a chance to portray the state of affairs and lack of government support. This accident did not slow down the international desire to stand on top of the world. But it did shift the way in which these workers are compensated and insured. The season was canceled, and it became clear to the world that to summit Everest requires the support of these Nepalese people. ~

#russianrulette #dangerousjobs #NepaliLoveYou #SherpaFilm #HeroesOfTheHimalya @conrad_anker @jenniloweanker

Mount Everest
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@Regrann from @discoverychannel - From @renan_ozturk: "Thanks so much for following along with my stories, and thanks to #SherpaFilm for allowing me to share a bit of my experiences from the Everest region. As you know, Nepal recently suffered immensely from an earthquake and a number of aftershocks. The one ubiquitous message I would leave you is to consider the incredible and positive effect that traveling to Nepal and the Himalaya will have on you. To know Nepal is to love her. The majesty of her mountains inspires awe and a reassuring sense of perspective. The grace of her people floods your heart with the buoyant certainty that we are all kin. Together, we need to remind the world that in the wake Nepal's recent tragedy, her loveliness remains. Nepal urgently needs tourism to return, and she needs long-term financial support for reconstruction. For both, the world needs to see beyond the destruction.#NepaliLoveYou #SherpaFilm #HeroesOfTheHimalya"

Renan is a @thenorthface professional climber, @camp4collective adventure filmmaker and landscape artist who was the high-altitude director and main cinematographer of the feature doc SHERPA. He's taking over our Instagram today in honor of #Sherpa, part of #ElevationWeekend on #Discovery.
Image Credit: Renan Ozturk - #regrann


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Photo and text by @renan_ozturk || Renan Ozturk © Yaks (and female naks) play such an important role in the Everest region not only for getting equipment to base camp but also in daily life. Most Sherpa families have a number of yaks that help them move food up the valley from the Sunday market. They also eat nak milk and cheese throughout the year, and, most important, the dung patties are crucial fuel to heat homes during in the winter time. These beautiful mountain creatures cannot survive at altitudes below ~9K feet and are highly respected in the region beyond their roles as the “beasts of burden.” The yak herders themselves lead incredibly beautiful lives, ones I admire for what seems to me so peaceful an existence. #NepaliLoveYou #SherpaFilm #HeroesOfTheHimalya ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ #deluxe_photographers #travelling #viajeros #natgeo #yak #travelers #wilderness #places #wonderful_destinations #greatcaptures #dp_shots #animals #fauna #life #planetearth #instagram #instagramers #jaw_dropping_shots


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I wish I was half as angelic as she is. #heroesofthehimalya 🙏🏼 @natgeo ✨

Khumbu Glacier
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