#NASA

Instagram photos and videos

#Repost @nasa (@get_repost)
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View these celestial beauties taken by the Hubble Space Telescope (@NASAHubble) and released as a set of modern views of the "Messier Catalog." Spotting comets was all the rage in the middle of the 18th century, and at the forefront of the comet hunt was a young French astronomer named Charles Messier. In 1774, in an effort to help fellow comet seekers steer clear of astronomical objects that were not comets (something that frustrated his own search for these elusive entities), Messier published the first version of his “Catalog of Nebulae and Star Clusters,” a collection of celestial objects that weren’t comets and should be avoided during comet hunting. Today, rather than avoiding these objects, many amateur astronomers actively seek them out as interesting targets to observe with backyard telescopes, binoculars or sometimes even with the naked eye.

Hubble’s version of the Messier catalog includes eight newly processed images never before released by NASA. The images were extracted from more than 1.3 million observations that now reside in the Hubble data archive. Some of these images represent the first Hubble views of the objects, while others include newer, higher resolution images taken with Hubble’s latest cameras.

Image credit: NASA/ESA + others
#nasa #hubble #astronomy #science #cosmos #universe #celestialobject #stars #galaxies #nebula #telescope #nightsky #constellation


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06 Oct, 2017. Look both ways before crossing
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Back in July I visited this level crossing on a rural railway line and captured a couple of vertical panoramas. The first one was posted on 3 August and it showed the Milky Way stretching up from the northeast. My image today is the bookend or “pigeon-pair” to that photo, taken at the same spot but looking in the opposite direction with the Milky Way stretching down from the vertical towards the southwest. 🌌💫
It’s probably too small to see here but I caught a meteor as it flashed across the Milky Way’s core region, just underneath the “Dark Horse” nebula, aka the “Galactic Kiwi” for we Southern Hemisphere folk. 📷
This vertical panorama was created using nine overlapping images that were each shot with a Canon EOS 6D, Rokinon 24mm @ f/2.4, 13 sec @ ISO 6400.
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plz double tab if you love it
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via @nightscapades
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#tbt to my first intern! (Dina). She helped me develop a better fire shelter over the summer and also taught me how to be a better mentor #NASA #NASALaRC

NASA Langley Research Center
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Field trip #Nasa


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Dr. Michael Stamatikos is giving a talk on black holes tonight! #astrophysicist #vastuniverse #NASA


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A beleza do Universo! 🔭🌌💫💙 #Repost @nasa (@get_repost)
・・・
View these celestial beauties taken by the Hubble Space Telescope (@NASAHubble) and released as a set of modern views of the "Messier Catalog." Spotting comets was all the rage in the middle of the 18th century, and at the forefront of the comet hunt was a young French astronomer named Charles Messier. In 1774, in an effort to help fellow comet seekers steer clear of astronomical objects that were not comets (something that frustrated his own search for these elusive entities), Messier published the first version of his “Catalog of Nebulae and Star Clusters,” a collection of celestial objects that weren’t comets and should be avoided during comet hunting. Today, rather than avoiding these objects, many amateur astronomers actively seek them out as interesting targets to observe with backyard telescopes, binoculars or sometimes even with the naked eye.

Hubble’s version of the Messier catalog includes eight newly processed images never before released by NASA. The images were extracted from more than 1.3 million observations that now reside in the Hubble data archive. Some of these images represent the first Hubble views of the objects, while others include newer, higher resolution images taken with Hubble’s latest cameras.

Image credit: NASA/ESA + others
#nasa #hubble #astronomy #science #cosmos #universe #celestialobject #stars #galaxies #nebula #telescope #nightsky #constellation


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Soft, comfy, and reliable. Go grab one at NebulaStreetwear.com!


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Woo! New house plants! Should I buckle them in?

Portland Nursery
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Celestial beauties!!! Aren’t we all? Shine, shine, shine!!! ✨🌠🌠🌠✨#nasa #Repost @nasa (@get_repost)
・・・
View these celestial beauties taken by the Hubble Space Telescope (@NASAHubble) and released as a set of modern views of the "Messier Catalog." Spotting comets was all the rage in the middle of the 18th century, and at the forefront of the comet hunt was a young French astronomer named Charles Messier. In 1774, in an effort to help fellow comet seekers steer clear of astronomical objects that were not comets (something that frustrated his own search for these elusive entities), Messier published the first version of his “Catalog of Nebulae and Star Clusters,” a collection of celestial objects that weren’t comets and should be avoided during comet hunting. Today, rather than avoiding these objects, many amateur astronomers actively seek them out as interesting targets to observe with backyard telescopes, binoculars or sometimes even with the naked eye.

Hubble’s version of the Messier catalog includes eight newly processed images never before released by NASA. The images were extracted from more than 1.3 million observations that now reside in the Hubble data archive. Some of these images represent the first Hubble views of the objects, while others include newer, higher resolution images taken with Hubble’s latest cameras.

Image credit: NASA/ESA + others
#nasa #hubble #astronomy #science #cosmos #universe #celestialobject #stars #galaxies #nebula #telescope #nightsky #constellation


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