#NaturesReturn

Instagram photos and videos

#AfricanParks#Conservation#naturesreturn#Liwonde#Lions#NaturesReturn#Majete#Wildlife#Predators#DutchGovernment#Repost#goodnews#zakouma#africanparks#nature#abandoned#Malawi#wildlife#animalonearth#conservation#chad#rhinosreturn#travel#landscape#urban#elephants#wanderlust#repost#rhinos#bigcats#decay#majete

Hashtags #NaturesReturn for Instagram

@natgeo photo by @stevewinterphoto with @africanparksnetwork

Lions in Malawi, the ‘warm heart of Africa’, are making a comeback! The country’s pride is growing as six wild lions have been safely transported from South Africa to their new homes in Majete Wildlife Reserve and Liwonde National Park to help revive the parks’ predator populations. Just last week, four of these lions (two males and two females) joined the two male lions who were translocated to Liwonde in February this year. Lions were last seen in the park over four years ago, and it had been even longer since a breeding population lived in the park. We moved the other two males to Majete Wildlife Reserve to improve the genetic diversity of the current lion population there. All lions are in secure enclosures (bomas) where they are adjusting to their new environment and bonding, and will be released over the coming weeks and months. Africa’s wildlife has suffered immensely in recent decades, and the lion population has crashed by more than 40% since 1993. Just 100 years ago, more than 200,000 lions lived in Africa- today, best estimates put them at fewer than 20,000. “Very simply, if a park is not being managed then it will be lost, we have two options, one is we allow these places to disappear. The other is we make our own plan,” says CEO of @africanparksnetwork, Peter Fearnhead who was recently quoted by the Washington Post (see link in our bio). By working closely with the Government of Malawi, the local community as with critical support from the Dutch Government, @lionrecovery and @leonardodicapriofdn – we are making a plan to restore the species to protected areas across Africa for the benefit of future generations. #AfricanParks #NaturesReturn #Conservation #Wildlife #Liwonde #Majete #Lions #Predators @africanparksnetwork #DutchGovernment, @lionrecovery and @leonardodicapriofdn @Zakouma_national_park


0

@natgeo photo by @stevewinterphoto with @africanparksnetwork

Lions in Malawi, the ‘warm heart of Africa’, are making a comeback! The country’s pride is growing as six wild lions have been safely transported from South Africa to their new homes in Majete Wildlife Reserve and Liwonde National Park to help revive the parks’ predator populations. Just last week, four of these lions (two males and two females) joined the two male lions who were translocated to Liwonde in February this year. Lions were last seen in the park over four years ago, and it had been even longer since a breeding population lived in the park. We moved the other two males to Majete Wildlife Reserve to improve the genetic diversity of the current lion population there. All lions are in secure enclosures (bomas) where they are adjusting to their new environment and bonding, and will be released over the coming weeks and months. Africa’s wildlife has suffered immensely in recent decades, and the lion population has crashed by more than 40% since 1993. Just 100 years ago, more than 200,000 lions lived in Africa- today, best estimates put them at fewer than 20,000. “Very simply, if a park is not being managed then it will be lost, we have two options, one is we allow these places to disappear. The other is we make our own plan,” says CEO of @africanparksnetwork, Peter Fearnhead who was recently quoted by the Washington Post (see link in our bio). By working closely with the Government of Malawi, the local community as with critical support from the Dutch Government, @lionrecovery and @leonardodicapriofdn – we are making a plan to restore the species to protected areas across Africa for the benefit of future generations. #AfricanParks #NaturesReturn #Conservation #Wildlife #Liwonde #Majete #Lions #Predators @africanparksnetwork #DutchGovernment, @lionrecovery and @leonardodicapriofdn @Zakouma_national_park


0

For too long, good news in conservation has been the absence of bad news. However, this is no longer an acceptable outcome if we are to succeed in conserving Africa’s natural heritage. African Parks was founded on the very premise that the remaining intact and wild landscapes of Africa can be successfully conserved, and even those that are degraded can be restored. At the close of 2017, African Parks was responsible for managing 14 protected areas in nine countries (we now manage 15), spanning 10.5 million hectares (40,540 square miles) covering seven of the 11 ecological biomes on the continent. In each one of these protected areas under our management, we are conducting a range of active management interventions – extreme species translocations and reintroductions, providing security to create safer spaces for both humans and wildlife, and ensuring that local people benefit, thus building constituencies for conservation. Where security is restored and governance established, we see the rise of civility, and the overall return to a better way of life. This is why we wanted our 2017 annual report to focus on restoration – in celebration of the return of these species, and the overall transformation underway in the parks. We would love the share what we have achieved in the last year with you, start exploring the 2017 annual report “Restoration: Nature’s Return” by clicking the link in the bio Photo: @lifethroughalensphotography
#NaturesReturn #AnnualReport #AfricanParks #Conservation #Wildlife #Communities #Rangers #instagood


24

❤️❤️❤️ #Repost @natgeo (@get_repost)
・・・
@natgeo photo by @stevewinterphoto with @africanparksnetwork

Lions in Malawi, the ‘warm heart of Africa’, are making a comeback! The country’s pride is growing as six wild lions have been safely transported from South Africa to their new homes in Majete Wildlife Reserve and Liwonde National Park to help revive the parks’ predator populations. Just last week, four of these lions (two males and two females) joined the two male lions who were translocated to Liwonde in February this year. Lions were last seen in the park over four years ago, and it had been even longer since a breeding population lived in the park. We moved the other two males to Majete Wildlife Reserve to improve the genetic diversity of the current lion population there. All lions are in secure enclosures (bomas) where they are adjusting to their new environment and bonding, and will be released over the coming weeks and months. Africa’s wildlife has suffered immensely in recent decades, and the lion population has crashed by more than 40% since 1993. Just 100 years ago, more than 200,000 lions lived in Africa- today, best estimates put them at fewer than 20,000. “Very simply, if a park is not being managed then it will be lost, we have two options, one is we allow these places to disappear. The other is we make our own plan,” says CEO of @africanparksnetwork, Peter Fearnhead who was recently quoted by the Washington Post (see link in our bio). By working closely with the Government of Malawi, the local community as with critical support from the Dutch Government, @lionrecovery and @leonardodicapriofdn – we are making a plan to restore the species to protected areas across Africa for the benefit of future generations. #AfricanParks #NaturesReturn #Conservation #Wildlife #Liwonde #Majete #Lions #Predators @africanparksnetwork #DutchGovernment, @lionrecovery and @leonardodicapriofdn @Zakouma_national_park


0

©️ #Repost @africanparksnetwork
.
A herd of elephants moves into the sunset in Majete Wildlife Reserve in Malawi.
Elephants were hunted out of Majete in the 1990’s until 2006, when African Parks reintroduced them – and they grew to a population of over 400. In 2017, we took 150 of them to help repopulate Nkhotakota, 650km north, whose elephants had all been nearly poached out. Majete was able to help give life to Nkhotakota, a park that shared the same painful past, but now holds the same hopeful future.
Photo by @pedromcbride
.
#majete #malawi #AfricanParks #Conservation #naturesreturn #hope #goodnews #500elephants #beautifuldestinations #traveldestinations #travelstroke #bbctravel #travelblogger #travelblog #tourist #culture #follow #travel_malawi #visitmalawi


9

@natgeo photo by @stevewinterphoto with @africanparksnetwork

Lions in Malawi, the ‘warm heart of Africa’, are making a comeback! The country’s pride is growing as six wild lions have been safely transported from South Africa to their new homes in Majete Wildlife Reserve and Liwonde National Park to help revive the parks’ predator populations. Just last week, four of these lions (two males and two females) joined the two male lions who were translocated to Liwonde in February this year. Lions were last seen in the park over four years ago, and it had been even longer since a breeding population lived in the park. We moved the other two males to Majete Wildlife Reserve to improve the genetic diversity of the current lion population there. All lions are in secure enclosures (bomas) where they are adjusting to their new environment and bonding, and will be released over the coming weeks and months. Africa’s wildlife has suffered immensely in recent decades, and the lion population has crashed by more than 40% since 1993. Just 100 years ago, more than 200,000 lions lived in Africa- today, best estimates put them at fewer than 20,000. “Very simply, if a park is not being managed then it will be lost, we have two options, one is we allow these places to disappear. The other is we make our own plan,” says CEO of @africanparksnetwork, Peter Fearnhead who was recently quoted by the Washington Post (see link in our bio). By working closely with the Government of Malawi, the local community as with critical support from the Dutch Government, @lionrecovery and @leonardodicapriofdn – we are making a plan to restore the species to protected areas across Africa for the benefit of future generations. #AfricanParks #NaturesReturn #Conservation #Wildlife #Liwonde #Majete #Lions #Predators @africanparksnetwork #DutchGovernment, @lionrecovery and @leonardodicapriofdn @Zakouma_national_park
#colorful #pics #myart #shiny #clean #focus #arte #illustration #photography #artist #amazing #composition #dibujo #artwork #artistic #tagblender #artists #classical #painting #drawing #pencil


3

#Repost @natgeo (@get_repost)
・・・
@natgeo photo by @stevewinterphoto with @africanparksnetwork

Lions in Malawi, the ‘warm heart of Africa’, are making a comeback! The country’s pride is growing as six wild lions have been safely transported from South Africa to their new homes in Majete Wildlife Reserve and Liwonde National Park to help revive the parks’ predator populations. Just last week, four of these lions (two males and two females) joined the two male lions who were translocated to Liwonde in February this year. Lions were last seen in the park over four years ago, and it had been even longer since a breeding population lived in the park. We moved the other two males to Majete Wildlife Reserve to improve the genetic diversity of the current lion population there. All lions are in secure enclosures (bomas) where they are adjusting to their new environment and bonding, and will be released over the coming weeks and months. Africa’s wildlife has suffered immensely in recent decades, and the lion population has crashed by more than 40% since 1993. Just 100 years ago, more than 200,000 lions lived in Africa- today, best estimates put them at fewer than 20,000. “Very simply, if a park is not being managed then it will be lost, we have two options, one is we allow these places to disappear. The other is we make our own plan,” says CEO of @africanparksnetwork, Peter Fearnhead who was recently quoted by the Washington Post (see link in our bio). By working closely with the Government of Malawi, the local community as with critical support from the Dutch Government, @lionrecovery and @leonardodicapriofdn – we are making a plan to restore the species to protected areas across Africa for the benefit of future generations. #AfricanParks #NaturesReturn #Conservation #Wildlife #Liwonde #Majete #Lions #Predators @africanparksnetwork #DutchGovernment, @lionrecovery and @leonardodicapriofdn @Zakouma_national_park


1

💕💕💕
#Repost @stevewinterphoto
・・・
@natgeo photo by @stevewinterphoto with @africanparksnetwork

Lions in Malawi, the ‘warm heart of Africa’, are making a comeback! The country’s pride is growing as six wild lions have been safely transported from South Africa to their new homes in Majete Wildlife Reserve and Liwonde National Park to help revive the parks’ predator populations. Just last week, four of these lions (two males and two females) joined the two male lions who were translocated to Liwonde in February this year. Lions were last seen in the park over four years ago, and it had been even longer since a breeding population lived in the park. We moved the other two males to Majete Wildlife Reserve to improve the genetic diversity of the current lion population there. All lions are in secure enclosures (bomas) where they are adjusting to their new environment and bonding, and will be released over the coming weeks and months. Africa’s wildlife has suffered immensely in recent decades, and the lion population has crashed by more than 40% since 1993. Just 100 years ago, more than 200,000 lions lived in Africa- today, best estimates put them at fewer than 20,000. “Very simply, if a park is not being managed then it will be lost, we have two options, one is we allow these places to disappear. The other is we make our own plan,” says CEO of @africanparksnetwork, Peter Fearnhead who was recently quoted by the Washington Post (see link in our bio). By working closely with the Government of Malawi, the local community as with critical support from the Dutch Government, @lionrecovery and @leonardodicapriofdn – we are making a plan to restore the species to protected areas across Africa for the benefit of future generations. #AfricanParks #NaturesReturn #Conservation #Wildlife #Liwonde #Majete #Lions #Predators @africanparksnetwork #DutchGovernment, @lionrecovery and @leonardodicapriofdn @reddigitalcinema #reddigitalcinema @CanonUSA #CanonUSA @zakouma_national_park


2

@natgeo photo by @stevewinterphoto with @africanparksnetwork

Lions in Malawi, the ‘warm heart of Africa’, are making a comeback! The country’s pride is growing as six wild lions have been safely transported from South Africa to their new homes in Majete Wildlife Reserve and Liwonde National Park to help revive the parks’ predator populations. Just last week, four of these lions (two males and two females) joined the two male lions who were translocated to Liwonde in February this year. Lions were last seen in the park over four years ago, and it had been even longer since a breeding population lived in the park. We moved the other two males to Majete Wildlife Reserve to improve the genetic diversity of the current lion population there. All lions are in secure enclosures (bomas) where they are adjusting to their new environment and bonding, and will be released over the coming weeks and months. Africa’s wildlife has suffered immensely in recent decades, and the lion population has crashed by more than 40% since 1993. Just 100 years ago, more than 200,000 lions lived in Africa- today, best estimates put them at fewer than 20,000. “Very simply, if a park is not being managed then it will be lost, we have two options, one is we allow these places to disappear. The other is we make our own plan,” says CEO of @africanparksnetwork, Peter Fearnhead who was recently quoted by the Washington Post (see link in our bio). By working closely with the Government of Malawi, the local community as with critical support from the Dutch Government, @lionrecovery and @leonardodicapriofdn – we are making a plan to restore the species to protected areas across Africa for the benefit of future generations. #AfricanParks #NaturesReturn #Conservation #Wildlife #Liwonde #Majete #Lions #Predators @africanparksnetwork #DutchGovernment, @lionrecovery and @leonardodicapriofdn @Zakouma_national_park


0

Love has no borders 💞
#Repost @natgeo
.
.
.
@natgeo photo by @stevewinterphoto with @africanparksnetwork

Lions in Malawi, the ‘warm heart of Africa’, are making a comeback! The country’s pride is growing as six wild lions have been safely transported from South Africa to their new homes in Majete Wildlife Reserve and Liwonde National Park to help revive the parks’ predator populations. Just last week, four of these lions (two males and two females) joined the two male lions who were translocated to Liwonde in February this year. Lions were last seen in the park over four years ago, and it had been even longer since a breeding population lived in the park. We moved the other two males to Majete Wildlife Reserve to improve the genetic diversity of the current lion population there. All lions are in secure enclosures (bomas) where they are adjusting to their new environment and bonding, and will be released over the coming weeks and months. Africa’s wildlife has suffered immensely in recent decades, and the lion population has crashed by more than 40% since 1993. Just 100 years ago, more than 200,000 lions lived in Africa- today, best estimates put them at fewer than 20,000. “Very simply, if a park is not being managed then it will be lost, we have two options, one is we allow these places to disappear. The other is we make our own plan,” says CEO of @africanparksnetwork, Peter Fearnhead who was recently quoted by the Washington Post (see link in our bio). By working closely with the Government of Malawi, the local community as with critical support from the Dutch Government, @lionrecovery and @leonardodicapriofdn – we are making a plan to restore the species to protected areas across Africa for the benefit of future generations. #AfricanParks #NaturesReturn #Conservation #Wildlife #Liwonde #Majete #Lions #Predators @africanparksnetwork #DutchGovernment, @lionrecovery and @leonardodicapriofdn @Zakouma_national_park


1

👆Double tap for this.
.
©️ 📸 Credits to @sean_viljoen
.
🇲🇼Predators are on the rise in Malawi. After months of preparation, we have reintroduced wild lions and cheetah to Liwonde National Park and have supplemented lion populations at Majete Wildlife Reserve – all within the last year. Large predators are a key to a healthy ecosystem, and as both Liwonde and Majete are safe and fenced protected areas, they have a good chance of long-term success. However, there is always a risk of a conflict situation. African Parks has taken every precaution in both Majete to reduce these risks. We have taken several measures such as investing in fencing the perimeter of the park and ongoing engagement with communities to inform them about the fence, its maintenance and security, as well as how to live safely with these large mammals. Local communities are integral to the protection of the extraordinary landscapes where we work. They are the custodians of the wildlife and ultimately benefit from the park’s existence as a result of economic development. National parks bring in much-needed tourism revenue to the park, and properly managed parks make a direct contribution to local and national economies. Our hope is to create a better future for all where local people reap the benefits of a park restored. @africanparksnetwork #repost
.
#AfricanParks #NaturesReturn #Liwonde #Majete #Malawi #Lions #Cheetah #predators #safari #africa #pride #savethelions #bigcats #traveldestinations #travelstroke #travelblogger #travelblog #tourist #culture #follow #wanderlust #fernweh #travel #worldtraveler #worldwide #travel_malawi #visit2malawi


7

everything is nature. #naturesreturn #iamnature #mysoulisnature #vegan #wearenature #treeoftrurh #truthoflife #treeofrebirth.
a leaf in the wind is carried with the energy of our ancestors.
wind = souls = energy


0

An amazing read below. We really need to start protecting Our Wildlife and Our beautiful Planet.
.......
Repost @natgeo
by @media.repost:
@natgeo photo by @stevewinterphoto with @africanparksnetwork
......
Lions in Malawi, the ‘warm heart of Africa’, are making a comeback! The country’s pride is growing as six wild lions have been safely transported from South Africa to their new homes in Majete Wildlife Reserve and Liwonde National Park to help revive the parks’ predator populations. Just last week, four of these lions (two males and two females) joined the two male lions who were translocated to Liwonde in February this year. Lions were last seen in the park over four years ago, and it had been even longer since a breeding population lived in the park. We moved the other two males to Majete Wildlife Reserve to improve the genetic diversity of the current lion population there. All lions are in secure enclosures (bomas) where they are adjusting to their new environment and bonding, and will be released over the coming weeks and months. Africa’s wildlife has suffered immensely in recent decades, and the lion population has crashed by more than 40% since 1993. Just 100 years ago, more than 200,000 lions lived in Africa- today, best estimates put them at fewer than 20,000. “Very simply, if a park is not being managed then it will be lost, we have two options, one is we allow these places to disappear. The other is we make our own plan,” says CEO of @africanparksnetwork, Peter Fearnhead who was recently quoted by the Washington Post (see link in our bio). By working closely with the Government of Malawi, the local community as with critical support from the Dutch Government, @lionrecovery and @leonardodicapriofdn – we are making a plan to restore the species to protected areas across Africa for the benefit of future generations. #AfricanParks #NaturesReturn #Conservation #Wildlife #Liwonde #Majete #Lions #Predators @africanparksnetwork #DutchGovernment, @lionrecovery and @leonardodicapriofdn @Zakouma_national_park


1

Regrann from @natgeo - @natgeo photo by @stevewinterphoto with @africanparksnetwork

Lions in Malawi, the ‘warm heart of Africa’, are making a comeback! The country’s pride is growing as six wild lions have been safely transported from South Africa to their new homes in Majete Wildlife Reserve and Liwonde National Park to help revive the parks’ predator populations. Just last week, four of these lions (two males and two females) joined the two male lions who were translocated to Liwonde in February this year. Lions were last seen in the park over four years ago, and it had been even longer since a breeding population lived in the park. We moved the other two males to Majete Wildlife Reserve to improve the genetic diversity of the current lion population there. All lions are in secure enclosures (bomas) where they are adjusting to their new environment and bonding, and will be released over the coming weeks and months. Africa’s wildlife has suffered immensely in recent decades, and the lion population has crashed by more than 40% since 1993. Just 100 years ago, more than 200,000 lions lived in Africa- today, best estimates put them at fewer than 20,000. “Very simply, if a park is not being managed then it will be lost, we have two options, one is we allow these places to disappear. The other is we make our own plan,” says CEO of @africanparksnetwork, Peter Fearnhead who was recently quoted by the Washington Post (see link in our bio). By working closely with the Government of Malawi, the local community as with critical support from the Dutch Government, @lionrecovery and @leonardodicapriofdn – we are making a plan to restore the species to protected areas across Africa for the benefit of future generations. #AfricanParks #NaturesReturn #Conservation #Wildlife #Liwonde #Majete #Lions #Predators @africanparksnetwork #DutchGovernment, @lionrecovery and @leonardodicapriofdn @Zakouma_national_park - #regrann


0

Predators are on the rise in Malawi. After months of preparation, we have reintroduced wild lions and cheetah to Liwonde National Park and have supplemented lion populations at Majete Wildlife Reserve – all within the last year. Large predators are a key to a healthy ecosystem, and as both Liwonde and Majete are safe and fenced protected areas, they have a good chance of long-term success. However, there is always a risk of a conflict situation. African Parks has taken every precaution in both Majete to reduce these risks. We have taken several measures such as investing in fencing the perimeter of the park and ongoing engagement with communities to inform them about the fence, its maintenance and security, as well as how to live safely with these large mammals. Local communities are integral to the protection of the extraordinary landscapes where we work. They are the custodians of the wildlife and ultimately benefit from the park’s existence as a result of economic development. National parks bring in much-needed tourism revenue to the park, and properly managed parks make a direct contribution to local and national economies. Our hope is to create a better future for all where local people reap the benefits of a park restored. Photo: @sean_viljoen #AfricanParks #NaturesReturn #Liwonde #Majete #Malawi #Lions #Cheetah #predators #safari #africa #pride #savethelions #bigcats


17

#Repost @natgeo
• • •
@natgeo photo by @stevewinterphoto with @africanparksnetwork

Lions in Malawi, the ‘warm heart of Africa’, are making a comeback! The country’s pride is growing as six wild lions have been safely transported from South Africa to their new homes in Majete Wildlife Reserve and Liwonde National Park to help revive the parks’ predator populations. Just last week, four of these lions (two males and two females) joined the two male lions who were translocated to Liwonde in February this year. Lions were last seen in the park over four years ago, and it had been even longer since a breeding population lived in the park. We moved the other two males to Majete Wildlife Reserve to improve the genetic diversity of the current lion population there. All lions are in secure enclosures (bomas) where they are adjusting to their new environment and bonding, and will be released over the coming weeks and months. Africa’s wildlife has suffered immensely in recent decades, and the lion population has crashed by more than 40% since 1993. Just 100 years ago, more than 200,000 lions lived in Africa- today, best estimates put them at fewer than 20,000. “Very simply, if a park is not being managed then it will be lost, we have two options, one is we allow these places to disappear. The other is we make our own plan,” says CEO of @africanparksnetwork, Peter Fearnhead who was recently quoted by the Washington Post (see link in our bio). By working closely with the Government of Malawi, the local community as with critical support from the Dutch Government, @lionrecovery and @leonardodicapriofdn – we are making a plan to restore the species to protected areas across Africa for the benefit of future generations. #AfricanParks #NaturesReturn #Conservation #Wildlife #Liwonde #Majete #Lions #Predators @africanparksnetwork #DutchGovernment, @lionrecovery and @leonardodicapriofdn @Zakouma_national_park


0

#Repost @africanparksnetwork (@get_repost)
・・・
Lions in Malawi, the ‘warm heart of Africa’, are making a comeback! The country’s pride is growing as six wild lions have been safely transported from South Africa to their new homes in Majete Wildlife Reserve and Liwonde National Park to help revive the parks’ predator populations. Just last week, four of these lions (two males and two females) joined the two male lions who were translocated to Liwonde in February this year. Lions were last seen in the park over four years ago, and it had been even longer since a breeding population lived in the park. We moved the other two males to Majete Wildlife Reserve to improve the genetic diversity of the current lion population there. All lions are in secure enclosures (bomas) where they are adjusting to their new environment and bonding, and will be released over the coming weeks and months. Africa’s wildlife has suffered immensely in recent decades, and the lion population has crashed by more than 40% since 1993. Just 100 years ago, more than 200,000 lions lived in Africa- today, best estimates put them at fewer than 20,000. “Very simply, if a park is not being managed then it will be lost, we have two options, one is we allow these places to disappear. The other is we make our own plan,” says CEO of @africanparksnetwork, Peter Fearnhead who was recently quoted by the Washington Post (see link in our bio). By working closely with the Government of Malawi, the local community as with critical support from the Dutch Government, @lionrecovery and @leonardodicapriofdn – we are making a plan to restore the species to protected areas across Africa for the benefit of future generations. Photo: @stevewinterphoto #AfricanParks #NaturesReturn #Conservation #Wildlife #Liwonde #Majete #Lions #Predators


1

Regrann from @natgeo - @natgeo photo by @stevewinterphoto with @africanparksnetwork

Lions in Malawi, the ‘warm heart of Africa’, are making a comeback! The country’s pride is growing as six wild lions have been safely transported from South Africa to their new homes in Majete Wildlife Reserve and Liwonde National Park to help revive the parks’ predator populations. Just last week, four of these lions (two males and two females) joined the two male lions who were translocated to Liwonde in February this year. Lions were last seen in the park over four years ago, and it had been even longer since a breeding population lived in the park. We moved the other two males to Majete Wildlife Reserve to improve the genetic diversity of the current lion population there. All lions are in secure enclosures (bomas) where they are adjusting to their new environment and bonding, and will be released over the coming weeks and months. Africa’s wildlife has suffered immensely in recent decades, and the lion population has crashed by more than 40% since 1993. Just 100 years ago, more than 200,000 lions lived in Africa- today, best estimates put them at fewer than 20,000. “Very simply, if a park is not being managed then it will be lost, we have two options, one is we allow these places to disappear. The other is we make our own plan,” says CEO of @africanparksnetwork, Peter Fearnhead who was recently quoted by the Washington Post (see link in our bio). By working closely with the Government of Malawi, the local community as with critical support from the Dutch Government, @lionrecovery and @leonardodicapriofdn – we are making a plan to restore the species to protected areas across Africa for the benefit of future generations. #AfricanParks #NaturesReturn #Conservation #Wildlife #Liwonde #Majete #Lions #Predators @africanparksnetwork #DutchGovernment, @lionrecovery and @leonardodicapriofdn @Zakouma_national_park - #regrann


0

@natgeo photo by @stevewinterphoto with @africanparksnetwork

Lions in Malawi, the ‘warm heart of Africa’, are making a comeback! The country’s pride is growing as six wild lions have been safely transported from South Africa to their new homes in Majete Wildlife Reserve and Liwonde National Park to help revive the parks’ predator populations. Just last week, four of these lions (two males and two females) joined the two male lions who were translocated to Liwonde in February this year. Lions were last seen in the park over four years ago, and it had been even longer since a breeding population lived in the park. We moved the other two males to Majete Wildlife Reserve to improve the genetic diversity of the current lion population there. All lions are in secure enclosures (bomas) where they are adjusting to their new environment and bonding, and will be released over the coming weeks and months. Africa’s wildlife has suffered immensely in recent decades, and the lion population has crashed by more than 40% since 1993. Just 100 years ago, more than 200,000 lions lived in Africa- today, best estimates put them at fewer than 20,000. “Very simply, if a park is not being managed then it will be lost, we have two options, one is we allow these places to disappear. The other is we make our own plan,” says CEO of @africanparksnetwork, Peter Fearnhead who was recently quoted by the Washington Post (see link in our bio). By working closely with the Government of Malawi, the local community as with critical support from the Dutch Government, @lionrecovery and @leonardodicapriofdn – we are making a plan to restore the species to protected areas across Africa for the benefit of future generations. #AfricanParks #NaturesReturn #Conservation #Wildlife #Liwonde #Majete #Lions #Predators @africanparksnetwork #DutchGovernment, @lionrecovery and @leonardodicapriofdn @Zakouma_national_park
#newspaper


0

In absolute love with this photo mama and cubs #lions so beautiful #bigcats #savebigcats .. read the story please Regrann from @natgeo - @natgeo photo by @stevewinterphoto with @africanparksnetwork

Lions in Malawi, the ‘warm heart of Africa’, are making a comeback! The country’s pride is growing as six wild lions have been safely transported from South Africa to their new homes in Majete Wildlife Reserve and Liwonde National Park to help revive the parks’ predator populations. Just last week, four of these lions (two males and two females) joined the two male lions who were translocated to Liwonde in February this year. Lions were last seen in the park over four years ago, and it had been even longer since a breeding population lived in the park. We moved the other two males to Majete Wildlife Reserve to improve the genetic diversity of the current lion population there. All lions are in secure enclosures (bomas) where they are adjusting to their new environment and bonding, and will be released over the coming weeks and months. Africa’s wildlife has suffered immensely in recent decades, and the lion population has crashed by more than 40% since 1993. Just 100 years ago, more than 200,000 lions lived in Africa- today, best estimates put them at fewer than 20,000. “Very simply, if a park is not being managed then it will be lost, we have two options, one is we allow these places to disappear. The other is we make our own plan,” says CEO of @africanparksnetwork, Peter Fearnhead who was recently quoted by the Washington Post (see link in our bio). By working closely with the Government of Malawi, the local community as with critical support from the Dutch Government, @lionrecovery and @leonardodicapriofdn – we are making a plan to restore the species to protected areas across Africa for the benefit of future generations. #AfricanParks #NaturesReturn #Conservation #Wildlife #Liwonde #Majete #Lions #Predators @africanparksnetwork #DutchGovernment, @lionrecovery and @leonardodicapriofdn @Zakouma_national_park


0

@Regrann from @natgeo: @natgeo photo by @stevewinterphoto with @africanparksnetwork

Lions in Malawi, the ‘warm heart of Africa’, are making a comeback! The country’s pride is growing as six wild lions have been safely transported from South Africa to their new homes in Majete Wildlife Reserve and Liwonde National Park to help revive the parks’ predator populations. Just last week, four of these lions (two males and two females) joined the two male lions who were translocated to Liwonde in February this year. Lions were last seen in the park over four years ago, and it had been even longer since a breeding population lived in the park. We moved the other two males to Majete Wildlife Reserve to improve the genetic diversity of the current lion population there. All lions are in secure enclosures (bomas) where they are adjusting to their new environment and bonding, and will be released over the coming weeks and months. Africa’s wildlife has suffered immensely in recent decades, and the lion population has crashed by more than 40% since 1993. Just 100 years ago, more than 200,000 lions lived in Africa- today, best estimates put them at fewer than 20,000. “Very simply, if a park is not being managed then it will be lost, we have two options, one is we allow these places to disappear. The other is we make our own plan,” says CEO of @africanparksnetwork, Peter Fearnhead who was recently quoted by the Washington Post (see link in our bio). By working closely with the Government of Malawi, the local community as with critical support from the Dutch Government, @lionrecovery and @leonardodicapriofdn – we are making a plan to restore the species to protected areas across Africa for the benefit of future generations. #AfricanParks #NaturesReturn #Conservation #Wildlife #Liwonde #Majete #Lions #Predators @africanparksnetwork #DutchGovernment, @lionrecovery and @leonardodicapriofdn @Zakouma_national_park


0

@natgeo photo by @stevewinterphoto with @africanparksnetwork

Lions in Malawi, the ‘warm heart of Africa’, are making a comeback! The country’s pride is growing as six wild lions have been safely transported from South Africa to their new homes in Majete Wildlife Reserve and Liwonde National Park to help revive the parks’ predator populations. Just last week, four of these lions (two males and two females) joined the two male lions who were translocated to Liwonde in February this year. Lions were last seen in the park over four years ago, and it had been even longer since a breeding population lived in the park. We moved the other two males to Majete Wildlife Reserve to improve the genetic diversity of the current lion population there. All lions are in secure enclosures (bomas) where they are adjusting to their new environment and bonding, and will be released over the coming weeks and months. Africa’s wildlife has suffered immensely in recent decades, and the lion population has crashed by more than 40% since 1993. Just 100 years ago, more than 200,000 lions lived in Africa- today, best estimates put them at fewer than 20,000. “Very simply, if a park is not being managed then it will be lost, we have two options, one is we allow these places to disappear. The other is we make our own plan,” says CEO of @africanparksnetwork, Peter Fearnhead who was recently quoted by the Washington Post (see link in our bio). By working closely with the Government of Malawi, the local community as with critical support from the Dutch Government, @lionrecovery and @leonardodicapriofdn – we are making a plan to restore the species to protected areas across Africa for the benefit of future generations. #AfricanParks #NaturesReturn #Conservation #Wildlife #Liwonde #Majete #Lions #Predators @africanparksnetwork #DutchGovernment, @lionrecovery and @leonardodicapriofdn @Zakouma_national_park


1,327

@natgeo photo by @stevewinterphoto with @africanparksnetwork

Lions in Malawi, the ‘warm heart of Africa’, are making a comeback! The country’s pride is growing as six wild lions have been safely transported from South Africa to their new homes in Majete Wildlife Reserve and Liwonde National Park to help revive the parks’ predator populations. Just last week, four of these lions (two males and two females) joined the two male lions who were translocated to Liwonde in February this year. Lions were last seen in the park over four years ago, and it had been even longer since a breeding population lived in the park. We moved the other two males to Majete Wildlife Reserve to improve the genetic diversity of the current lion population there. All lions are in secure enclosures (bomas) where they are adjusting to their new environment and bonding, and will be released over the coming weeks and months. Africa’s wildlife has suffered immensely in recent decades, and the lion population has crashed by more than 40% since 1993. Just 100 years ago, more than 200,000 lions lived in Africa- today, best estimates put them at fewer than 20,000. “Very simply, if a park is not being managed then it will be lost, we have two options, one is we allow these places to disappear. The other is we make our own plan,” says CEO of @africanparksnetwork, Peter Fearnhead who was recently quoted by the Washington Post (see link in our bio). By working closely with the Government of Malawi, the local community as with critical support from the Dutch Government, @lionrecovery and @leonardodicapriofdn – we are making a plan to restore the species to protected areas across Africa for the benefit of future generations. #AfricanParks #NaturesReturn #Conservation #Wildlife #Liwonde #Majete #Lions #Predators @africanparksnetwork #DutchGovernment, @lionrecovery and @leonardodicapriofdn @reddigitalcinema #reddigitalcinema @CanonUSA #CanonUSA @zakouma_national_park


73

Lions in Malawi, the ‘warm heart of Africa’, are making a comeback! The country’s pride is growing as six wild lions have been safely transported from South Africa to their new homes in Majete Wildlife Reserve and Liwonde National Park to help revive the parks’ predator populations. Just last week, four of these lions (two males and two females) joined the two male lions who were translocated to Liwonde in February this year. Lions were last seen in the park over four years ago, and it had been even longer since a breeding population lived in the park. We moved the other two males to Majete Wildlife Reserve to improve the genetic diversity of the current lion population there. All lions are in secure enclosures (bomas) where they are adjusting to their new environment and bonding, and will be released over the coming weeks and months. Africa’s wildlife has suffered immensely in recent decades, and the lion population has crashed by more than 40% since 1993. Just 100 years ago, more than 200,000 lions lived in Africa- today, best estimates put them at fewer than 20,000. “Very simply, if a park is not being managed then it will be lost, we have two options, one is we allow these places to disappear. The other is we make our own plan,” says CEO of @africanparksnetwork, Peter Fearnhead who was recently quoted by the Washington Post (see link in our bio). By working closely with the Government of Malawi, the local community as with critical support from the Dutch Government, @lionrecovery and @leonardodicapriofdn – we are making a plan to restore the species to protected areas across Africa for the benefit of future generations. Photo: @stevewinterphoto #AfricanParks #NaturesReturn #Conservation #Wildlife #Liwonde #Majete #Lions #Predators


25

#Repost @africanparksnetwork with @get_repost
・・・
Since 2017, elephants have been on the rise for the first time in over a decade in @zakouma_national_park - last year we counted 81 elephant calves under the age of three years old; in 2011 we counted just one. Due to increased security and the near elimination of poaching, elephants are able to be elephants once again; they are breeding and raising their young; and young and growing calves are now a common sight. This is the park where just last week we brought the first six black rhinos back in a historic move of returning the species to the country of Chad after a near 50-year absence. Our vision is for them to breed and thrive, like Zakouma’s elephants, bringing more beautiful life back to this stunning landscape.
Happy Mother’s Day
#mothersday #goodnews #naturesreturn #zakouma #rhinomove #rhinos #elephants #africanparks


0

Since 2017, elephants have been on the rise for the first time in over a decade in @zakouma_national_park - last year we counted 81 elephant calves under the age of three years old; in 2011 we counted just one. Due to increased security and the near elimination of poaching, elephants are able to be elephants once again; they are breeding and raising their young; and young and growing calves are now a common sight. This is the park where just last week we brought the first six black rhinos back in a historic move of returning the species to the country of Chad after a near 50-year absence. Our vision is for them to breed and thrive, like Zakouma’s elephants, bringing more beautiful life back to this stunning landscape.
Happy Mother’s Day
#mothersday #goodnews #naturesreturn #zakouma #rhinomove #rhinos #elephants #africanparks


32

Zakouma’s bull elephants come to the Park Managers house daily - where they bypass the waterhole to wait patiently, and in turn, to be watered from the hose. It’s a minor miracle - in a place where 4,000 elephants were slaughtered for their tusks between 2002-2010 - since then, in eight years, we’ve lost only 23. Calves are being born, and elephants are on the rise for the first time in over a decade. These bulls no doubt were alive and remember those times - but here redemption for both people and animals reigns... and these magnificent creatures have forgiven, and trust us once again.
#elephants #zakouma #africanparks #communityconservation #naturesreturn


2

#Repost @dp4k.m_reincarnated with @get_repost
・・・
#Repost @africanparksnetwork
PRECIOUS CARGO
A rare black rhino is released from his crate into a closely guarded enclosure at @zakouma_national_park in Chad. He is the first wild rhino to step foot in the park in 50 years and will roam the extraordinary landscape alongside the other five black rhinos who landed safely in the park on 4 May. Enormous care has been taken throughout the 3,000-mile journey to ensure their safety, and this continued when they landed in their new home and met their protectors – a specially trained group of Zakouma’s rangers – who are now the rhino monitoring unit who will be tracking and protecting them 24/7. These rangers have been the driving force who have secured the park over the past seven years for the rhinos return – creating a safe haven for some of Central Africa’s most threatened wildlife. Their commitment is unwavering and is paving a brighter future for the people and wildlife who live here. Follow their journey at www.rhinomove.org #naturesreturn #rhinosreturn #africanparks #conservation #wildlife #animalonearth #zakouma #chad


0

Repost @dp4k.m_reincarnated - #Repost @africanparksnetwork
PRECIOUS CARGO
A rare black rhino is released from his crate into a closely guarded enclosure at @zakouma_national_park in Chad. He is the first wild rhino to step foot in the park in 50 years and will roam the extraordinary landscape alongside the other five black rhinos who landed safely in the park on 4 May. Enormous care has been taken throughout the 3,000-mile journey to ensure their safety, and this continued when they landed in their new home and met their protectors – a specially trained group of Zakouma’s rangers – who are now the rhino monitoring unit who will be tracking and protecting them 24/7. These rangers have been the driving force who have secured the park over the past seven years for the rhinos return – creating a safe haven for some of Central Africa’s most threatened wildlife. Their commitment is unwavering and is paving a brighter future for the people and wildlife who live here. Follow their journey at www.rhinomove.org #naturesreturn #rhinosreturn #africanparks #conservation #wildlife #animalonearth #zakouma #chad #video #instavideo #videooftheday #worldnews #news #animalsofinstagram #instaanimal #animals #animales #greatwork #amazingpeople #rhino #rhinos #poaching #worthmorealive


9

#Repost @africanparksnetwork
PRECIOUS CARGO
A rare black rhino is released from his crate into a closely guarded enclosure at @zakouma_national_park in Chad. He is the first wild rhino to step foot in the park in 50 years and will roam the extraordinary landscape alongside the other five black rhinos who landed safely in the park on 4 May. Enormous care has been taken throughout the 3,000-mile journey to ensure their safety, and this continued when they landed in their new home and met their protectors – a specially trained group of Zakouma’s rangers – who are now the rhino monitoring unit who will be tracking and protecting them 24/7. These rangers have been the driving force who have secured the park over the past seven years for the rhinos return – creating a safe haven for some of Central Africa’s most threatened wildlife. Their commitment is unwavering and is paving a brighter future for the people and wildlife who live here. Follow their journey at www.rhinomove.org #naturesreturn #rhinosreturn #africanparks #conservation #wildlife #animalonearth #zakouma #chad


4

Precious cargo: A rare black rhino is released from his crate into a closely guarded enclosure at @zakouma_national_park in Chad. He is the first wild rhino to step foot in the park in 50 years and will roam the extraordinary landscape alongside the other five black rhinos who landed safely in the park on 4 May. Enormous care has been taken throughout the 3,000-mile journey to ensure their safety, and this continued when they landed in their new home and met their protectors – a specially trained group of Zakouma’s rangers – who are now the rhino monitoring unit who will be tracking and protecting them 24/7. These rangers have been the driving force who have secured the park over the past seven years for the rhinos return – creating a safe haven for some of Central Africa’s most threatened wildlife. Their commitment is unwavering and is paving a brighter future for the people and wildlife who live here. Follow their journey at www.rhinomove.org #naturesreturn #rhinosreturn #africanparks #conservation #wildlife #animalonearth #zakouma #chad @upliftinganimals


41

#goodnews 💜
・・・
Sleeping lions: an anesthetized lion, one of several to be reintroduced to Liwonde, is cared for by rangers before being woken up. Liwonde in Malawi is undergoing a revival. In February, we reintroduced lions back to the park after the last lion was seen over four years ago; it has been even longer since a breeding population lived in the park. More lions will be joining throughout the year to help create a small but growing pride. Cheetahs were also reintroduced to the park last year after a 100-year absence from the park, and having gone locally extinct in Malawi 20 years ago. And two of the females have since had cubs. Since African Parks assumed management of Liwonde in August 2015, in partnership with the DNPW, our rangers have removed over 31,000 wire snares; poaching has been reduced; human Wildlife conflict mitigated; the number of tourists is up 25% and revenue has increased by 70% since 2016, which goes back to support the park and local communities. And last Thursday we announced that we had just signed on the 15th park to fall under our management, Mangochi Forest Reserve, which adjoins Liwonde and gives the protected and rising wildlife populations even more room to grow. In just two short years, Liwonde has been given a second chance, and it is being restored and transformed, right before our very eyes.
Photo by @stevewinterphoto
#Liwonde #Lions #Conservation #AfricanParks #Malawi #goodnews #naturesreturn


1

A herd of elephants moves into the sunset in Majete Wildlife Reserve in Malawi.
Elephants were hunted out of Majete in the 1990’s until 2006, when African Parks reintroduced them – and they grew to a population of over 400. In 2017, we took 150 of them to help repopulate Nkhotakota, 650km north, whose elephants had all been nearly poached out. Majete was able to help give life to Nkhotakota, a park that shared the same painful past, but now holds the same hopeful future.
Photo by @pedromcbride
#majete #malawi #AfricanParks #Conservation #naturesreturn #hope #goodnews #500elephants


14

🙏🏻🙏🏻🙏🏻 #Repost @empowersafrica
・・・
News just in from the awesome @africanparksnetwork – not only have they reintroduced several lion back into Liwonde National Park in Malawi after a four-year absence, they have just assumed management of a 15th park on the continent, Mangochi Forest Reserve, also in Malawi.

Congratulations African Parks! Thank you for all the work you do and we’re looking forward to the developments that lie in store, both in Malawi and across Africa.
・・・
#repost Sleeping lions: an anesthetized lion, one of several to be reintroduced to Liwonde, is cared for by rangers before being woken up. Liwonde in Malawi is undergoing a revival. In February, we reintroduced lions back to the park after the last lion was seen over four years ago; it has been even longer since a breeding population lived in the park. More lions will be joining throughout the year to help create a small but growing pride. Cheetahs were also reintroduced to the park last year after a 100-year absence from the park, and having gone locally extinct in Malawi 20 years ago. And two of the females have since had cubs. Since African Parks assumed management of Liwonde in August 2015, in partnership with the DNPW, our rangers have removed over 31,000 wire snares; poaching has been reduced; human Wildlife conflict mitigated; the number of tourists is up 25% and revenue has increased by 70% since 2016, which goes back to support the park and local communities. And last Thursday we announced that we had just signed on the 15th park to fall under our management, Mangochi Forest Reserve, which adjoins Liwonde and gives the protected and rising wildlife populations even more room to grow. In just two short years, Liwonde has been given a second chance, and it is being restored and transformed, right before our very eyes.
Photo by @stevewinterphoto
#Liwonde #Lions #Conservation #AfricanParks #Malawi #goodnews #naturesreturn


9

News just in from the awesome @africanparksnetwork – not only have they reintroduced several lion back into Liwonde National Park in Malawi after a four-year absence, they have just assumed management of a 15th park on the continent, Mangochi Forest Reserve, also in Malawi.

Congratulations African Parks! Thank you for all the work you do and we’re looking forward to the developments that lie in store, both in Malawi and across Africa.
・・・
#repost Sleeping lions: an anesthetized lion, one of several to be reintroduced to Liwonde, is cared for by rangers before being woken up. Liwonde in Malawi is undergoing a revival. In February, we reintroduced lions back to the park after the last lion was seen over four years ago; it has been even longer since a breeding population lived in the park. More lions will be joining throughout the year to help create a small but growing pride. Cheetahs were also reintroduced to the park last year after a 100-year absence from the park, and having gone locally extinct in Malawi 20 years ago. And two of the females have since had cubs. Since African Parks assumed management of Liwonde in August 2015, in partnership with the DNPW, our rangers have removed over 31,000 wire snares; poaching has been reduced; human Wildlife conflict mitigated; the number of tourists is up 25% and revenue has increased by 70% since 2016, which goes back to support the park and local communities. And last Thursday we announced that we had just signed on the 15th park to fall under our management, Mangochi Forest Reserve, which adjoins Liwonde and gives the protected and rising wildlife populations even more room to grow. In just two short years, Liwonde has been given a second chance, and it is being restored and transformed, right before our very eyes.
Photo by @stevewinterphoto
#Liwonde #Lions #Conservation #AfricanParks #Malawi #goodnews #naturesreturn


7

Sleeping lions: an anesthetized lion, one of several to be reintroduced to Liwonde, is cared for by rangers before being woken up. Liwonde in Malawi is undergoing a revival. In February, we reintroduced lions back to the park after the last lion was seen over four years ago; it has been even longer since a breeding population lived in the park. More lions will be joining throughout the year to help create a small but growing pride. Cheetahs were also reintroduced to the park last year after a 100-year absence from the park, and having gone locally extinct in Malawi 20 years ago. And two of the females have since had cubs. Since African Parks assumed management of Liwonde in August 2015, in partnership with the DNPW, our rangers have removed over 31,000 wire snares; poaching has been reduced; human Wildlife conflict mitigated; the number of tourists is up 25% and revenue has increased by 70% since 2016, which goes back to support the park and local communities. And last Thursday we announced that we had just signed on the 15th park to fall under our management, Mangochi Forest Reserve, which adjoins Liwonde and gives the protected and rising wildlife populations even more room to grow. In just two short years, Liwonde has been given a second chance, and it is being restored and transformed, right before our very eyes.
Photo by @stevewinterphoto
#Liwonde #Lions #Conservation #AfricanParks #Malawi #goodnews #naturesreturn


34

The end of the page