#NaturesReturn

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#AfricanParks#NaturesReturn#AnnualReport#Restoration#Malawi#Regram#RG#Nkhotakota#Repost#naturesreturn#wildlife#Majete#Liwonde#elephant#DRC#Rangers#Forceforgood#Garamba#Giraffe#bethechange#Ivory#saynotopoaching#Cambodia#savetherhino#rhinopoaching#USA#princeharry#China#Vietnam#ecotourism#noēsis#savetheelephants

Hashtags #NaturesReturn for Instagram

· Last year African Parks completed one of the most ambitious conservation projects – moving 520 elephants 650 kilometres, from Liwonde National Park and Majete Wildlife Reserve to their new home in Nkhotakota Wildlife Reserve in Malawi. In Liwonde and Majete, increasing elephant populations in those small parks were creating human-wildlife conflict and habitat degradation. By contrast, the population in Nkhotakota had been decimated by poaching where more than 1,500 elephants had declined to fewer than 100 in the past 20 years.
Watch the trailer of the documentary Wildlife Savers, unsung heroes: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s5D3IDzYEp4&t=2s
#AfricanParks #ByNatureFilms #PlukMedia #WorldElephantDay #Elephants# Conservation #NaturesReturn #500elephants #worthmorealive #Malawi #Majete #Liwonde #Nkhotakota #Conservation #naturefilms #wildlifefilms #wildlife #animals #nature #naturephotography #contemporaryart #elephants


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· Last year African Parks completed one of the most ambitious conservation projects – moving 520 elephants 650 kilometres, from Liwonde National Park and Majete Wildlife Reserve to their new home in Nkhotakota Wildlife Reserve in Malawi. In Liwonde and Majete, increasing elephant populations in those small parks were creating human-wildlife conflict and habitat degradation. By contrast, the population in Nkhotakota had been decimated by poaching where more than 1,500 elephants had declined to fewer than 100 in the past 20 years.
Watch the trailer of the documentary Wildlife Savers, unsung heroes: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s5D3IDzYEp4&t=2s
#AfricanParks #ByNatureFilms #PlukMedia #WorldElephantDay #Elephants# Conservation #NaturesReturn #500elephants #worthmorealive #Malawi #Majete #Liwonde #Nkhotakota #Conservation #naturefilms #wildlifefilms #wildlife #animals


0

· Last year African Parks completed one of the most ambitious conservation projects – moving 520 elephants 650 kilometres, from Liwonde National Park and Majete Wildlife Reserve to their new home in Nkhotakota Wildlife Reserve in Malawi. In Liwonde and Majete, increasing elephant populations in those small parks were creating human-wildlife conflict and habitat degradation. By contrast, the population in Nkhotakota had been decimated by poaching where more than 1,500 elephants had declined to fewer than 100 in the past 20 years.
Watch the trailer of the documentary Wildlife Savers, unsung heroes: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s5D3IDzYEp4&t=2s
#AfricanParks #ByNatureFilms #PlukMedia #WorldElephantDay #Elephants# Conservation #NaturesReturn #500elephants #worthmorealive #Malawi #Majete #Liwonde #Nkhotakota #Conservation #naturefilms #wildlifefilms #wildlife #animals


0

Last year African Parks completed one of the most ambitious conservation projects – moving 520 elephants 650 kilometres, from Liwonde National Park and Majete Wildlife Reserve to their new home in Nkhotakota Wildlife Reserve in Malawi. In Liwonde and Majete, increasing elephant populations in those small parks were creating human-wildlife conflict and habitat degradation. By contrast, the population in Nkhotakota had been decimated by poaching where more than 1,500 elephants had declined to fewer than 100 in the past 20 years.
Watch the trailer of the documentary Wildlife Savers, unsung heroes: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s5D3IDzYEp4&t=b2s
#AfricanParks #ByNatureFilms #PlukMedia #WorldElephantDay #Elephants# Conservation #NaturesReturn #500elephants #worthmorealive #Malawi #Majete #Liwonde #Nkhotakota #Conservation #artphotography #naturefilms #wildlifefilms #wildlife #animals


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How do you move 520 elephants? Late last year we completed one of our most ambitious conservation projects to date – moving 520 elephants 650 kilometres, from Liwonde National Park and Majete Wildlife Reserve to their new home in Nkhotakota Wildlife Reserve in Malawi. In Liwonde and Majete, increasing elephant populations in those small parks were creating human-wildlife conflict and habitat degradation. By contrast, the population in Nkhotakota had been decimated by poaching where more than 1,500 elephants had declined to fewer than 100 in the past 20 years. African Parks assumed management of Nkhotakota in 2015 and immediately set to work improving law enforcement and working with communities. With safety restored, African Parks prepared for what would be one of the largest elephant translocations in history. In 2016, after months of preparation, the translocation began, moving small family units at a time to reduces stress and help them adapt successfully to their new environment. Today, the herd has continued to breed and grow which is increasing tourism to this one poorly visited park – bringing with them new life and hope for elephants and people alike. Please consider donating today through the link in our bio where 100% of your donation goes directly to the parks and makes conservation initiatives like these possible. 📷 @pedromcbride #AfricanParks #WorldElephantDay #Elephants #Conservation #NaturesReturn #500elephants #worthmorealive #Malawi #Majete #Liwonde #Nkhotakota


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#Repost @africanparksnetwork with @get_repost
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While there are just 47 Kordofan giraffe left in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), they are slowly on the rise. Only 3,000 remain in scattered populations across their range in Africa (with the largest population in Zakouma National Park in Chad), and these 47 in Garamba are the last of the subspecies living in the entire DRC. Insecurity, armed conflict and relentless poaching – where they were targeted simply for their tails which were sold as dowries - pushed them to the brink of extinction. By 2016, only 40 individuals remained. Protecting wildlife in @garamba_national_park has been particularly challenging given the size of the park, which spans 12,400 km2, and sits on the border with South Sudan. But we’ve seen a change in the last two years, and our law enforcement efforts are paying off. Elephant poaching is down 50% and this year, only two elephants have been lost. The last Kordofan Giraffe have had a few births, and are up to 47; and other key populations are either stable or on the increase. Our growing ranger force is also providing security to tens of thousands of people living around the park, creating safe places for new life, and hope, to return to this corner of the world again. Footage courtesy of @warren_smart #AfricanParks #Garamba #Rangers #Forceforgood #naturesreturn #DRC #Giraffe #wildlife


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Hunting animals is not a sport nor trophy there's other ways to get real trophy by
Not killing someone.

While there are just 47 Kordofan giraffe left in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), they are slowly on the rise. Only 3,000 remain in scattered populations across their range in Africa (with the largest population in Zakouma National Park in Chad), and these 47 in Garamba are the last of the subspecies living in the entire DRC. Insecurity, armed conflict and relentless poaching – where they were targeted simply for their tails which were sold as dowries - pushed them to the brink of extinction. By 2016, only 40 individuals remained. Protecting wildlife in @garamba_national_park has been particularly challenging given the size of the park, which spans 12,400 km2, and sits on the border with South Sudan. But we’ve seen a change in the last two years, and our law enforcement efforts are paying off. Elephant poaching is down 50% and this year, only two elephants have been lost. The last Kordofan Giraffe have had a few births, and are up to 47; and other key populations are either stable or on the increase. Our growing ranger force is also providing security to tens of thousands of people living around the park, creating safe places for new life, and hope, to return to this corner of the world again. Footage courtesy of @warren_smart #AfricanParks #Garamba #Rangers #Forceforgood #naturesreturn #DRC #Giraffe #wildlife #repost #bethechange #vine #follow #crueltyfree #banhunting #quote #outdoors #fit #follow #crueltyfree #compassion #nature #vine #tbt


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It is something spectacular to see these creatures running wild in their natural habitat 🙌😍🦒 Taking it all in.. What an incredible clip. Mahalo to the hardworking rangers risking their lives for our endangered animals 💖 .
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#Repost @africanparksnetwork -- "While there are just 47 Kordofan giraffe left in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), they are slowly on the rise. Only 3,000 remain in scattered populations across their range in Africa (with the largest population in Zakouma National Park in Chad), and these 47 in Garamba are the last of the subspecies living in the entire DRC. Insecurity, armed conflict and relentless poaching – where they were targeted simply for their tails which were sold as dowries - pushed them to the brink of extinction. By 2016, only 40 individuals remained. Protecting wildlife in @garamba_national_park has been particularly challenging given the size of the park, which spans 12,400 km2, and sits on the border with South Sudan. But we’ve seen a change in the last two years, and our law enforcement efforts are paying off. Elephant poaching is down 50% and this year, only two elephants have been lost. The last Kordofan Giraffe have had a few births, and are up to 47; and other key populations are either stable or on the increase. Our growing ranger force is also providing security to tens of thousands of people living around the park, creating safe places for new life, and hope, to return to this corner of the world again. Footage courtesy of @warren_smart"
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#AfricanParks #Garamba #Rangers #Forceforgood #naturesreturn #DRC #Giraffe #wildlife #africa #earth #nature #wild #spectacular #beautiful #feels #love #happy #goals #life #everyday #hawaii #nonprofit #rangers #protection #hope #slowmo #parks #greenery #drone


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#Repost @africanparksnetwork with @get_repost
・・・
While there are just 47 Kordofan giraffe left in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), they are slowly on the rise. Only 3,000 remain in scattered populations across their range in Africa (with the largest population in Zakouma National Park in Chad), and these 47 in Garamba are the last of the subspecies living in the entire DRC. Insecurity, armed conflict and relentless poaching – where they were targeted simply for their tails which were sold as dowries - pushed them to the brink of extinction. By 2016, only 40 individuals remained. Protecting wildlife in @garamba_national_park has been particularly challenging given the size of the park, which spans 12,400 km2, and sits on the border with South Sudan. But we’ve seen a change in the last two years, and our law enforcement efforts are paying off. Elephant poaching is down 50% and this year, only two elephants have been lost. The last Kordofan Giraffe have had a few births, and are up to 47; and other key populations are either stable or on the increase. Our growing ranger force is also providing security to tens of thousands of people living around the park, creating safe places for new life, and hope, to return to this corner of the world again. Footage courtesy of @warren_smart #AfricanParks #Garamba #Rangers #Forceforgood #naturesreturn #DRC #Giraffe #wildlife


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#Repost @africanparksnetwork

While there are just 47 Kordofan giraffe left in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), they are slowly on the rise. Only 3,000 remain in scattered populations across their range in Africa (with the largest population in Zakouma National Park in Chad), and these 47 in Garamba are the last of the subspecies living in the entire DRC. Insecurity, armed conflict and relentless poaching – where they were targeted simply for their tails which were sold as dowries - pushed them to the brink of extinction. By 2016, only 40 individuals remained. Protecting wildlife in @garamba_national_park has been particularly challenging given the size of the park, which spans 12,400 km2, and sits on the border with South Sudan. But we’ve seen a change in the last two years, and our law enforcement efforts are paying off. Elephant poaching is down 50% and this year, only two elephants have been lost. The last Kordofan Giraffe have had a few births, and are up to 47; and other key populations are either stable or on the increase. Our growing ranger force is also providing security to tens of thousands of people living around the park, creating safe places for new life, and hope, to return to this corner of the world again. Footage courtesy of @warren_smart #AfricanParks #Garamba #Rangers #Forceforgood #naturesreturn #DRC #Giraffe #wildlife


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So beautiful 🦒🦒🦒 Repost from @africanparksnetwork using @RepostRegramApp - While there are just 47 Kordofan giraffe left in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), they are slowly on the rise. Only 3,000 remain in scattered populations across their range in Africa (with the largest population in Zakouma National Park in Chad), and these 47 in Garamba are the last of the subspecies living in the entire DRC. Insecurity, armed conflict and relentless poaching – where they were targeted simply for their tails which were sold as dowries - pushed them to the brink of extinction. By 2016, only 40 individuals remained. Protecting wildlife in @garamba_national_park has been particularly challenging given the size of the park, which spans 12,400 km2, and sits on the border with South Sudan. But we’ve seen a change in the last two years, and our law enforcement efforts are paying off. Elephant poaching is down 50% and this year, only two elephants have been lost. The last Kordofan Giraffe have had a few births, and are up to 47; and other key populations are either stable or on the increase. Our growing ranger force is also providing security to tens of thousands of people living around the park, creating safe places for new life, and hope, to return to this corner of the world again. Footage courtesy of @warren_smart #AfricanParks #Garamba #Rangers #Forceforgood #naturesreturn #DRC #Giraffe #wildlife


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#Repost @africanparksnetwork with @get_repost
・・・
While there are just 47 Kordofan giraffe left in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), they are slowly on the rise. Only 3,000 remain in scattered populations across their range in Africa (with the largest population in Zakouma National Park in Chad), and these 47 in Garamba are the last of the subspecies living in the entire DRC. Insecurity, armed conflict and relentless poaching – where they were targeted simply for their tails which were sold as dowries - pushed them to the brink of extinction. By 2016, only 40 individuals remained. Protecting wildlife in @garamba_national_park has been particularly challenging given the size of the park, which spans 12,400 km2, and sits on the border with South Sudan. But we’ve seen a change in the last two years, and our law enforcement efforts are paying off. Elephant poaching is down 50% and this year, only two elephants have been lost. The last Kordofan Giraffe have had a few births, and are up to 47; and other key populations are either stable or on the increase. Our growing ranger force is also providing security to tens of thousands of people living around the park, creating safe places for new life, and hope, to return to this corner of the world again. Footage courtesy of @warren_smart #AfricanParks #Garamba #Rangers #Forceforgood #naturesreturn #DRC #Giraffe #wildlife


2

While there are just 47 Kordofan giraffe left in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), they are slowly on the rise. Only 3,000 remain in scattered populations across their range in Africa (with the largest population in Zakouma National Park in Chad), and these 47 in Garamba are the last of the subspecies living in the entire DRC. Insecurity, armed conflict and relentless poaching – where they were targeted simply for their tails which were sold as dowries - pushed them to the brink of extinction. By 2016, only 40 individuals remained. Protecting wildlife in @garamba_national_park has been particularly challenging given the size of the park, which spans 12,400 km2, and sits on the border with South Sudan. But we’ve seen a change in the last two years, and our law enforcement efforts are paying off. Elephant poaching is down 50% and this year, only two elephants have been lost. The last Kordofan Giraffe have had a few births, and are up to 47; and other key populations are either stable or on the increase. Our growing ranger force is also providing security to tens of thousands of people living around the park, creating safe places for new life, and hope, to return to this corner of the world again. Footage courtesy of @warren_smart #AfricanParks #Garamba #Rangers #Forceforgood #naturesreturn #DRC #Giraffe #wildlife


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Help protect our babies 🦍 #Repost @african parks network
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Odzala-Kokoua National Park in the Congo is one of Africa’s oldest national parks, designated in 1935, and it received a Biosphere Reserve status in 1977. Covering an expansive 13,500 km2 area, Odzala lies in the heart of the Congo Basin. The basin is the second largest rainforest in the world, spanning more than two million square kilometers across six countries and accounting for 18% of the world's remaining rainforest. The biological diversity and endemism are extraordinary here, especially considering that humans have occupied the area for over 50,000 years. Today, the basin provides clean water, food and shelter to more than 75 million people. Despite the appearance of this breath-taking landscape, Odzala has had its share of ups and downs. Conservation efforts were very limited during the Congo Civil War from 1997 to 1999; several Ebola outbreaks threatened the gorilla population and led to the park being neglected, and victim to high levels of poaching for several years; and tourism was all but non-existent. ⠀
African Parks entered into a 25-year-long agreement in 2010 with the Ministry of Forest Economy, Sustainable Development and Environment to protect this globally significant park. Bushmeat poaching here has been and continues to be a significant threat, with almost 36,000 snares removed in the last year alone which is a major concern for Odzala’s western lowland gorillas, of which significantly 20 percent of the remaining global population is found in the park. Odzala is a vast wilderness, but the threats are many, and the survival of Congo’s elephants and gorillas, and the long-term future of this historic park depend on our intervention. Read the full story by clicking the link in the bio. Photo: @love_wild_africa
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Our work in Odzala is only possible due to the support of our partners - the Ministry of Forest Economy, Sustainable Development and Environment, Fondation Odzala, the EU, Swedish Postcode Foundation, @usfws, @wwf_deutschland and WWF-US.⠀
#AfricanParks #AnnualReport #Restoration #NaturesReturn #odzala #congo @ccc_odzala #Baby #Gorilla #Animals


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©️ #Repost @africanparksnetwork
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Nkhotakota Wildlife Reserve has had a difficult past. Decades of poaching and lawlessness saw a previously productive 1,800 km2 reserve with 1,500 elephants in the 1990’s reduced to fewer than 100 individuals. Game animals were hunted out. Nkhotakota had become an empty Reserve. With wildlife practically gone, there was no reason to visit Nkhotakota, no revenue, no productivity, and little to no value for the surrounding communities. But African Parks had a different vision for the most extensive remaining wild landscape in Malawi, one that included bringing it back to life. Upon assuming management in 2015, we immediately began preparing Nkhotakota for one of the world’s largest wildlife translocations. By August 2017, over a two-year period, the park received almost 500 elephants and 2,000 other animals. Poaching has been dramatically reduced through the presence of a well-trained and equipped ranger team, tourism has begun to increase, and the birth of new calves born in the park from the 2016 translocated elephants has already been documented. Extreme measures were taken to restore this landscape, and it was an extraordinary collaboration between the Government of Malawi, our donors and the team in Nkhotakota. It is early days, but in only two short years, already this park symbolises possibility and what nature can do with our help if only given the chance. Read the full story by clicking the link in the bio. 📷 @frankweitzer
_________________________________________⠀
Our work in Nkhotakota would not be possible without the support of our key partners: the DNPW, @postcodeloterij , @peoplespostcodelottery , Stichting Dioraphte, the Wyss Foundation and WWF-Belguim.⠀

#AfricanParks #AnnualReport #Restoration #NaturesReturn #Nkhotakota #Malawi #travelmore #goexplore #wonderfulplaces #luxury #travel_malawi #visit2malawi


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#Regram #RG @africanparksnetwork: Nkhotakota Wildlife Reserve has had a difficult past. Decades of poaching and lawlessness saw a previously productive 1,800 km2 reserve with 1,500 elephants in the 1990’s reduced to fewer than 100 individuals. Game animals were hunted out. Nkhotakota had become an empty Reserve. With wildlife practically gone, there was no reason to visit Nkhotakota, no revenue, no productivity, and little to no value for the surrounding communities. But African Parks had a different vision for the most extensive remaining wild landscape in Malawi, one that included bringing it back to life. Upon assuming management in 2015, we immediately began preparing Nkhotakota for one of the world’s largest wildlife translocations. By August 2017, over a two-year period, the park received almost 500 elephants and 2,000 other animals. Poaching has been dramatically reduced through the presence of a well-trained and equipped ranger team, tourism has begun to increase, and the birth of new calves born in the park from the 2016 translocated elephants has already been documented. Extreme measures were taken to restore this landscape, and it was an extraordinary collaboration between the Government of Malawi, our donors and the team in Nkhotakota. It is early days, but in only two short years, already this park symbolises possibility and what nature can do with our help if only given the chance. Read the full story by clicking the link in the bio. 📷 @frankweitzer
_________________________________________⠀
Our work in Nkhotakota would not be possible without the support of our key partners: the DNPW, @postcodeloterij , @peoplespostcodelottery , Stichting Dioraphte, the Wyss Foundation and WWF-Belguim.⠀

#AfricanParks #AnnualReport #Restoration #NaturesReturn #Nkhotakota #Malawi


0

Brilliant (and adorably fluffy!) news all the way from Liwonde National Park in Malawi. The best kind of news for a Monday!

#Repost @africanparksnetwork with @get_repost
・・・
Watch: We’ve had a rare sighting of the first wild cheetah cubs to the born in Malawi in 20 years - and are pleased to share that they are doing well! Although it is uncommon to catch a glimpse of them at such a young age, as mum keeps them well hidden and away from predators, we were lucky enough capture these furballs on camera. African Parks and the @endangeredwildlifetrust (EWT) made history in May 2017, when a small founder population of cheetahs was successfully relocated to Liwonde National Park in Malawi, restoring the population of this threatened species at least 20 years after its extinction in the country. The birth of these four cubs, the first in the wild in Malawi in over 20 years, is a conservation milestone, and a positive indicator of how these cheetahs have adapted to their new home. The cheetah population in Liwonde, although small, has grown in just the last year to at least 15, and is part of a larger predator-restoration project for the park, and region. Keep up to date with this remarkable story and other exciting advancements by signing up for updates by clicking the link in our bio. #AfricanParks #BigCats #Liwonde #Malawi #naturesreturn #wildlife


8

#Repost @africanparksnetwork with @get_repost
・・・
Watch: We’ve had a rare sighting of the first wild cheetah cubs to the born in Malawi in 20 years - and are pleased to share that they are doing well! Although it is uncommon to catch a glimpse of them at such a young age, as mum keeps them well hidden and away from predators, we were lucky enough capture these furballs on camera. African Parks and the @endangeredwildlifetrust (EWT) made history in May 2017, when a small founder population of cheetahs was successfully relocated to Liwonde National Park in Malawi, restoring the population of this threatened species at least 20 years after its extinction in the country. The birth of these four cubs, the first in the wild in Malawi in over 20 years, is a conservation milestone, and a positive indicator of how these cheetahs have adapted to their new home. The cheetah population in Liwonde, although small, has grown in just the last year to at least 15, and is part of a larger predator-restoration project for the park, and region. Keep up to date with this remarkable story and other exciting advancements by signing up for updates by clicking the link in our bio. #AfricanParks #BigCats #Liwonde #Malawi #naturesreturn #wildlife


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#Repost @leonardodicaprio
• • •
#Regram #RG @africanparksnetwork: Nkhotakota Wildlife Reserve has had a difficult past. Decades of poaching and lawlessness saw a previously productive 1,800 km2 reserve with 1,500 elephants in the 1990’s reduced to fewer than 100 individuals. Game animals were hunted out. Nkhotakota had become an empty Reserve. With wildlife practically gone, there was no reason to visit Nkhotakota, no revenue, no productivity, and little to no value for the surrounding communities. But African Parks had a different vision for the most extensive remaining wild landscape in Malawi, one that included bringing it back to life. Upon assuming management in 2015, we immediately began preparing Nkhotakota for one of the world’s largest wildlife translocations. By August 2017, over a two-year period, the park received almost 500 elephants and 2,000 other animals. Poaching has been dramatically reduced through the presence of a well-trained and equipped ranger team, tourism has begun to increase, and the birth of new calves born in the park from the 2016 translocated elephants has already been documented. Extreme measures were taken to restore this landscape, and it was an extraordinary collaboration between the Government of Malawi, our donors and the team in Nkhotakota. It is early days, but in only two short years, already this park symbolises possibility and what nature can do with our help if only given the chance. Read the full story by clicking the link in the bio. 📷 @frankweitzer
_________________________________________⠀
Our work in Nkhotakota would not be possible without the support of our key partners: the DNPW, @postcodeloterij , @peoplespostcodelottery , Stichting Dioraphte, the Wyss Foundation and WWF-Belguim.⠀

#AfricanParks #AnnualReport #Restoration #NaturesReturn #Nkhotakota #Malawi#animals #conservation #elephant #africa #PlanetB #nature


0

#Repost @leonardodicaprio
• • •
#Regram #RG @africanparksnetwork: Nkhotakota Wildlife Reserve has had a difficult past. Decades of poaching and lawlessness saw a previously productive 1,800 km2 reserve with 1,500 elephants in the 1990’s reduced to fewer than 100 individuals. Game animals were hunted out. Nkhotakota had become an empty Reserve. With wildlife practically gone, there was no reason to visit Nkhotakota, no revenue, no productivity, and little to no value for the surrounding communities. But African Parks had a different vision for the most extensive remaining wild landscape in Malawi, one that included bringing it back to life. Upon assuming management in 2015, we immediately began preparing Nkhotakota for one of the world’s largest wildlife translocations. By August 2017, over a two-year period, the park received almost 500 elephants and 2,000 other animals. Poaching has been dramatically reduced through the presence of a well-trained and equipped ranger team, tourism has begun to increase, and the birth of new calves born in the park from the 2016 translocated elephants has already been documented. Extreme measures were taken to restore this landscape, and it was an extraordinary collaboration between the Government of Malawi, our donors and the team in Nkhotakota. It is early days, but in only two short years, already this park symbolises possibility and what nature can do with our help if only given the chance. Read the full story by clicking the link in the bio. 📷 @frankweitzer
_________________________________________⠀
Our work in Nkhotakota would not be possible without the support of our key partners: the DNPW, @postcodeloterij , @peoplespostcodelottery , Stichting Dioraphte, the Wyss Foundation and WWF-Belguim.⠀

#AfricanParks #AnnualReport #Restoration #NaturesReturn #Nkhotakota #Malawi


0

Watch: We’ve had a rare sighting of the first wild cheetah cubs to be born in Malawi in 20 years - and are pleased to share that they are doing well! Although it is uncommon to catch a glimpse of them at such a young age, as mum keeps them well hidden and away from predators, we were lucky enough to capture these furballs on camera. African Parks and the @endangeredwildlifetrust (EWT) made history in May 2017, when a small founder population of cheetahs was successfully relocated to Liwonde National Park in Malawi, restoring the population of this threatened species at least 20 years after its extinction in the country. The birth of these four cubs, the first in the wild in Malawi in over 20 years, is a conservation milestone, and a positive indicator of how these cheetahs have adapted to their new home. The cheetah population in Liwonde, although small, has grown in just the last year to at least 15, and is part of a larger predator-restoration project for the park, and region. Keep up to date with this remarkable story and other exciting advancements by signing up for updates by clicking the link in our bio. #AfricanParks #BigCats #Liwonde #Malawi #naturesreturn #wildlife


123

#Repost @leonardodicaprio with @get_repost
・・・
#Regram #RG @africanparksnetwork: Nkhotakota Wildlife Reserve has had a difficult past. Decades of poaching and lawlessness saw a previously productive 1,800 km2 reserve with 1,500 elephants in the 1990’s reduced to fewer than 100 individuals. Game animals were hunted out. Nkhotakota had become an empty Reserve. With wildlife practically gone, there was no reason to visit Nkhotakota, no revenue, no productivity, and little to no value for the surrounding communities. But African Parks had a different vision for the most extensive remaining wild landscape in Malawi, one that included bringing it back to life. Upon assuming management in 2015, we immediately began preparing Nkhotakota for one of the world’s largest wildlife translocations. By August 2017, over a two-year period, the park received almost 500 elephants and 2,000 other animals. Poaching has been dramatically reduced through the presence of a well-trained and equipped ranger team, tourism has begun to increase, and the birth of new calves born in the park from the 2016 translocated elephants has already been documented. Extreme measures were taken to restore this landscape, and it was an extraordinary collaboration between the Government of Malawi, our donors and the team in Nkhotakota. It is early days, but in only two short years, already this park symbolises possibility and what nature can do with our help if only given the chance. Read the full story by clicking the link in the bio. 📷 @frankweitzer
_________________________________________⠀
Our work in Nkhotakota would not be possible without the support of our key partners: the DNPW, @postcodeloterij , @peoplespostcodelottery , Stichting Dioraphte, the Wyss Foundation and WWF-Belguim.⠀

#AfricanParks #AnnualReport #Restoration #NaturesReturn #Nkhotakota #Malawi


0

Il commercio dell'avorio e la deforestazione stanno portando l'elefante all'estinzione. Si calcola che circa 20.000 elefanti africani siano uccisi dai bracconieri ogni anno.
Quando nel 1989 venne chiuso il mercato internazionale dell’avorio si sperò che finalmente questa tratta incivile potesse essere fermata; purtroppo si trattò solo di una pausa. Infatti, nel 2007, 4 Paesi africani (Sudafrica, Namibia, Botswana e Zimbabwe) ottennero dalla Cites, l’organizzazione che regola il mercato mondiale dei prodotti di specie a rischio, la possibilità di vendere alla Cina l’avorio cosiddetto “legale”, ovvero gli stock accumulati durante i vent’anni della moratoria. Questo permesso diede il via libero ai bracconieri e allo sviluppo di un mercato nero dell’avorio, oggi tra le cause principali della scomparsa di questo antico animale.

Lo stesso vale per l’Asia ma con una piccola differenza: sono solo gli elefanti maschi ad avere le zanne d’avorio. La loro caccia e conseguente abbattimento genera anche un’alterazione demografica nelle popolazioni di elefanti. In alcune riserve è rimasto solo un maschio adulto per ogni cento femmine, e di conseguenza meno di un terzo delle femmine adulte è accompagnata da un piccolo.

Negli ultimi anni si è aggiunto un’ulteriore forma di bracconaggio, molto più devastante e organizzata, legata alle guerriglie e bande armate che utilizzano strumenti tecnologici e armi micidiali per sterminare gli elefanti e finanziare con la vendita dell’avorio le guerre locali.

La seconda minaccia è la deforestazione. Gran parte degli habitat degli elefanti si estende ancora al di fuori delle aree protette, ma il rapido aumento della popolazione umana e l’estensione dell’agricoltura rendono ogni anno più inagibili zone appartenute da sempre a questi splendidi mammiferi che ora sono in via di estinzione. #elephant #naturesreturn #africanparks #savetheanimals #asiananimals #africananimals


6

Regrann from @leonardodicaprio - #Regram #RG @africanparksnetwork: Nkhotakota Wildlife Reserve has had a difficult past. Decades of poaching and lawlessness saw a previously productive 1,800 km2 reserve with 1,500 elephants in the 1990’s reduced to fewer than 100 individuals. Game animals were hunted out. Nkhotakota had become an empty Reserve. With wildlife practically gone, there was no reason to visit Nkhotakota, no revenue, no productivity, and little to no value for the surrounding communities. But African Parks had a different vision for the most extensive remaining wild landscape in Malawi, one that included bringing it back to life. Upon assuming management in 2015, we immediately began preparing Nkhotakota for one of the world’s largest wildlife translocations. By August 2017, over a two-year period, the park received almost 500 elephants and 2,000 other animals. Poaching has been dramatically reduced through the presence of a well-trained and equipped ranger team, tourism has begun to increase, and the birth of new calves born in the park from the 2016 translocated elephants has already been documented. Extreme measures were taken to restore this landscape, and it was an extraordinary collaboration between the Government of Malawi, our donors and the team in Nkhotakota. It is early days, but in only two short years, already this park symbolises possibility and what nature can do with our help if only given the chance. Read the full story by clicking the link in the bio. 📷 @frankweitzer
_________________________________________⠀
Our work in Nkhotakota would not be possible without the support of our key partners: the DNPW, @postcodeloterij , @peoplespostcodelottery , Stichting Dioraphte, the Wyss Foundation and WWF-Belguim.⠀

#AfricanParks #AnnualReport #Restoration #NaturesReturn #Nkhotakota #Malawi ⠀ - #regrann


0

#Repost @leonardodicaprio
• • • • •
#Regram #RG @africanparksnetwork: Nkhotakota Wildlife Reserve has had a difficult past. Decades of poaching and lawlessness saw a previously productive 1,800 km2 reserve with 1,500 elephants in the 1990’s reduced to fewer than 100 individuals. Game animals were hunted out. Nkhotakota had become an empty Reserve. With wildlife practically gone, there was no reason to visit Nkhotakota, no revenue, no productivity, and little to no value for the surrounding communities. But African Parks had a different vision for the most extensive remaining wild landscape in Malawi, one that included bringing it back to life. Upon assuming management in 2015, we immediately began preparing Nkhotakota for one of the world’s largest wildlife translocations. By August 2017, over a two-year period, the park received almost 500 elephants and 2,000 other animals. Poaching has been dramatically reduced through the presence of a well-trained and equipped ranger team, tourism has begun to increase, and the birth of new calves born in the park from the 2016 translocated elephants has already been documented. Extreme measures were taken to restore this landscape, and it was an extraordinary collaboration between the Government of Malawi, our donors and the team in Nkhotakota. It is early days, but in only two short years, already this park symbolises possibility and what nature can do with our help if only given the chance. Read the full story by clicking the link in the bio. 📷 @frankweitzer
_________________________________________⠀
Our work in Nkhotakota would not be possible without the support of our key partners: the DNPW, @postcodeloterij , @peoplespostcodelottery , Stichting Dioraphte, the Wyss Foundation and WWF-Belguim.⠀

#AfricanParks #AnnualReport #Restoration #NaturesReturn #Nkhotakota #Malawi


0

@leonardodicaprio
• • •
#Regram #RG @africanparksnetwork: Nkhotakota Wildlife Reserve has had a difficult past. Decades of poaching and lawlessness saw a previously productive 1,800 km2 reserve with 1,500 elephants in the 1990’s reduced to fewer than 100 individuals. Game animals were hunted out. Nkhotakota had become an empty Reserve. With wildlife practically gone, there was no reason to visit Nkhotakota, no revenue, no productivity, and little to no value for the surrounding communities. But African Parks had a different vision for the most extensive remaining wild landscape in Malawi, one that included bringing it back to life. Upon assuming management in 2015, we immediately began preparing Nkhotakota for one of the world’s largest wildlife translocations. By August 2017, over a two-year period, the park received almost 500 elephants and 2,000 other animals. Poaching has been dramatically reduced through the presence of a well-trained and equipped ranger team, tourism has begun to increase, and the birth of new calves born in the park from the 2016 translocated elephants has already been documented. Extreme measures were taken to restore this landscape, and it was an extraordinary collaboration between the Government of Malawi, our donors and the team in Nkhotakota. It is early days, but in only two short years, already this park symbolises possibility and what nature can do with our help if only given the chance. Read the full story by clicking the link in the bio. 📷 @frankweitzer
_________________________________________⠀
Our work in Nkhotakota would not be possible without the support of our key partners: the DNPW, @postcodeloterij , @peoplespostcodelottery , Stichting Dioraphte, the Wyss Foundation and WWF-Belguim.⠀

#AfricanParks #AnnualReport #Restoration #NaturesReturn #Nkhotakota #Malawi#leonardodicaprio


1

#Regram #RG @africanparksnetwork: Nkhotakota Wildlife Reserve has had a difficult past. Decades of poaching and lawlessness saw a previously productive 1,800 km2 reserve with 1,500 elephants in the 1990’s reduced to fewer than 100 individuals. Game animals were hunted out. Nkhotakota had become an empty Reserve. With wildlife practically gone, there was no reason to visit Nkhotakota, no revenue, no productivity, and little to no value for the surrounding communities. But African Parks had a different vision for the most extensive remaining wild landscape in Malawi, one that included bringing it back to life. Upon assuming management in 2015, we immediately began preparing Nkhotakota for one of the world’s largest wildlife translocations. By August 2017, over a two-year period, the park received almost 500 elephants and 2,000 other animals. Poaching has been dramatically reduced through the presence of a well-trained and equipped ranger team, tourism has begun to increase, and the birth of new calves born in the park from the 2016 translocated elephants has already been documented. Extreme measures were taken to restore this landscape, and it was an extraordinary collaboration between the Government of Malawi, our donors and the team in Nkhotakota. It is early days, but in only two short years, already this park symbolises possibility and what nature can do with our help if only given the chance. Read the full story by clicking the link in the bio. 📷 @frankweitzer
_________________________________________⠀
Our work in Nkhotakota would not be possible without the support of our key partners: the DNPW, @postcodeloterij , @peoplespostcodelottery , Stichting Dioraphte, the Wyss Foundation and WWF-Belguim.⠀

#AfricanParks #AnnualReport #Restoration #NaturesReturn #Nkhotakota #Malawi@nrt_kenya @lewa_wildlife @conservationorg @tusk_org @kenyawildlifeservice @sandiegozoo @natgeo @natgeocreative @thephotosociety #elephant #saveelephants #reteti #stoppoaching #kenya #northernkenya #magicalkenya #whiilovekenya #africa #everydayafrica #photojournalism #amivitale


0

Regrann from @leonardodicaprio - #Regram #RG @africanparksnetwork: Nkhotakota Wildlife Reserve has had a difficult past. Decades of poaching and lawlessness saw a previously productive 1,800 km2 reserve with 1,500 elephants in the 1990’s reduced to fewer than 100 individuals. Game animals were hunted out. Nkhotakota had become an empty Reserve. With wildlife practically gone, there was no reason to visit Nkhotakota, no revenue, no productivity, and little to no value for the surrounding communities. But African Parks had a different vision for the most extensive remaining wild landscape in Malawi, one that included bringing it back to life. Upon assuming management in 2015, we immediately began preparing Nkhotakota for one of the world’s largest wildlife translocations. By August 2017, over a two-year period, the park received almost 500 elephants and 2,000 other animals. Poaching has been dramatically reduced through the presence of a well-trained and equipped ranger team, tourism has begun to increase, and the birth of new calves born in the park from the 2016 translocated elephants has already been documented. Extreme measures were taken to restore this landscape, and it was an extraordinary collaboration between the Government of Malawi, our donors and the team in Nkhotakota. It is early days, but in only two short years, already this park symbolises possibility and what nature can do with our help if only given the chance. Read the full story by clicking the link in the bio. 📷 @frankweitzer
_________________________________________⠀
Our work in Nkhotakota would not be possible without the support of our key partners: the DNPW, @postcodeloterij , @peoplespostcodelottery , Stichting Dioraphte, the Wyss Foundation and WWF-Belguim.⠀

#AfricanParks #AnnualReport #Restoration #NaturesReturn #Nkhotakota #Malawi


0

Regrann from @leonardodicaprio - #Regram #RG @africanparksnetwork: Nkhotakota Wildlife Reserve has had a difficult past. Decades of poaching and lawlessness saw a previously productive 1,800 km2 reserve with 1,500 elephants in the 1990’s reduced to fewer than 100 individuals. Game animals were hunted out. Nkhotakota had become an empty Reserve. With wildlife practically gone, there was no reason to visit Nkhotakota, no revenue, no productivity, and little to no value for the surrounding communities. But African Parks had a different vision for the most extensive remaining wild landscape in Malawi, one that included bringing it back to life. Upon assuming management in 2015, we immediately began preparing Nkhotakota for one of the world’s largest wildlife translocations. By August 2017, over a two-year period, the park received almost 500 elephants and 2,000 other animals. Poaching has been dramatically reduced through the presence of a well-trained and equipped ranger team, tourism has begun to increase, and the birth of new calves born in the park from the 2016 translocated elephants has already been documented. Extreme measures were taken to restore this landscape, and it was an extraordinary collaboration between the Government of Malawi, our donors and the team in Nkhotakota. It is early days, but in only two short years, already this park symbolises possibility and what nature can do with our help if only given the chance. Read the full story by clicking the link in the bio. 📷 @frankweitzer
_________________________________________⠀
Our work in Nkhotakota would not be possible without the support of our key partners: the DNPW, @postcodeloterij , @peoplespostcodelottery , Stichting Dioraphte, the Wyss Foundation and WWF-Belguim.⠀

#AfricanParks #AnnualReport #Restoration #NaturesReturn #Nkhotakota #Malawi ⠀ - #regrann


0

#Regram #RG @africanparksnetwork: Nkhotakota Wildlife Reserve has had a difficult past. Decades of poaching and lawlessness saw a previously productive 1,800 km2 reserve with 1,500 elephants in the 1990’s reduced to fewer than 100 individuals. Game animals were hunted out. Nkhotakota had become an empty Reserve. With wildlife practically gone, there was no reason to visit Nkhotakota, no revenue, no productivity, and little to no value for the surrounding communities. But African Parks had a different vision for the most extensive remaining wild landscape in Malawi, one that included bringing it back to life. Upon assuming management in 2015, we immediately began preparing Nkhotakota for one of the world’s largest wildlife translocations. By August 2017, over a two-year period, the park received almost 500 elephants and 2,000 other animals. Poaching has been dramatically reduced through the presence of a well-trained and equipped ranger team, tourism has begun to increase, and the birth of new calves born in the park from the 2016 translocated elephants has already been documented. Extreme measures were taken to restore this landscape, and it was an extraordinary collaboration between the Government of Malawi, our donors and the team in Nkhotakota. It is early days, but in only two short years, already this park symbolises possibility and what nature can do with our help if only given the chance. Read the full story by clicking the link in the bio. 📷 @frankweitzer
_________________________________________⠀
Our work in Nkhotakota would not be possible without the support of our key partners: the DNPW, @postcodeloterij , @peoplespostcodelottery , Stichting Dioraphte, the Wyss Foundation and WWF-Belguim.⠀

#AfricanParks #AnnualReport #Restoration #NaturesReturn #Nkhotakota #Malawi


0

repost via @instarepost20 from @leonardodicaprio #Regram #RG @africanparksnetwork: Nkhotakota Wildlife Reserve has had a difficult past. Decades of poaching and lawlessness saw a previously productive 1,800 km2 reserve with 1,500 elephants in the 1990’s reduced to fewer than 100 individuals. Game animals were hunted out. Nkhotakota had become an empty Reserve. With wildlife practically gone, there was no reason to visit Nkhotakota, no revenue, no productivity, and little to no value for the surrounding communities. But African Parks had a different vision for the most extensive remaining wild landscape in Malawi, one that included bringing it back to life. Upon assuming management in 2015, we immediately began preparing Nkhotakota for one of the world’s largest wildlife translocations. By August 2017, over a two-year period, the park received almost 500 elephants and 2,000 other animals. Poaching has been dramatically reduced through the presence of a well-trained and equipped ranger team, tourism has begun to increase, and the birth of new calves born in the park from the 2016 translocated elephants has already been documented. Extreme measures were taken to restore this landscape, and it was an extraordinary collaboration between the Government of Malawi, our donors and the team in Nkhotakota. It is early days, but in only two short years, already this park symbolises possibility and what nature can do with our help if only given the chance. Read the full story by clicking the link in the bio. 📷 @frankweitzer
_________________________________________⠀
Our work in Nkhotakota would not be possible without the support of our key partners: the DNPW, @postcodeloterij , @peoplespostcodelottery , Stichting Dioraphte, the Wyss Foundation and WWF-Belguim.⠀

#AfricanParks #AnnualReport #Restoration #NaturesReturn #Nkhotakota #Malawi


0

#Regram #RG @africanparksnetwork: Nkhotakota Wildlife Reserve has had a difficult past. Decades of poaching and lawlessness saw a previously productive 1,800 km2 reserve with 1,500 elephants in the 1990’s reduced to fewer than 100 individuals. Game animals were hunted out. Nkhotakota had become an empty Reserve. With wildlife practically gone, there was no reason to visit Nkhotakota, no revenue, no productivity, and little to no value for the surrounding communities. But African Parks had a different vision for the most extensive remaining wild landscape in Malawi, one that included bringing it back to life. Upon assuming management in 2015, we immediately began preparing Nkhotakota for one of the world’s largest wildlife translocations. By August 2017, over a two-year period, the park received almost 500 elephants and 2,000 other animals. Poaching has been dramatically reduced through the presence of a well-trained and equipped ranger team, tourism has begun to increase, and the birth of new calves born in the park from the 2016 translocated elephants has already been documented. Extreme measures were taken to restore this landscape, and it was an extraordinary collaboration between the Government of Malawi, our donors and the team in Nkhotakota. It is early days, but in only two short years, already this park symbolises possibility and what nature can do with our help if only given the chance. Read the full story by clicking the link in the bio. 📷 @frankweitzer
_________________________________________⠀
Our work in Nkhotakota would not be possible without the support of our key partners: the DNPW, @postcodeloterij , @peoplespostcodelottery , Stichting Dioraphte, the Wyss Foundation and WWF-Belguim.⠀

#AfricanParks #AnnualReport #Restoration #NaturesReturn #Nkhotakota #Malawi


0

#Repost from @leonardodicaprio with @regram.app ... #Regram #RG @africanparksnetwork: Nkhotakota Wildlife Reserve has had a difficult past. Decades of poaching and lawlessness saw a previously productive 1,800 km2 reserve with 1,500 elephants in the 1990’s reduced to fewer than 100 individuals. Game animals were hunted out. Nkhotakota had become an empty Reserve. With wildlife practically gone, there was no reason to visit Nkhotakota, no revenue, no productivity, and little to no value for the surrounding communities. But African Parks had a different vision for the most extensive remaining wild landscape in Malawi, one that included bringing it back to life. Upon assuming management in 2015, we immediately began preparing Nkhotakota for one of the world’s largest wildlife translocations. By August 2017, over a two-year period, the park received almost 500 elephants and 2,000 other animals. Poaching has been dramatically reduced through the presence of a well-trained and equipped ranger team, tourism has begun to increase, and the birth of new calves born in the park from the 2016 translocated elephants has already been documented. Extreme measures were taken to restore this landscape, and it was an extraordinary collaboration between the Government of Malawi, our donors and the team in Nkhotakota. It is early days, but in only two short years, already this park symbolises possibility and what nature can do with our help if only given the chance. Read the full story by clicking the link in the bio. 📷 @frankweitzer
_________________________________________⠀
Our work in Nkhotakota would not be possible without the support of our key partners: the DNPW, @postcodeloterij , @peoplespostcodelottery , Stichting Dioraphte, the Wyss Foundation and WWF-Belguim.⠀

#AfricanParks #AnnualReport #Restoration #NaturesReturn #Nkhotakota #Malawi


0

#Repost @leonardodicaprio
・・・
#Regram #RG @africanparksnetwork: Nkhotakota Wildlife Reserve has had a difficult past. Decades of poaching and lawlessness saw a previously productive 1,800 km2 reserve with 1,500 elephants in the 1990’s reduced to fewer than 100 individuals. Game animals were hunted out. Nkhotakota had become an empty Reserve. With wildlife practically gone, there was no reason to visit Nkhotakota, no revenue, no productivity, and little to no value for the surrounding communities. But African Parks had a different vision for the most extensive remaining wild landscape in Malawi, one that included bringing it back to life. Upon assuming management in 2015, we immediately began preparing Nkhotakota for one of the world’s largest wildlife translocations. By August 2017, over a two-year period, the park received almost 500 elephants and 2,000 other animals. Poaching has been dramatically reduced through the presence of a well-trained and equipped ranger team, tourism has begun to increase, and the birth of new calves born in the park from the 2016 translocated elephants has already been documented. Extreme measures were taken to restore this landscape, and it was an extraordinary collaboration between the Government of Malawi, our donors and the team in Nkhotakota. It is early days, but in only two short years, already this park symbolises possibility and what nature can do with our help if only given the chance. Read the full story by clicking the link in the bio. 📷 @frankweitzer
_________________________________________⠀
Our work in Nkhotakota would not be possible without the support of our key partners: the DNPW, @postcodeloterij , @peoplespostcodelottery , Stichting Dioraphte, the Wyss Foundation and WWF-Belguim.⠀

#AfricanParks #AnnualReport #Restoration #NaturesReturn #Nkhotakota #Malawi
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0

#Repost @leonardodicaprio with @get_repost
・・・
#Regram #RG @africanparksnetwork: Nkhotakota Wildlife Reserve has had a difficult past. Decades of poaching and lawlessness saw a previously productive 1,800 km2 reserve with 1,500 elephants in the 1990’s reduced to fewer than 100 individuals. Game animals were hunted out. Nkhotakota had become an empty Reserve. With wildlife practically gone, there was no reason to visit Nkhotakota, no revenue, no productivity, and little to no value for the surrounding communities. But African Parks had a different vision for the most extensive remaining wild landscape in Malawi, one that included bringing it back to life. Upon assuming management in 2015, we immediately began preparing Nkhotakota for one of the world’s largest wildlife translocations. By August 2017, over a two-year period, the park received almost 500 elephants and 2,000 other animals. Poaching has been dramatically reduced through the presence of a well-trained and equipped ranger team, tourism has begun to increase, and the birth of new calves born in the park from the 2016 translocated elephants has already been documented. Extreme measures were taken to restore this landscape, and it was an extraordinary collaboration between the Government of Malawi, our donors and the team in Nkhotakota. It is early days, but in only two short years, already this park symbolises possibility and what nature can do with our help if only given the chance. Read the full story by clicking the link in the bio. 📷 @frankweitzer
_________________________________________⠀
Our work in Nkhotakota would not be possible without the support of our key partners: the DNPW, @postcodeloterij , @peoplespostcodelottery , Stichting Dioraphte, the Wyss Foundation and WWF-Belguim.⠀

#AfricanParks #AnnualReport #Restoration #NaturesReturn #Nkhotakota #Malawi


0

#Regram #RG @africanparksnetwork: Nkhotakota Wildlife Reserve has had a difficult past. Decades of poaching and lawlessness saw a previously productive 1,800 km2 reserve with 1,500 elephants in the 1990’s reduced to fewer than 100 individuals. Game animals were hunted out. Nkhotakota had become an empty Reserve. With wildlife practically gone, there was no reason to visit Nkhotakota, no revenue, no productivity, and little to no value for the surrounding communities. But African Parks had a different vision for the most extensive remaining wild landscape in Malawi, one that included bringing it back to life. Upon assuming management in 2015, we immediately began preparing Nkhotakota for one of the world’s largest wildlife translocations. By August 2017, over a two-year period, the park received almost 500 elephants and 2,000 other animals. Poaching has been dramatically reduced through the presence of a well-trained and equipped ranger team, tourism has begun to increase, and the birth of new calves born in the park from the 2016 translocated elephants has already been documented. Extreme measures were taken to restore this landscape, and it was an extraordinary collaboration between the Government of Malawi, our donors and the team in Nkhotakota. It is early days, but in only two short years, already this park symbolises possibility and what nature can do with our help if only given the chance. Read the full story by clicking the link in the bio. 📷 @frankweitzer
_________________________________________⠀
Our work in Nkhotakota would not be possible without the support of our key partners: the DNPW, @postcodeloterij , @peoplespostcodelottery , Stichting Dioraphte, the Wyss Foundation and WWF-Belguim.⠀

#AfricanParks #AnnualReport #Restoration #NaturesReturn #Nkhotakota #Malawi


1,432

Pendjari National Park is one of the most recent parks and the first within West Africa
to fall under our management. It is situated in the northwest of Benin and measures 4,800 km2, and is an anchoring part of the transnational W-Arly-Pendjari (WAP) complex, spanning a vast 35,000 km2 across three countries: Benin, Burkina Faso and Niger. This is the largest remaining intact ecosystem in the whole of West Africa and the last refuge for the region's largest remaining population of elephants and the critically endangered West African lion, of which fewer than 400 adults remain and 100 live in Pendjari. Pendjari is also home to cheetahs, various antelope species, buffalo, and more than 460 avian species, and is an important wetland. But this globally significant reserve has been facing major threats, including poaching, demographic pressure on surrounding land, and exponential resource erosion. But the Benin Government wanted to change this trajectory and chart a different path for this critically important landscape within their borders. In May 2017, African Parks signed a 10-year management mandate, and forged a ground-breaking partnership. Thanks to the progressiveness of the Benin Government, a lifeline was thrown to this little-known but globally important protected area. Read the full story by clicking the link in the bio 📷 @jonas_vandevoorde
Our work in Pendjari would not be possible without the support of our key partners: the Government of Benin, the @natgeo Society, The Wyss Foundation and the Wildcat Foundation.
#AfricanParks #AnnualReport #Restoration #NaturesReturn #Pendjari #Benin #revealingbenin


18

©️ #Repost @africanparksnetwork
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Situated in Malawi, the ‘warm heart of Africa,’ Liwonde National Park has been the home of incredible wildlife translocations and reintroductions. When African Parks assumed management of Liwonde, in partnership with the Department of National Parks and Wildlife (DNPW) in 2015, the park was riddled with tens of thousands of wire snares – more snares existed than large animals – and it had some of the highest human-wildlife conflict levels in the region. People were killing everything in the park, and tragically were also being killed by elephants and crocodiles. It was lawless and fraught with challenges. African Parks immediately began constructing an electric fence to keep wildlife inside the park. Just one year later, Liwonde was at the epicentre of one of the largest elephant translocations in history, through which a total of 336 elephants were relocated to Nkhotakota Wildlife Reserve, reducing pressure on Liwonde’s natural habitats while helping to solve the deadly conflict situation. Since 2015, over 31,000 snares have been removed, and poaching is now under control. After restoring security, cheetahs were reintroduced in 2017, bringing the species back to the park after 100 years, and lion reintroductions have been taking place in 2018. Wildlife populations are on the rise, and so is the number of people who are coming to the park to marvel at the revival. The number of tourists is up 25% and revenue has increased by 70 % since 2016. In just two short years, Liwonde has been given a second chance, and it is being restored and transformed, right before our very eyes. Read the full story by clicking the link in the bio. Photo @frankweitzer
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Our work in Liwonde would not be possible without the support of our key partners: the DNPW, @postcodeloterij, the Wyss Foundation and WWF-Belguim
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#AfricanParks #AnnualReport #Restoration #NaturesReturn #Malawi #Liwonde #Elephant #Travel #visit2malawi #travel_malawi


3

Nkhotakota Wildlife Reserve has had a difficult past. Decades of poaching and lawlessness saw a previously productive 1,800 km2 reserve with 1,500 elephants in the 1990’s reduced to fewer than 100 individuals. Game animals were hunted out. Nkhotakota had become an empty Reserve. With wildlife practically gone, there was no reason to visit Nkhotakota, no revenue, no productivity, and little to no value for the surrounding communities. But African Parks had a different vision for the most extensive remaining wild landscape in Malawi, one that included bringing it back to life. Upon assuming management in 2015, we immediately began preparing Nkhotakota for one of the world’s largest wildlife translocations. By August 2017, over a two-year period, the park received almost 500 elephants and 2,000 other animals. Poaching has been dramatically reduced through the presence of a well-trained and equipped ranger team, tourism has begun to increase, and the birth of new calves born in the park from the 2016 translocated elephants has already been documented. Extreme measures were taken to restore this landscape, and it was an extraordinary collaboration between the Government of Malawi, our donors and the team in Nkhotakota. It is early days, but in only two short years, already this park symbolises possibility and what nature can do with our help if only given the chance. Read the full story by clicking the link in the bio. 📷 @frankweitzer
_________________________________________⠀
Our work in Nkhotakota would not be possible without the support of our key partners: the DNPW, @postcodeloterij , @peoplespostcodelottery , Stichting Dioraphte, the Wyss Foundation and WWF-Belguim.⠀

#AfricanParks #AnnualReport #Restoration #NaturesReturn #Nkhotakota #Malawi


14

#Repost @africanparksnetwork (@get_repost)
・・・ Situated in Malawi, the ‘warm heart of Africa,’ Liwonde National Park has been the home of incredible wildlife translocations and reintroductions. When African Parks assumed management of Liwonde, in partnership with the Department of National Parks and Wildlife (DNPW) in 2015, the park was riddled with tens of thousands of wire snares – more snares existed than large animals – and it had some of the highest human-wildlife conflict levels in the region. People were killing everything in the park, and tragically were also being killed by elephants and crocodiles. It was lawless and fraught with challenges. African Parks immediately began constructing an electric fence to keep wildlife inside the park. Just one year later, Liwonde was at the epicentre of one of the largest elephant translocations in history, through which a total of 336 elephants were relocated to Nkhotakota Wildlife Reserve, reducing pressure on Liwonde’s natural habitats while helping to solve the deadly conflict situation. Since 2015, over 31,000 snares have been removed, and poaching is now under control. After restoring security, cheetahs were reintroduced in 2017, bringing the species back to the park after 100 years, and lion reintroductions have been taking place in 2018. Wildlife populations are on the rise, and so is the number of people who are coming to the park to marvel at the revival. The number of tourists is up 25% and revenue has increased by 70 % since 2016. In just two short years, Liwonde has been given a second chance, and it is being restored and transformed, right before our very eyes. Read the full story by clicking the link in the bio. Photo Frank Weitzer ⠀
_______________⠀
Our work in Liwonde would not be possible without the support of our key partners: the DNPW, @postcodeloterij, the Wyss Foundation and WWF-Belguim. #AfricanParks #AnnualReport #Restoration #NaturesReturn #Malawi #Liwonde #Elephant #Travel


0

Situated in Malawi, the ‘warm heart of Africa,’ Liwonde National Park has been the home of incredible wildlife translocations and reintroductions. When African Parks assumed management of Liwonde, in partnership with the Department of National Parks and Wildlife (DNPW) in 2015, the park was riddled with tens of thousands of wire snares – more snares existed than large animals – and it had some of the highest human-wildlife conflict levels in the region. People were killing everything in the park, and tragically were also being killed by elephants and crocodiles. It was lawless and fraught with challenges. African Parks immediately began constructing an electric fence to keep wildlife inside the park. Just one year later, Liwonde was at the epicentre of one of the largest elephant translocations in history, through which a total of 336 elephants were relocated to Nkhotakota Wildlife Reserve, reducing pressure on Liwonde’s natural habitats while helping to solve the deadly conflict situation. Since 2015, over 31,000 snares have been removed, and poaching is now under control. After restoring security, cheetahs were reintroduced in 2017, bringing the species back to the park after 100 years, and lion reintroductions have been taking place in 2018. Wildlife populations are on the rise, and so is the number of people who are coming to the park to marvel at the revival. The number of tourists is up 25% and revenue has increased by 70 % since 2016. In just two short years, Liwonde has been given a second chance, and it is being restored and transformed, right before our very eyes. Read the full story by clicking the link in the bio. Photo @frankweitzer
_______________⠀
Our work in Liwonde would not be possible without the support of our key partners: the DNPW, @postcodeloterij, the Wyss Foundation and WWF-Belguim. #AfricanParks #AnnualReport #Restoration #NaturesReturn #Malawi #Liwonde #Elephant #Travel


23

African Parks’ 2017 annual report was published recently. We are all quite proud of our team’s achievements this past year and whilst we are dedicated to wildlife conservation, Chinko has also been a safe haven for around 300 Internally Displaced People (IDPs) who fled the violence in neigboring villages. After more than a year in Chinko - protected by our Rangers - and many negotiations later, these people have finally found their way back home. In restoring security, Chinko is dedicated to becoming a true pillar of stability in eastern CAR for wildlife and people alike. Click the link in bio to read the full report. #chinko #africanparks #beinspired #conservation #community #development #annualreport #restoration #dedication #naturesreturn #centralafricanrepublic 📷 @eve_damas


3

Nestled within the eastern part of the Central African Republic (CAR) in a war-torn region plagued by instability and deadly ethnic violence, lies a wildlife refuge called @chinko.project . Despite decades of civil war, intense poaching, illegal grazing and heavily armed herdsmen, remnant populations of key species have persisted, and habitats remained intact, making this one of the largest ecosystems with the greatest conservation potential in all of Central Africa. ⠀
Over the year, thanks to effective law enforcement, our team managed to secure this 19,846 km2 landscape, keeping main threats at bay, and a 10,500 km2 area completely free of cattle. Prior to African Parks signing a 50-year mandate with the government in 2014, hundreds of thousands of cattle flooded the park. Today, they are only found on the boundary, and where they once grazed, herds of buffalo, hartebeest and hippos have taken their place. Lord Derby eland are on the rise, and nine more were collared in 2017. Increasing signs of lions and elephants are being documented, and animals are finding their way back into existence. And while wildlife is benefitting from the safe haven within the park's boundaries, so are people. A humanitarian crisis developed when more than 380 Internally Displaced People, mainly women and children, fled to Chinko – the only safe area – to prevent near-certain death, and were protected by the park and our rangers. In restoring security, Chinko has become a primary source of stability and safety in an entire region, for people and wildlife alike. Read the full story by clicking the link in the bio. ⠀
Our work in Chinko would not be possible without the support of our key partners: the Government of the CAR, European Union, Bêkou Trust Fund, Foundation Segré, The Walton Family Foundation, USAID and @usfws. 📷 @eve_damas
#AfricanParks #AnnualReport #Restoration #NaturesReturn #Chinko #CentralAfrica


17

@africanparksnetwork

Guards that are coming back from their 12 days in the field, protecting the park, meeting their friends or neighbors or family members that are also guards – getting ready to head out to the field. Communities protecting their park and all the animals!!!
Zakouma National Park in Chad is one of the most remarkable stories about transformation.

In 2010, African Parks, on invitation by the Chadian Government, signed a long-term agreement to manage Zakouma and stop the bloodshed. Our first step was to overhaul law enforcement, but it wasn’t for the faint of heart. In 2012, six of our rangers were gunned down execution-style during their morning prayers. But our rangers, with their indomitable spirits, didn’t give up. Because of their efforts and effective community work, only 24 known elephants have been lost to poaching since 2010. Along with providing law enforcement, we built ‘Elephant Schools’ for local communities, providing desks, blackboards and teachers’ salaries, helping more than 1,500 children get an education. We built airstrips, and VHF radios were installed so community members could contact our control room with information about any illegal activity. People were employed to help manage the park, making Zakouma one of the largest employers in the region. With law enforced and security reclaimed, tourists began to visit, delivering needed revenue back to the park and local communities. And then something miraculous happened. Elephants were able to be elephants once again, and for the first time in years, they began to breed and could raise their young. In early 2017, we counted 81 calves under the age of three. In 2011, we counted one. Elephants have now surpassed 527 individuals and are on the rise for the first time in a decade. We’ve come a long way since 2010. The story of Zakouma is of a park rising from the ashes and becoming an unlikely tale of redemption, for people and animals alike.

Our work in Zakouma would not be possible without the support of our partners: The Republic of Chad, the EU, Foundation Segré and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to name a few. #AfricanParks #AnnualReport#Restoration #NaturesReturn


54

@akagerapark in Rwanda is almost unrecognisable today compared to just 20 years ago when it was on the verge of being lost forever. While peace was finally restored in the 1990s after one of the bloodiest human events in the 20th century, Akagera’s demise was just beginning. Refugees returning to Rwanda after the genocide were still battling for their own survival and turned to the forests for timber, wildlife for protein and wild savannahs for their livestock. Lions were hunted to local extinction, rhinos disappeared, and the park’s wildlife was displaced by tens of thousands of long-horned cattle. Biodiversity was practically lost, and with it so was employment and tourism. The park’s value was diminished to the point of not existing at all. Which makes where Akagera is today with its story of revival even more remarkable.⠀
In 2010, @africanparksnetwork assumed management of Akagera in partnership with the Rwanda Development⠀
Board (RDB), shifting the park's trajectory from one of oblivion to prosperity and hope. After years of⠀
preparation, 2017 saw the historic return of 18 Eastern black rhinos after a 10-year absence, thanks to support from the Howard G. Buffett Foundation. Two new male lions were also translocated to the park to enhance the growing pride, which has now tripled since their reintroduction in 2015. Key wildlife populations continued to rise, with poaching essentially halted. And more than 37,000 tourists visited the park, half of whom were Rwandan nationals, bringing in a record US$1.6 million in revenue and making the park 75% self-sustaining in just seven years. Read the full story by clicking the link in the bio. 📷 @gael_rvw
_______________________⠀

Our work in Akagera would not be possible without the support of our partners: The Rwandan Development Board, the Dutch Ministry of Economic Affairs, the Government of Rwanda, The Howard G. Buffett Foundation, The Walton Family Foundation and the Wyss Foundation.⠀
#AfricanParks #AnnualReport #Restoration #NaturesReturn


39

#Regram #RG @africanparksnetwork: Nature is being restored across the 15 parks we currently manage across Africa. Our 2017 Annual Report features the range of interventions currently underway, from extreme species translocations and reintroductions to providing security to create safer spaces for both humans and wildlife. Over the next few weeks, we will be sharing the stories of these remarkable parks, starting with the first park we assumed management of in 2003, and one of our greatest conservation successes. Over just 14 years, Majete has transformed from a once-empty forest with no employment or tourism and only a few remaining antelope within its perimeter, to a productive and flourishing haven for Africa's most iconic wildlife, generating revenue and benefits for local communities. Decades of lawlessness and poaching had seen the reserve’s wildlife completely eradicated by the 1990s. This all changed in 2003, when African Parks assumed management of Majete, the first park to enter our portfolio. We immediately began to revive the park through a series of species reintroductions. Today, Majete is flourishing, so much so that wildlife is being moved to populate other parks and private reserves within the country. We've maintained a 14-year track record of zero poaching of rhinos and elephants since their introduction; and tourism has increased 14 percent from last year, with over 9,000 visitors, half of whom were Malawian nationals bringing in over US$550,000 to the reserve and communities. Majete is a tale of a park rising from the ashes – living proof of how a park deemed to be a wasteland can be revived and restored and serve as a life-source for wildlife and humans alike. Read the full story by clicking the link in the bio. Photo @pedromcbride
###
African Parks success and ability to restore these areas could not have been achieved without the support of our partners: the DNPW, The Wyss Foundation, @wwfbelgium , the @postcodeloterij and the @peoplespostcodelottery
#AfricanParks #AnnualReport #Restoration #NaturesReturn


0

-
▫️INTO▫️▫️THE ▫️▫️WILD ▫️

❓HOPE▫️FOR▫️THE▫️FUTURE❓

It’s great to report on GOOD NEWS on wildlife with organisations such as @africanparksnetwork who are delivering powerful results partnering with African governments and local communities.

‼️SLAUGHTER AND EXTINCTION‼️
.
‼️🦏🐘🦍CAN BE STOPPED🦍🐘🦏‼️

Their new President is HRH Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex a very astute appointment which will keep their work in the global spotlight!
.
They manage 15 African national parks and protected areas in nine countries covering 10.5 million hectares: Benin, Central African Republic, Chad, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Malawi, Mozambique, the Republic of Congo, Rwanda and Zambia.
.
The first park they assumed management of in 2003, and one of its greatest conservation successes, Majete in Malawi has been transformed to a productive and flourishing haven for Africa's most iconic wildlife, generating revenue and benefits for local communities.
.
Today, Majete is flourishing, so much so that wildlife is being moved to populate other parks and it has maintained a 14-year track record of ZERO POACHING of rhinos and elephants.
.
Majete is a tale of a park rising from the ashes – living proof of how a park deemed to be a wasteland can be revived and restored and serve as a life-source for wildlife and humans alike.

Photo @pedromcbrideb detail ( 6 of 6 )

#noēsis #AfricanParks #AnnualReport #Majete #Malawi #ecotourism #Restoration #Vietnam #China #Cambodia #USA #rhinopoaching #savetherhino #Ivory #saynotopoaching #elephant #savetheelephants #NaturesReturn #princeharry #dukeofsussex @kensingtonroyal #socialmediaforsocialgood #thegreenthread #activecitizens #bethechange #endextinction #savetheplanet #naturalbeauty #saynotoplastic


2

-
▫️INTO▫️▫️THE ▫️▫️WILD ▫️

❓HOPE▫️FOR▫️THE▫️FUTURE❓

It’s great to report on GOOD NEWS on wildlife with organisations such as @africanparksnetwork who are delivering powerful results partnering with African governments and local communities.

‼️SLAUGHTER AND EXTINCTION‼️
.
‼️🦏🐘🦍CAN BE STOPPED🦍🐘🦏‼️

African Parks new President is HRH Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex a very astute appointment which will keep their work in the global spotlight!
.
The African Parks manage 15 African national parks and protected areas in nine countries covering 10.5 million hectares: Benin, Central African Republic, Chad, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Malawi, Mozambique, the Republic of Congo, Rwanda and Zambia.
.
The first park they assumed management of in 2003, and one of its greatest conservation successes, Majete in Malawi has been transformed to a productive and flourishing haven for Africa's most iconic wildlife, generating revenue and benefits for local communities.
.
Today, Majete is flourishing, so much so that wildlife is being moved to populate other parks and it has maintained a 14-year track record of ZERO POACHING of rhinos and elephants.
.
Majete is a tale of a park rising from the ashes – living proof of how a park deemed to be a wasteland can be revived and restored and serve as a life-source for wildlife and humans alike.

Photo @pedromcbrideb detail ( 5 of 6 )

#noēsis #AfricanParks #AnnualReport #Majete #Malawi #ecotourism #Restoration #Vietnam #China #Cambodia #USA #rhinopoaching #savetherhino #Ivory #saynotopoaching #elephant #savetheelephants #NaturesReturn #princeharry #dukeofsussex @kensingtonroyal #socialmediaforsocialgood #thegreenthread #activecitizens #bethechange #endextinction #savetheplanet #naturalbeauty #saynotoplastic


1

-
▫️INTO▫️▫️THE ▫️▫️WILD ▫️

❓HOPE▫️FOR▫️THE▫️FUTURE❓

It’s great to report on GOOD NEWS on wildlife with organisations such as @africanparksnetwork who are delivering powerful results partnering with African governments and local communities.

‼️SLAUGHTER AND EXTINCTION‼️
.
‼️🦏🐘🦍CAN BE STOPPED🦍🐘🦏‼️

Their new President is HRH Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex a very astute appointment which will keep their work in the global spotlight!
.
They manage 15 African national parks and protected areas in nine countries covering 10.5 million hectares: Benin, Central African Republic, Chad, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Malawi, Mozambique, the Republic of Congo, Rwanda and Zambia.
.
The first park they assumed management of in 2003, and one of its greatest conservation successes, Majete in Malawi has been transformed to a productive and flourishing haven for Africa's most iconic wildlife, generating revenue and benefits for local communities.
.
Today, Majete is flourishing, so much so that wildlife is being moved to populate other parks and it has maintained a 14-year track record of ZERO POACHING of rhinos and elephants.
.
Majete is a tale of a park rising from the ashes – living proof of how a park deemed to be a wasteland can be revived and restored and serve as a life-source for wildlife and humans alike.

Photo @pedromcbrideb detail ( 4 of 6 )

#noēsis #AfricanParks #AnnualReport #Majete #Malawi #ecotourism #Restoration #Vietnam #China #Cambodia #USA #rhinopoaching #savetherhino #Ivory #saynotopoaching #elephant #savetheelephants #NaturesReturn #princeharry #dukeofsussex @kensingtonroyal #socialmediaforsocialgood #thegreenthread #activecitizens #bethechange #endextinction #savetheplanet #naturalbeauty #saynotoplastic


0

-
▫️INTO▫️▫️THE ▫️▫️WILD ▫️

❓HOPE▫️FOR▫️THE▫️FUTURE❓

It’s great to report on GOOD NEWS on wildlife with organisations such as @africanparksnetwork who are delivering powerful results partnering with African governments and local communities.

‼️SLAUGHTER AND EXTINCTION‼️
.
‼️🦏🐘🦍CAN BE STOPPED🦍🐘🦏‼️

Their new President is HRH Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex a very astute appointment which will keep their work in the global spotlight!
.
They manage 15 African national parks and protected areas in nine countries covering 10.5 million hectares: Benin, Central African Republic, Chad, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Malawi, Mozambique, the Republic of Congo, Rwanda and Zambia.
.
The first park they assumed management of in 2003, and one of its greatest conservation successes, Majete in Malawi has been transformed to a productive and flourishing haven for Africa's most iconic wildlife, generating revenue and benefits for local communities.
.
Today, Majete is flourishing, so much so that wildlife is being moved to populate other parks and it has maintained a 14-year track record of ZERO POACHING of rhinos and elephants.
.
Majete is a tale of a park rising from the ashes – living proof of how a park deemed to be a wasteland can be revived and restored and serve as a life-source for wildlife and humans alike.

Photo @pedromcbrideb detail ( 3 of 6 )

#noēsis #AfricanParks #AnnualReport #Majete #Malawi #ecotourism #Restoration #Vietnam #China #Cambodia #USA #rhinopoaching #savetherhino #Ivory #saynotopoaching #elephant #savetheelephants #NaturesReturn #princeharry #dukeofsussex @kensingtonroyal #socialmediaforsocialgood #thegreenthread #activecitizens #bethechange #endextinction #savetheplanet #naturalbeauty #saynotoplastic


0

-
▫️INTO▫️▫️THE ▫️▫️WILD ▫️

❓HOPE▫️FOR▫️THE▫️FUTURE❓

It’s great to report on GOOD NEWS on wildlife with organisations such as @africanparksnetwork who are delivering powerful results partnering with African governments and local communities.

‼️SLAUGHTER AND EXTINCTION‼️
.
‼️🦏🐘🦍CAN BE STOPPED🦍🐘🦏‼️

Their new President is HRH Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex a very astute appointment which will keep their work in the global spotlight!
.
They manage 15 African national parks and protected areas in nine countries covering 10.5 million hectares: Benin, Central African Republic, Chad, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Malawi, Mozambique, the Republic of Congo, Rwanda and Zambia.
.
The first park they assumed management of in 2003, and one of its greatest conservation successes, Majete in Malawi has been transformed to a productive and flourishing haven for Africa's most iconic wildlife, generating revenue and benefits for local communities.
.
Today, Majete is flourishing, so much so that wildlife is being moved to populate other parks and it has maintained a 14-year track record of ZERO POACHING of rhinos and elephants.
.
Majete is a tale of a park rising from the ashes – living proof of how a park deemed to be a wasteland can be revived and restored and serve as a life-source for wildlife and humans alike.

Photo @pedromcbrideb detail ( 2 of 6 )

#noēsis #AfricanParks #AnnualReport #Majete #Malawi #ecotourism #Restoration #Vietnam #China #Cambodia #USA #rhinopoaching #savetherhino #Ivory #saynotopoaching #elephant #savetheelephants #NaturesReturn #princeharry #dukeofsussex @kensingtonroyal#socialmediaforsocialgood #thegreenthread #activecitizens #bethechange #endextinction #savetheplanet #naturalbeauty #saynotoplastic


1

-
▫️INTO▫️▫️THE ▫️▫️WILD ▫️

❓HOPE▫️FOR▫️THE▫️FUTURE❓

It’s great to report on GOOD NEWS on wildlife with organisations such as @africanparksnetwork who are delivering powerful results partnering with African governments and local communities.

‼️SLAUGHTER AND EXTINCTION‼️
.
‼️🦏🐘🦍CAN BE STOPPED🦍🐘🦏‼️

Their new President is HRH Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex a very astute appointment which will keep their work in the global spotlight!
.
They manage 15 African national parks and protected areas in nine countries covering 10.5 million hectares: Benin, Central African Republic, Chad, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Malawi, Mozambique, the Republic of Congo, Rwanda and Zambia.
.
The first park they assumed management of in 2003, and one of its greatest conservation successes, Majete in Malawi has been transformed to a productive and flourishing haven for Africa's most iconic wildlife, generating revenue and benefits for local communities.
.
Today, Majete is flourishing, so much so that wildlife is being moved to populate other parks and it has maintained a 14-year track record of ZERO POACHING of rhinos and elephants.
.
Majete is a tale of a park rising from the ashes – living proof of how a park deemed to be a wasteland can be revived and restored and serve as a life-source for wildlife and humans alike.

Photo @pedromcbrideb detail ( 1 of 6 )

#noēsis #AfricanParks #AnnualReport #Majete #Malawi #ecotourism #Restoration #Vietnam #China #Cambodia #USA #rhinopoaching #savetherhino #Ivory #saynotopoaching #elephant #savetheelephants #NaturesReturn #princeharry #dukeofsussex @kensingtonroyal #socialmediaforsocialgood #thegreenthread #activecitizens #bethechange #endextinction #savetheplanet #naturalbeauty #saynotoplastic


0

🌍 For most of history, man has had to fight nature to survive; in this century he is beginning to realize that, in order to survive, he must protect it. 🌊 Jacques Yves Cousteau
#nature #enviroment #environmentalist
#leonardodicaprio #oceanview #tofino #protectnature #sharethecoast #bcferries #instapassport #thecreative #aroundtheworldpix #ig_masterpiece #travelog #mytinyatlas #visualmobs #theglobewanderer #forahappymoment #naturesreturn


3

@zakouma_national_park in Chad is one of the most remarkable stories about transformation. Between 2002 to 2010, 95% of the parks’ elephants were poached – almost 4,000 were slaughtered for their ivory where poachers would often take out multiple family units at the same time. Not only were they destroying the park's wildlife, they were wreaking havoc on local people too. In 2010, African Parks, on invitation by the Chadian Government, signed a long-term agreement to manage Zakouma and stop the bloodshed. Our first step was to overhaul law enforcement, but it wasn’t for the faint of heart. In 2012, six of our rangers were gunned down execution-style during their morning prayers. But our rangers, with their indomitable spirits, didn’t give up. Because of their efforts and effective community work, only 24 known elephants have been lost to poaching since 2010. Along with providing law enforcement, we built ‘Elephant Schools’ for local communities, providing desks, blackboards and teachers’ salaries, helping more than 1,500 children get an education. People were employed to help manage the park, making Zakouma one of the largest employers in the region. With law enforced and security reclaimed, tourists began to visit, delivering needed revenue back to the park and local communities. And then something miraculous happened. Elephants were able to be elephants once again, and for the first time in years, they began to breed and could raise their young. In early 2017, we counted 81 calves under the age of three. In 2011, we counted one. Elephants have now surpassed 527 individuals and are on the rise for the first time in a decade. We’ve come a long way since 2010. The story of Zakouma is of a park rising from the ashes and becoming an unlikely tale of redemption, for people and animals alike. Read the full story by clicking the link in the bio. Photo: @kyledenobrega
____________⠀
Our work in Zakouma would not be possible without the support of our partners: The Republic of Chad, the EU, Foundation Segré and the @usfws to name a few. #AfricanParks #AnnualReport #Restoration #NaturesReturn #Zakouma #Chad @voiceofchad


27

#Regram #RG @africanparksnetwork: Nature is being restored across the 15 parks we currently manage across Africa. Our 2017 Annual Report features the range of interventions currently underway, from extreme species translocations and reintroductions to providing security to create safer spaces for both humans and wildlife. Over the next few weeks, we will be sharing the stories of these remarkable parks, starting with the first park we assumed management of in 2003, and one of our greatest conservation successes. Over just 14 years, Majete has transformed from a once-empty forest with no employment or tourism and only a few remaining antelope within its perimeter, to a productive and flourishing haven for Africa's most iconic wildlife, generating revenue and benefits for local communities. Decades of lawlessness and poaching had seen the reserve’s wildlife completely eradicated by the 1990s. This all changed in 2003, when African Parks assumed management of Majete, the first park to enter our portfolio. We immediately began to revive the park through a series of species reintroductions. Today, Majete is flourishing, so much so that wildlife is being moved to populate other parks and private reserves within the country. We've maintained a 14-year track record of zero poaching of rhinos and elephants since their introduction; and tourism has increased 14 percent from last year, with over 9,000 visitors, half of whom were Malawian nationals bringing in over US$550,000 to the reserve and communities. Majete is a tale of a park rising from the ashes – living proof of how a park deemed to be a wasteland can be revived and restored and serve as a life-source for wildlife and humans alike. Read the full story by clicking the link in the bio. Photo @pedromcbride
###
African Parks success and ability to restore these areas could not have been achieved without the support of our partners: the DNPW, The Wyss Foundation, @wwfbelgium , the @postcodeloterij and the @peoplespostcodelottery
#AfricanParks #AnnualReport #Restoration #NaturesReturn


0

#Regram #RG @africanparksnetwork: Nature is being restored across the 15 parks we currently manage across Africa. Our 2017 Annual Report features the range of interventions currently underway, from extreme species translocations and reintroductions to providing security to create safer spaces for both humans and wildlife. Over the next few weeks, we will be sharing the stories of these remarkable parks, starting with the first park we assumed management of in 2003, and one of our greatest conservation successes. Over just 14 years, Majete has transformed from a once-empty forest with no employment or tourism and only a few remaining antelope within its perimeter, to a productive and flourishing haven for Africa's most iconic wildlife, generating revenue and benefits for local communities. Decades of lawlessness and poaching had seen the reserve’s wildlife completely eradicated by the 1990s. This all changed in 2003, when African Parks assumed management of Majete, the first park to enter our portfolio. We immediately began to revive the park through a series of species reintroductions. Today, Majete is flourishing, so much so that wildlife is being moved to populate other parks and private reserves within the country. We've maintained a 14-year track record of zero poaching of rhinos and elephants since their introduction; and tourism has increased 14 percent from last year, with over 9,000 visitors, half of whom were Malawian nationals bringing in over US$550,000 to the reserve and communities. Majete is a tale of a park rising from the ashes – living proof of how a park deemed to be a wasteland can be revived and restored and serve as a life-source for wildlife and humans alike. Read the full story by clicking the link in the bio. Photo @pedromcbride
###
African Parks success and ability to restore these areas could not have been achieved without the support of our partners: the DNPW, The Wyss Foundation, @wwfbelgium , the @postcodeloterij and the @peoplespostcodelottery
#AfricanParks #AnnualReport #Restoration #NaturesReturn


0

Histórias assim me dão esperança! 😌
#Repost @leonardodicaprio with @get_repost
・・・
#Regram #RG @africanparksnetwork: Nature is being restored across the 15 parks we currently manage across Africa. Our 2017 Annual Report features the range of interventions currently underway, from extreme species translocations and reintroductions to providing security to create safer spaces for both humans and wildlife. Over the next few weeks, we will be sharing the stories of these remarkable parks, starting with the first park we assumed management of in 2003, and one of our greatest conservation successes. Over just 14 years, Majete has transformed from a once-empty forest with no employment or tourism and only a few remaining antelope within its perimeter, to a productive and flourishing haven for Africa's most iconic wildlife, generating revenue and benefits for local communities. Decades of lawlessness and poaching had seen the reserve’s wildlife completely eradicated by the 1990s. This all changed in 2003, when African Parks assumed management of Majete, the first park to enter our portfolio. We immediately began to revive the park through a series of species reintroductions. Today, Majete is flourishing, so much so that wildlife is being moved to populate other parks and private reserves within the country. We've maintained a 14-year track record of zero poaching of rhinos and elephants since their introduction; and tourism has increased 14 percent from last year, with over 9,000 visitors, half of whom were Malawian nationals bringing in over US$550,000 to the reserve and communities. Majete is a tale of a park rising from the ashes – living proof of how a park deemed to be a wasteland can be revived and restored and serve as a life-source for wildlife and humans alike. Read the full story by clicking the link in the bio. Photo @pedromcbride
###
African Parks success and ability to restore these areas could not have been achieved without the support of our partners: the DNPW, The Wyss Foundation, @wwfbelgium , the @postcodeloterij and the @peoplespostcodelottery
#AfricanParks #AnnualReport #Restoration #NaturesReturn


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#Regram #RG @africanparksnetwork: Nature is being restored across the 15 parks we currently manage across Africa. Our 2017 Annual Report features the range of interventions currently underway, from extreme species translocations and reintroductions to providing security to create safer spaces for both humans and wildlife. Over the next few weeks, we will be sharing the stories of these remarkable parks, starting with the first park we assumed management of in 2003, and one of our greatest conservation successes. Over just 14 years, Majete has transformed from a once-empty forest with no employment or tourism and only a few remaining antelope within its perimeter, to a productive and flourishing haven for Africa's most iconic wildlife, generating revenue and benefits for local communities. Decades of lawlessness and poaching had seen the reserve’s wildlife completely eradicated by the 1990s. This all changed in 2003, when African Parks assumed management of Majete, the first park to enter our portfolio. We immediately began to revive the park through a series of species reintroductions. Today, Majete is flourishing, so much so that wildlife is being moved to populate other parks and private reserves within the country. We've maintained a 14-year track record of zero poaching of rhinos and elephants since their introduction; and tourism has increased 14 percent from last year, with over 9,000 visitors, half of whom were Malawian nationals bringing in over US$550,000 to the reserve and communities. Majete is a tale of a park rising from the ashes – living proof of how a park deemed to be a wasteland can be revived and restored and serve as a life-source for wildlife and humans alike. Read the full story by clicking the link in the bio. Photo @pedromcbride
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African Parks success and ability to restore these areas could not have been achieved without the support of our partners: the DNPW, The Wyss Foundation, @wwfbelgium , the @postcodeloterij and the @peoplespostcodelottery
#AfricanParks #AnnualReport #Restoration #NaturesReturn


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#Repost from @leonardodicaprio with @regram.app ... #Regram #RG @africanparksnetwork: Nature is being restored across the 15 parks we currently manage across Africa. Our 2017 Annual Report features the range of interventions currently underway, from extreme species translocations and reintroductions to providing security to create safer spaces for both humans and wildlife. Over the next few weeks, we will be sharing the stories of these remarkable parks, starting with the first park we assumed management of in 2003, and one of our greatest conservation successes. Over just 14 years, Majete has transformed from a once-empty forest with no employment or tourism and only a few remaining antelope within its perimeter, to a productive and flourishing haven for Africa's most iconic wildlife, generating revenue and benefits for local communities. Decades of lawlessness and poaching had seen the reserve’s wildlife completely eradicated by the 1990s. This all changed in 2003, when African Parks assumed management of Majete, the first park to enter our portfolio. We immediately began to revive the park through a series of species reintroductions. Today, Majete is flourishing, so much so that wildlife is being moved to populate other parks and private reserves within the country. We've maintained a 14-year track record of zero poaching of rhinos and elephants since their introduction; and tourism has increased 14 percent from last year, with over 9,000 visitors, half of whom were Malawian nationals bringing in over US$550,000 to the reserve and communities. Majete is a tale of a park rising from the ashes – living proof of how a park deemed to be a wasteland can be revived and restored and serve as a life-source for wildlife and humans alike. Read the full story by clicking the link in the bio. Photo @pedromcbride
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African Parks success and ability to restore these areas could not have been achieved without the support of our partners: the DNPW, The Wyss Foundation, @wwfbelgium , the @postcodeloterij and the @peoplespostcodelottery
#AfricanParks #AnnualReport #Restoration #NaturesReturn


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Repost @africanparksnetwork
by @media.repost:
Odzala-Kokoua National Park in the Congo is one of Africa’s oldest national parks, designated in 1935, and it received a Biosphere Reserve status in 1977. Covering an expansive 13,500 km2 area, Odzala lies in the heart of the Congo Basin. The basin is the second largest rainforest in the world, spanning more than two million square kilometers across six countries and accounting for 18% of the world's remaining rainforest. The biological diversity and endemism are extraordinary here, especially considering that humans have occupied the area for over 50,000 years. Today, the basin provides clean water, food and shelter to more than 75 million people. Despite the appearance of this breath-taking landscape, Odzala has had its share of ups and downs. Conservation efforts were very limited during the Congo Civil War from 1997 to 1999; several Ebola outbreaks threatened the gorilla population and led to the park being neglected, and victim to high levels of poaching for several years; and tourism was all but non-existent. ⠀
African Parks entered into a 25-year-long agreement in 2010 with the Ministry of Forest Economy, Sustainable Development and Environment to protect this globally significant park. Bushmeat poaching here has been and continues to be a significant threat, with almost 36,000 snares removed in the last year alone which is a major concern for Odzala’s western lowland gorillas, of which significantly 20 percent of the remaining global population is found in the park. Odzala is a vast wilderness, but the threats are many, and the survival of Congo’s elephants and gorillas, and the long-term future of this historic park depend on our intervention. Read the full story by clicking the link in the bio. Photo: @love_wild_africa
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Our work in Odzala is only possible due to the support of our partners - the Ministry of Forest Economy, Sustainable Development and Environment, Fondation Odzala, the EU, Swedish Postcode Foundation, @usfws, @wwf_deutschland and WWF-US.⠀
#AfricanParks #AnnualReport #Restoration #NaturesReturn #odzala #congo @ccc_odzala


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Repost @leonardodicaprio
by @media.repost:
#Regram #RG @africanparksnetwork: Nature is being restored across the 15 parks we currently manage across Africa. Our 2017 Annual Report features the range of interventions currently underway, from extreme species translocations and reintroductions to providing security to create safer spaces for both humans and wildlife. Over the next few weeks, we will be sharing the stories of these remarkable parks, starting with the first park we assumed management of in 2003, and one of our greatest conservation successes. Over just 14 years, Majete has transformed from a once-empty forest with no employment or tourism and only a few remaining antelope within its perimeter, to a productive and flourishing haven for Africa's most iconic wildlife, generating revenue and benefits for local communities. Decades of lawlessness and poaching had seen the reserve’s wildlife completely eradicated by the 1990s. This all changed in 2003, when African Parks assumed management of Majete, the first park to enter our portfolio. We immediately began to revive the park through a series of species reintroductions. Today, Majete is flourishing, so much so that wildlife is being moved to populate other parks and private reserves within the country. We've maintained a 14-year track record of zero poaching of rhinos and elephants since their introduction; and tourism has increased 14 percent from last year, with over 9,000 visitors, half of whom were Malawian nationals bringing in over US$550,000 to the reserve and communities. Majete is a tale of a park rising from the ashes – living proof of how a park deemed to be a wasteland can be revived and restored and serve as a life-source for wildlife and humans alike. Read the full story by clicking the link in the bio. Photo @pedromcbride
###
African Parks success and ability to restore these areas could not have been achieved without the support of our partners: the DNPW, The Wyss Foundation, @wwfbelgium , the @postcodeloterij and the @peoplespostcodelottery
#AfricanParks #AnnualReport #Restoration #NaturesReturn


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#Regram #RG @africanparksnetwork: Nature is being restored across the 15 parks we currently manage across Africa. Our 2017 Annual Report features the range of interventions currently underway, from extreme species translocations and reintroductions to providing security to create safer spaces for both humans and wildlife. Over the next few weeks, we will be sharing the stories of these remarkable parks, starting with the first park we assumed management of in 2003, and one of our greatest conservation successes. Over just 14 years, Majete has transformed from a once-empty forest with no employment or tourism and only a few remaining antelope within its perimeter, to a productive and flourishing haven for Africa's most iconic wildlife, generating revenue and benefits for local communities. Decades of lawlessness and poaching had seen the reserve’s wildlife completely eradicated by the 1990s. This all changed in 2003, when African Parks assumed management of Majete, the first park to enter our portfolio. We immediately began to revive the park through a series of species reintroductions. Today, Majete is flourishing, so much so that wildlife is being moved to populate other parks and private reserves within the country. We've maintained a 14-year track record of zero poaching of rhinos and elephants since their introduction; and tourism has increased 14 percent from last year, with over 9,000 visitors, half of whom were Malawian nationals bringing in over US$550,000 to the reserve and communities. Majete is a tale of a park rising from the ashes – living proof of how a park deemed to be a wasteland can be revived and restored and serve as a life-source for wildlife and humans alike. Read the full story by clicking the link in the bio. Photo @pedromcbride
###
African Parks success and ability to restore these areas could not have been achieved without the support of our partners: the DNPW, The Wyss Foundation, @wwfbelgium , the @postcodeloterij and the @peoplespostcodelottery
#AfricanParks #AnnualReport #Restoration #NaturesReturn


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#Regram #RG @africanparksnetwork: Nature is being restored across the 15 parks we currently manage across Africa. Our 2017 Annual Report features the range of interventions currently underway, from extreme species translocations and reintroductions to providing security to create safer spaces for both humans and wildlife. Over the next few weeks, we will be sharing the stories of these remarkable parks, starting with the first park we assumed management of in 2003, and one of our greatest conservation successes. Over just 14 years, Majete has transformed from a once-empty forest with no employment or tourism and only a few remaining antelope within its perimeter, to a productive and flourishing haven for Africa's most iconic wildlife, generating revenue and benefits for local communities. Decades of lawlessness and poaching had seen the reserve’s wildlife completely eradicated by the 1990s. This all changed in 2003, when African Parks assumed management of Majete, the first park to enter our portfolio. We immediately began to revive the park through a series of species reintroductions. Today, Majete is flourishing, so much so that wildlife is being moved to populate other parks and private reserves within the country. We've maintained a 14-year track record of zero poaching of rhinos and elephants since their introduction; and tourism has increased 14 percent from last year, with over 9,000 visitors, half of whom were Malawian nationals bringing in over US$550,000 to the reserve and communities. Majete is a tale of a park rising from the ashes – living proof of how a park deemed to be a wasteland can be revived and restored and serve as a life-source for wildlife and humans alike. Read the full story by clicking the link in the bio. Photo @pedromcbride
###
African Parks success and ability to restore these areas could not have been achieved without the support of our partners: the DNPW, The Wyss Foundation, @wwfbelgium , the @postcodeloterij and the @peoplespostcodelottery
#AfricanParks #AnnualReport #Restoration #NaturesReturn


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repost via @instarepost20 from @leonardodicaprio #Regram #RG @africanparksnetwork: Nature is being restored across the 15 parks we currently manage across Africa. Our 2017 Annual Report features the range of interventions currently underway, from extreme species translocations and reintroductions to providing security to create safer spaces for both humans and wildlife. Over the next few weeks, we will be sharing the stories of these remarkable parks, starting with the first park we assumed management of in 2003, and one of our greatest conservation successes. Over just 14 years, Majete has transformed from a once-empty forest with no employment or tourism and only a few remaining antelope within its perimeter, to a productive and flourishing haven for Africa's most iconic wildlife, generating revenue and benefits for local communities. Decades of lawlessness and poaching had seen the reserve’s wildlife completely eradicated by the 1990s. This all changed in 2003, when African Parks assumed management of Majete, the first park to enter our portfolio. We immediately began to revive the park through a series of species reintroductions. Today, Majete is flourishing, so much so that wildlife is being moved to populate other parks and private reserves within the country. We've maintained a 14-year track record of zero poaching of rhinos and elephants since their introduction; and tourism has increased 14 percent from last year, with over 9,000 visitors, half of whom were Malawian nationals bringing in over US$550,000 to the reserve and communities. Majete is a tale of a park rising from the ashes – living proof of how a park deemed to be a wasteland can be revived and restored and serve as a life-source for wildlife and humans alike. Read the full story by clicking the link in the bio. Photo @pedromcbride
###
African Parks success and ability to restore these areas could not have been achieved without the support of our partners: the DNPW, The Wyss Foundation, @wwfbelgium , the @postcodeloterij and the @peoplespostcodelottery
#AfricanParks #AnnualReport #Restoration #NaturesReturn


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#Regram #RG @africanparksnetwork: Nature is being restored across the 15 parks we currently manage across Africa. Our 2017 Annual Report features the range of interventions currently underway, from extreme species translocations and reintroductions to providing security to create safer spaces for both humans and wildlife. Over the next few weeks, we will be sharing the stories of these remarkable parks, starting with the first park we assumed management of in 2003, and one of our greatest conservation successes. Over just 14 years, Majete has transformed from a once-empty forest with no employment or tourism and only a few remaining antelope within its perimeter, to a productive and flourishing haven for Africa's most iconic wildlife, generating revenue and benefits for local communities. Decades of lawlessness and poaching had seen the reserve’s wildlife completely eradicated by the 1990s. This all changed in 2003, when African Parks assumed management of Majete, the first park to enter our portfolio. We immediately began to revive the park through a series of species reintroductions. Today, Majete is flourishing, so much so that wildlife is being moved to populate other parks and private reserves within the country. We've maintained a 14-year track record of zero poaching of rhinos and elephants since their introduction; and tourism has increased 14 percent from last year, with over 9,000 visitors, half of whom were Malawian nationals bringing in over US$550,000 to the reserve and communities. Majete is a tale of a park rising from the ashes – living proof of how a park deemed to be a wasteland can be revived and restored and serve as a life-source for wildlife and humans alike. Read the full story by clicking the link in the bio. Photo @pedromcbride
###
African Parks success and ability to restore these areas could not have been achieved without the support of our partners: the DNPW, The Wyss Foundation, @wwfbelgium , the @postcodeloterij and the @peoplespostcodelottery
#AfricanParks #AnnualReport #Restoration #NaturesReturn


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Regrann from @leonardodicaprio - #Regram #RG @africanparksnetwork: Nature is being restored across the 15 parks we currently manage across Africa. Our 2017 Annual Report features the range of interventions currently underway, from extreme species translocations and reintroductions to providing security to create safer spaces for both humans and wildlife. Over the next few weeks, we will be sharing the stories of these remarkable parks, starting with the first park we assumed management of in 2003, and one of our greatest conservation successes. Over just 14 years, Majete has transformed from a once-empty forest with no employment or tourism and only a few remaining antelope within its perimeter, to a productive and flourishing haven for Africa's most iconic wildlife, generating revenue and benefits for local communities. Decades of lawlessness and poaching had seen the reserve’s wildlife completely eradicated by the 1990s. This all changed in 2003, when African Parks assumed management of Majete, the first park to enter our portfolio. We immediately began to revive the park through a series of species reintroductions. Today, Majete is flourishing, so much so that wildlife is being moved to populate other parks and private reserves within the country. We've maintained a 14-year track record of zero poaching of rhinos and elephants since their introduction; and tourism has increased 14 percent from last year, with over 9,000 visitors, half of whom were Malawian nationals bringing in over US$550,000 to the reserve and communities. Majete is a tale of a park rising from the ashes – living proof of how a park deemed to be a wasteland can be revived and restored and serve as a life-source for wildlife and humans alike. Read the full story by clicking the link in the bio. Photo @pedromcbride
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African Parks success and ability to restore these areas could not have been achieved without the support of our partners: the DNPW, The Wyss Foundation, @wwfbelgium , the @postcodeloterij and the @peoplespostcodelottery
#AfricanParks #AnnualReport #Restoration #NaturesReturn - #regrann


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🤗😇 Regrann from @leonardodicaprio - #Regram #RG @africanparksnetwork: Nature is being restored across the 15 parks we currently manage across Africa. Our 2017 Annual Report features the range of interventions currently underway, from extreme species translocations and reintroductions to providing security to create safer spaces for both humans and wildlife. Over the next few weeks, we will be sharing the stories of these remarkable parks, starting with the first park we assumed management of in 2003, and one of our greatest conservation successes. Over just 14 years, Majete has transformed from a once-empty forest with no employment or tourism and only a few remaining antelope within its perimeter, to a productive and flourishing haven for Africa's most iconic wildlife, generating revenue and benefits for local communities. Decades of lawlessness and poaching had seen the reserve’s wildlife completely eradicated by the 1990s. This all changed in 2003, when African Parks assumed management of Majete, the first park to enter our portfolio. We immediately began to revive the park through a series of species reintroductions. Today, Majete is flourishing, so much so that wildlife is being moved to populate other parks and private reserves within the country. We've maintained a 14-year track record of zero poaching of rhinos and elephants since their introduction; and tourism has increased 14 percent from last year, with over 9,000 visitors, half of whom were Malawian nationals bringing in over US$550,000 to the reserve and communities. Majete is a tale of a park rising from the ashes – living proof of how a park deemed to be a wasteland can be revived and restored and serve as a life-source for wildlife and humans alike. Read the full story by clicking the link in the bio. Photo @pedromcbride
###
African Parks success and ability to restore these areas could not have been achieved without the support of our partners: the DNPW, The Wyss Foundation, @wwfbelgium , the @postcodeloterij and the @peoplespostcodelottery
#AfricanParks #AnnualReport #Restoration #NaturesReturn - #regrann


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Regrann from @africanparksnetwork - Nature is being restored across the 15 parks we currently manage across Africa. Our 2017 Annual Report features the range of interventions currently underway, from extreme species translocations and reintroductions to providing security to create safer spaces for both humans and wildlife. Over the next few weeks, we will be sharing the stories of these remarkable parks, starting with the first park we assumed management of in 2003, and one of our greatest conservation successes. Over just 14 years, Majete has transformed from a once-empty forest with no employment or tourism and only a few remaining antelope within its perimeter, to a productive and flourishing haven for Africa's most iconic wildlife, generating revenue and benefits for local communities. Decades of lawlessness and poaching had seen the reserve’s wildlife completely eradicated by the 1990s. This all changed in 2003, when African Parks assumed management of Majete, the first park to enter our portfolio. We immediately began to revive the park through a series of species reintroductions. Today, Majete is flourishing, so much so that wildlife is being moved to populate other parks and private reserves within the country. We've maintained a 14-year track record of zero poaching of rhinos and elephants since their introduction; and tourism has increased 14 percent from last year, with over 9,000 visitors, half of whom were Malawian nationals bringing in over US$550,000 to the reserve and communities. Majete is a tale of a park rising from the ashes – living proof of how a park deemed to be a wasteland can be revived and restored and serve as a life-source for wildlife and humans alike. Read the full story by clicking the link in the bio. Photo @pedromcbride
###
African Parks success and ability to restore these areas could not have been achieved without the support of our partners: the DNPW, The Wyss Foundation, @wwfbelgium , the @postcodeloterij and the @peoplespostcodelottery
#AfricanParks #AnnualReport #Restoration #NaturesReturn - #regrann


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#Regram #RG @africanparksnetwork: Nature is being restored across the 15 parks we currently manage across Africa. Our 2017 Annual Report features the range of interventions currently underway, from extreme species translocations and reintroductions to providing security to create safer spaces for both humans and wildlife. Over the next few weeks, we will be sharing the stories of these remarkable parks, starting with the first park we assumed management of in 2003, and one of our greatest conservation successes. Over just 14 years, Majete has transformed from a once-empty forest with no employment or tourism and only a few remaining antelope within its perimeter, to a productive and flourishing haven for Africa's most iconic wildlife, generating revenue and benefits for local communities. Decades of lawlessness and poaching had seen the reserve’s wildlife completely eradicated by the 1990s. This all changed in 2003, when African Parks assumed management of Majete, the first park to enter our portfolio. We immediately began to revive the park through a series of species reintroductions. Today, Majete is flourishing, so much so that wildlife is being moved to populate other parks and private reserves within the country. We've maintained a 14-year track record of zero poaching of rhinos and elephants since their introduction; and tourism has increased 14 percent from last year, with over 9,000 visitors, half of whom were Malawian nationals bringing in over US$550,000 to the reserve and communities. Majete is a tale of a park rising from the ashes – living proof of how a park deemed to be a wasteland can be revived and restored and serve as a life-source for wildlife and humans alike. Read the full story by clicking the link in the bio. Photo @pedromcbride
###
African Parks success and ability to restore these areas could not have been achieved without the support of our partners: the DNPW, The Wyss Foundation, @wwfbelgium , the @postcodeloterij and the @peoplespostcodelottery
#AfricanParks #AnnualReport #Restoration #NaturesReturn


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