#giantsnakes

Instagram photos and videos

#giantsnakes#snakesofinstagram#amazon#anacondas#peru#scalesandskin#greenanaconda#anaconda#krazykrisballpythonz#reptiles#greenanacondas#bigsnakes#snakes#anacondalove#taylorswift#Repost#python#snake#babyanacondas#green#reticulatedpython#reptilesofinstagram#beautifulsnakes#reptile#nofilter#giant#reputationstadiumtour

Hashtags #giantsnakes for Instagram

0.1 GREEN ANACONDA (CHLOE)
My Girl CHLOE Is Growing So Nicely... I can not wait until I can breed her she is so beautiful... showing off her thickness
#krazykrisballpythonz #greenanaconda #greenanacondasofinstagram #greenanacondaofig #giantsnakes #bigsnakes #lovelygiants


2

0.1 GREEN ANACONDA (IZABELLA)
My lovely girl is getting nice and big love this girl so much...
#krazykrisballpythonz #greenanaconda #greenanacondas #giantsnakes #amazon #eunectesmurinus #bigsnakes


0

1.0 GREEN ANACONDA (PICKLES)
My smallest out of all my green anacondas he is just a baby and I love this guy. I have 2 males...
#krazykrisballpythonz #greenanaconda #greenanacondas #giantsnakes #bigsnakes #bestsnakesever #anacondas #anacondasofinstagram


2

#Repost @natgeo
・・・
Photo @tbfrost
This is what happens to most snakes when they encounter humans: they have their heads chopped off with shovels or hoes or in this case a machete. Growing up in Virginia I vividly remember neighbors cutting the heads off every snake they saw. Much of the time the person thought it was funny and somehow manly that they killed a creature 1000 Times smaller than them, which is puzzling to me. In almost every case the person thought the snake was venomous (not that a venomous snake deserves that fate either) but usually it was a black rat snake or rough brown water snake, which are completely harmless and important to controlling rodent populations which are far more dangerous to human health. This culture of killing snakes doesn’t just exist in the United States, believe me, it is healthy and alive almost everywhere I’ve been, including Peru, where people typically kill any snake they see. In some cases, with anacondas anyways, they keep the dried heads in their homes as good luck charms. The dried head you see in the hands of @paulrosolie is one such head, taken from a 15 foot female anaconda with the belief it would bring good luck. As far as I could tell the man who killed this snake and took the head has had no change in luck. This is the mission @paulrosolie and I are on: to deconstruct the myth snakes are evil and one by one convince people snakes are better off alive, for all involved. Moving forward , Paul and I are working to set up a non profit fund to reimburse people in Puerto Maldonado, Peru who lose a chicken or goat or whatever to anaconda. This is an experiment we hope makes some difference. But we need your help . The catch of course is we won’t reimburse anyone unless they have proof the anaconda wasn’t harmed and was allowed to go on its way, belly full. In cases where it makes sense we have a team of local Peruvians in place who love snakes and they will relocate them far from homes.
To learn more about how we are trying to help anacondas , and other snakes too, I am @tbfrost
#snakesofinstagram #reptiles #anacondas #anaconda #giantsnakes #amazon #peru #scalesandskin


0

Caught my first wild Burmese python out in the Everglades and almost a 10 footer at that! 😍 #invasivespecies #livinginparadise #evergladesherping #burmesepython #giantsnakes #reptileaddict


9

#Repost @natgeo (@get_repost)
・・・
Photo @tbfrost
This is what happens to most snakes when they encounter humans: they have their heads chopped off with shovels or hoes or in this case a machete. Growing up in Virginia I vividly remember neighbors cutting the heads off every snake they saw. Much of the time the person thought it was funny and somehow manly that they killed a creature 1000 Times smaller than them, which is puzzling to me. In almost every case the person thought the snake was venomous (not that a venomous snake deserves that fate either) but usually it was a black rat snake or rough brown water snake, which are completely harmless and important to controlling rodent populations which are far more dangerous to human health. This culture of killing snakes doesn’t just exist in the United States, believe me, it is healthy and alive almost everywhere I’ve been, including Peru, where people typically kill any snake they see. In some cases, with anacondas anyways, they keep the dried heads in their homes as good luck charms. The dried head you see in the hands of @paulrosolie is one such head, taken from a 15 foot female anaconda with the belief it would bring good luck. As far as I could tell the man who killed this snake and took the head has had no change in luck. This is the mission @paulrosolie and I are on: to deconstruct the myth snakes are evil and one by one convince people snakes are better off alive, for all involved. Moving forward , Paul and I are working to set up a non profit fund to reimburse people in Puerto Maldonado, Peru who lose a chicken or goat or whatever to anaconda. This is an experiment we hope makes some difference. But we need your help . The catch of course is we won’t reimburse anyone unless they have proof the anaconda wasn’t harmed and was allowed to go on its way, belly full. In cases where it makes sense we have a team of local Peruvians in place who love snakes and they will relocate them far from homes.
To learn more about how we are trying to help anacondas , and other snakes too, I am @tbfrost
#snakesofinstagram #snakes #cobras #reptiles #anacondas #anaconda #giantsnakes #amazon #peru #scalesandskin


0

Say it louder for the people in the back! #Repost @natgeo (@get_repost)
・・・
Photo @tbfrost
This is what happens to most snakes when they encounter humans: they have their heads chopped off with shovels or hoes or in this case a machete. Growing up in Virginia I vividly remember neighbors cutting the heads off every snake they saw. Much of the time the person thought it was funny and somehow manly that they killed a creature 1000 Times smaller than them, which is puzzling to me. In almost every case the person thought the snake was venomous (not that a venomous snake deserves that fate either) but usually it was a black rat snake or rough brown water snake, which are completely harmless and important to controlling rodent populations which are far more dangerous to human health. This culture of killing snakes doesn’t just exist in the United States, believe me, it is healthy and alive almost everywhere I’ve been, including Peru, where people typically kill any snake they see. In some cases, with anacondas anyways, they keep the dried heads in their homes as good luck charms. The dried head you see in the hands of @paulrosolie is one such head, taken from a 15 foot female anaconda with the belief it would bring good luck. As far as I could tell the man who killed this snake and took the head has had no change in luck. This is the mission @paulrosolie and I are on: to deconstruct the myth snakes are evil and one by one convince people snakes are better off alive, for all involved. Moving forward , Paul and I are working to set up a non profit fund to reimburse people in Puerto Maldonado, Peru who lose a chicken or goat or whatever to anaconda. This is an experiment we hope makes some difference. But we need your help . The catch of course is we won’t reimburse anyone unless they have proof the anaconda wasn’t harmed and was allowed to go on its way, belly full. In cases where it makes sense we have a team of local Peruvians in place who love snakes and they will relocate them far from homes.
To learn more about how we are trying to help anacondas , and other snakes too, I am @tbfrost
#snakesofinstagram #reptiles #anacondas #anaconda #giantsnakes #amazon #peru #s


0

Photo @tbfrost
This is what happens to most snakes when they encounter humans: they have their heads chopped off with shovels or hoes or in this case a machete. Growing up in Virginia I vividly remember neighbors cutting the heads off every snake they saw. Much of the time the person thought it was funny and somehow manly that they killed a creature 1000 Times smaller than them, which is puzzling to me. In almost every case the person thought the snake was venomous (not that a venomous snake deserves that fate either) but usually it was a black rat snake or rough brown water snake, which are completely harmless and important to controlling rodent populations which are far more dangerous to human health. This culture of killing snakes doesn’t just exist in the United States, believe me, it is healthy and alive almost everywhere I’ve been, including Peru, where people typically kill any snake they see. In some cases, with anacondas anyways, they keep the dried heads in their homes as good luck charms. The dried head you see in the hands of @paulrosolie is one such head, taken from a 15 foot female anaconda with the belief it would bring good luck. As far as I could tell the man who killed this snake and took the head has had no change in luck. This is the mission @paulrosolie and I are on: to deconstruct the myth snakes are evil and one by one convince people snakes are better off alive, for all involved. Moving forward , Paul and I are working to set up a non profit fund to reimburse people in Puerto Maldonado, Peru who lose a chicken or goat or whatever to anaconda. This is an experiment we hope makes some difference. But we need your help . The catch of course is we won’t reimburse anyone unless they have proof the anaconda wasn’t harmed and was allowed to go on its way, belly full. In cases where it makes sense we have a team of local Peruvians in place who love snakes and they will relocate them far from homes.
#snakesofinstagram #reptiles #anacondas #anaconda #giantsnakes #amazon #peru #scalesandskin #nationalgeographic #news_gateway


0

#Repost @natgeo with @get_repost
・・・
Photo @tbfrost
This is what happens to most snakes when they encounter humans: they have their heads chopped off with shovels or hoes or in this case a machete. Growing up in Virginia I vividly remember neighbors cutting the heads off every snake they saw. Much of the time the person thought it was funny and somehow manly that they killed a creature 1000 Times smaller than them, which is puzzling to me. In almost every case the person thought the snake was venomous (not that a venomous snake deserves that fate either) but usually it was a black rat snake or rough brown water snake, which are completely harmless and important to controlling rodent populations which are far more dangerous to human health. This culture of killing snakes doesn’t just exist in the United States, believe me, it is healthy and alive almost everywhere I’ve been, including Peru, where people typically kill any snake they see. In some cases, with anacondas anyways, they keep the dried heads in their homes as good luck charms. The dried head you see in the hands of @paulrosolie is one such head, taken from a 15 foot female anaconda with the belief it would bring good luck. As far as I could tell the man who killed this snake and took the head has had no change in luck. This is the mission @paulrosolie and I are on: to deconstruct the myth snakes are evil and one by one convince people snakes are better off alive, for all involved. Moving forward , Paul and I are working to set up a non profit fund to reimburse people in Puerto Maldonado, Peru who lose a chicken or goat or whatever to anaconda. This is an experiment we hope makes some difference. But we need your help . The catch of course is we won’t reimburse anyone unless they have proof the anaconda wasn’t harmed and was allowed to go on its way, belly full. In cases where it makes sense we have a team of local Peruvians in place who love snakes and they will relocate them far from homes.
To learn more about how we are trying to help anacondas , and other snakes too, I am @tbfrost
#snakesofinstagram #reptiles #anacondas #anaconda #giantsnakes #amazon #peru #scalesandskin


0

#Repost @natgeo with @get_repost
・・・
🤬
제발좀..사람들은 언제쯤 바뀔까요?
.
This is what happens to most snakes when they encounter humans: they have their heads chopped off with shovels or hoes or in this case a machete. Growing up in Virginia I vividly remember neighbors cutting the heads off every snake they saw. Much of the time the person thought it was funny and somehow manly that they killed a creature 1000 Times smaller than them, which is puzzling to me. In almost every case the person thought the snake was venomous (not that a venomous snake deserves that fate either) but usually it was a black rat snake or rough brown water snake, which are completely harmless and important to controlling rodent populations which are far more dangerous to human health. This culture of killing snakes doesn’t just exist in the United States, believe me, it is healthy and alive almost everywhere I’ve been, including Peru, where people typically kill any snake they see. In some cases, with anacondas anyways, they keep the dried heads in their homes as good luck charms. The dried head you see in the hands of @paulrosolie is one such head, taken from a 15 foot female anaconda with the belief it would bring good luck. As far as I could tell the man who killed this snake and took the head has had no change in luck. This is the mission @paulrosolie and I are on: to deconstruct the myth snakes are evil and one by one convince people snakes are better off alive, for all involved. Moving forward , Paul and I are working to set up a non profit fund to reimburse people in Puerto Maldonado, Peru who lose a chicken or goat or whatever to anaconda. This is an experiment we hope makes some difference. But we need your help . The catch of course is we won’t reimburse anyone unless they have proof the anaconda wasn’t harmed and was allowed to go on its way, belly full. In cases where it makes sense we have a team of local Peruvians in place who love snakes and they will relocate them far from homes.
To learn more about how we are trying to help anacondas , and other snakes too, I am @tbfrost
#snakesofinstagram #reptiles #anacondas #anaconda #giantsnakes #amazon #peru #scalesandskin


3

Regrann from @natgeo - Photo @tbfrost
This is what happens to most snakes when they encounter humans: they have their heads chopped off with shovels or hoes or in this case a machete. Growing up in Virginia I vividly remember neighbors cutting the heads off every snake they saw. Much of the time the person thought it was funny and somehow manly that they killed a creature 1000 Times smaller than them, which is puzzling to me. In almost every case the person thought the snake was venomous (not that a venomous snake deserves that fate either) but usually it was a black rat snake or rough brown water snake, which are completely harmless and important to controlling rodent populations which are far more dangerous to human health. This culture of killing snakes doesn’t just exist in the United States, believe me, it is healthy and alive almost everywhere I’ve been, including Peru, where people typically kill any snake they see. In some cases, with anacondas anyways, they keep the dried heads in their homes as good luck charms. The dried head you see in the hands of @paulrosolie is one such head, taken from a 15 foot female anaconda with the belief it would bring good luck. As far as I could tell the man who killed this snake and took the head has had no change in luck. This is the mission @paulrosolie and I are on: to deconstruct the myth snakes are evil and one by one convince people snakes are better off alive, for all involved. Moving forward , Paul and I are working to set up a non profit fund to reimburse people in Puerto Maldonado, Peru who lose a chicken or goat or whatever to anaconda. This is an experiment we hope makes some difference. But we need your help . The catch of course is we won’t reimburse anyone unless they have proof the anaconda wasn’t harmed and was allowed to go on its way, belly full. In cases where it makes sense we have a team of local Peruvians in place who love snakes and they will relocate them far from homes.
To learn more about how we are trying to help anacondas , and other snakes too, I am @tbfrost
#snakesofinstagram #reptiles #anacondas #anaconda #giantsnakes #amazon #peru #scalesandskin - #regrann


0

Really great post!#Repost @natgeo (@get_repost)
・・・
Photo @tbfrost
This is what happens to most snakes when they encounter humans: they have their heads chopped off with shovels or hoes or in this case a machete. Growing up in Virginia I vividly remember neighbors cutting the heads off every snake they saw. Much of the time the person thought it was funny and somehow manly that they killed a creature 1000 Times smaller than them, which is puzzling to me. In almost every case the person thought the snake was venomous (not that a venomous snake deserves that fate either) but usually it was a black rat snake or rough brown water snake, which are completely harmless and important to controlling rodent populations which are far more dangerous to human health. This culture of killing snakes doesn’t just exist in the United States, believe me, it is healthy and alive almost everywhere I’ve been, including Peru, where people typically kill any snake they see. In some cases, with anacondas anyways, they keep the dried heads in their homes as good luck charms. The dried head you see in the hands of @paulrosolie is one such head, taken from a 15 foot female anaconda with the belief it would bring good luck. As far as I could tell the man who killed this snake and took the head has had no change in luck. This is the mission @paulrosolie and I are on: to deconstruct the myth snakes are evil and one by one convince people snakes are better off alive, for all involved. Moving forward , Paul and I are working to set up a non profit fund to reimburse people in Puerto Maldonado, Peru who lose a chicken or goat or whatever to anaconda. This is an experiment we hope makes some difference. But we need your help . The catch of course is we won’t reimburse anyone unless they have proof the anaconda wasn’t harmed and was allowed to go on its way, belly full. In cases where it makes sense we have a team of local Peruvians in place who love snakes and they will relocate them far from homes.
To learn more about how we are trying to help anacondas , and other snakes too, I am @tbfrost
#snakesofinstagram #reptiles #anacondas #anaconda #giantsnakes #amazon #peru #scalesandskin


2

Photo @tbfrost
This is what happens to most snakes when they encounter humans: they have their heads chopped off with shovels or hoes or in this case a machete. Growing up in Virginia I vividly remember neighbors cutting the heads off every snake they saw. Much of the time the person thought it was funny and somehow manly that they killed a creature 1000 Times smaller than them, which is puzzling to me. In almost every case the person thought the snake was venomous (not that a venomous snake deserves that fate either) but usually it was a black rat snake or rough brown water snake, which are completely harmless and important to controlling rodent populations which are far more dangerous to human health. This culture of killing snakes doesn’t just exist in the United States, believe me, it is healthy and alive almost everywhere I’ve been, including Peru, where people typically kill any snake they see. In some cases, with anacondas anyways, they keep the dried heads in their homes as good luck charms. The dried head you see in the hands of @paulrosolie is one such head, taken from a 15 foot female anaconda with the belief it would bring good luck. As far as I could tell the man who killed this snake and took the head has had no change in luck. This is the mission @paulrosolie and I are on: to deconstruct the myth snakes are evil and one by one convince people snakes are better off alive, for all involved. Moving forward , Paul and I are working to set up a non profit fund to reimburse people in Puerto Maldonado, Peru who lose a chicken or goat or whatever to anaconda. This is an experiment we hope makes some difference. But we need your help . The catch of course is we won’t reimburse anyone unless they have proof the anaconda wasn’t harmed and was allowed to go on its way, belly full. In cases where it makes sense we have a team of local Peruvians in place who love snakes and they will relocate them far from homes.
To learn more about how we are trying to help anacondas , and other snakes too, I am @tbfrost
#snakesofinstagram #reptiles #anacondas #anaconda #giantsnakes #amazon #peru #scalesandskin


2,954

My ancient creatures will take over your world under neither ground humans like & aliens like from above #dragons #giantsnakes #6naga 🧠 #PHARMAKIA for......... 🧞‍♂️🧚🏽‍♂️🧙🏽‍♂️ #GraphicDesign #Artist #Art #Photography
#WallStreetMoneyNeverSleep #Buisness #Actor #Family #nofilter #Deity #Illuminati #Immortals #Covenant #God #Pharoah 🎻 ♉️ 🔯 🔺 ⚡️👺📿🐜☦️👁️📺🖖🏽🔮👼🏽👌🏽🙏🏽🖕🏽🐉☄️📱🖥️⌚️🗻 💎 #👽 #Alien #Annunaki #British #Buddha #Ra #ispwich #muk


0

My ancient creatures will take over your world under neither ground humans like & aliens like from above #dragons #giantsnakes #6naga 🧠 #PHARMAKIA for......... 🧞‍♂️🧚🏽‍♂️🧙🏽‍♂️ #GraphicDesign #Artist #Art #Photography
#WallStreetMoneyNeverSleep #Buisness #Actor #Family #nofilter #Deity #Illuminati #Immortals #Covenant #God #Pharoah 🎻 ♉️ 🔯 🔺 ⚡️👺📿🐜☦️👁️📺🖖🏽🔮👼🏽👌🏽🙏🏽🖕🏽🐉☄️📱🖥️⌚️🗻 💎 #👽 #Alien #Annunaki #British #Buddha #Ra #ispwich #muk


0

My ancient creatures will take over your world under neither ground humans like & aliens like from above #dragons #giantsnakes #6naga 🧠 #PHARMAKIA for......... 🧞‍♂️🧚🏽‍♂️🧙🏽‍♂️ #GraphicDesign #Artist #Art #Photography
#WallStreetMoneyNeverSleep #Buisness #Actor #Family #nofilter #Deity #Illuminati #Immortals #Covenant #God #Pharoah 🎻 ♉️ 🔯 🔺 ⚡️👺📿🐜☦️👁️📺🖖🏽🔮👼🏽👌🏽🙏🏽🖕🏽🐉☄️📱🖥️⌚️🗻 💎 #👽 #Alien #Annunaki #British #Buddha #Ra #ispwich #muk


0

So at some point last night I decided to face one of my fears and hold this giant monster. 🐍
There was definitely a moment or two I was freaked out of my mind but it was worth getting over one of my many fears.
#snakelady #giantsnakes #ihatesnakes
#doingcrazythings
#facethosefears


5

0.1 GREEN ANACONDA (CHLOE)
I can't believe how big she is getting not that long ago she could barely fit in my hands now she can't even fit in my arms lol she is such a gorgeous gal.
#krazykrisballpythonz #giantsnakes #green #anaconda #greenanaconda #eunectes #murinus #eunectesmurinus #bigsnakes #gorgeousanacondas


0

They say she’s gone too far this time. 🐍 @taylorswift


8

Visited the snakes at the zoo, found out I don’t speak #Parseltongue #harrypottergeek #oaklawnzoo #giantsnakes #hpfangirl #family #vacation #novascotia


0

(Burmese python) stunning Albino I'm totally in love with this clutch got such a good variation of each morph well impressed 😘👌


4

Wonderful! I When passion overrules fear, you can achieve the unthinkable
Regrann from @natgeo - Photo @tbfrost | Words @paulrosolie
There is a reason big fish, and big crocs, and snakes for that matter too, live to see old age: they are shrewd. A few years ago my team and I caught the world record for longest live, verifiably measured wild anaconda. We named her Eleanor after my grandmother. She was resting on floating vegetation in the warm morning sun. The giant anacondas love the floating grasses because if any threat comes, they can dive under immediately. From the tip of a large canoe I saw her, and she saw me, and immediately started going down. Clever girl. When I splashed into the swamp to where she was and wrapped my arms around her it was with the full knowledge that this nearly twenty-foot snake was in full control. She weighed more, was stronger, could swim better, and had dozens of re-curved teeth to use in her defense. The team of 8 researchers with me jumped in too and all of them tried to grab parts of her, but there was nothing to stand on - the water was 20 plus feet deep. We held onto her tail as she thrashed around, and for a moment coils as thick as any of us were emerging and splashing everywhere. It was like fighting the Cracken. When I got control of her head I lost control of everything else, I could no longer swim and could no longer protect from her coils. It was the rest of the team that kept me afloat, and hauled me – and the snake - up onto the boat so that we could measure her and collect data, the first information gathered on green anacondas in the Peruvian Amazon. You can’t tranquilize an anaconda, so for now studying them has to be done the old-school way. Thankfully, not all of them are that hard - or dangerous - to catch, like this small 6 foot female we found on the edge of stream in a swamp. Doesn’t matter how small or large the snake is though, each anaconda I work with I consider the privilege of a lifetime.
To see more photos of this anaconda, which is the largest species of snake in the world , I’m @tbfrost
#snakesofinstagram #peru #amazon #anacondas #giantsnakes #scalesandskin - #regrann


4

Photo @tbfrost | Words @paulrosolie
There is a reason big fish, and big crocs, and snakes for that matter too, live to see old age: they are shrewd. A few years ago my team and I caught the world record for longest live, verifiably measured wild anaconda. We named her Eleanor after my grandmother. She was resting on floating vegetation in the warm morning sun. The giant anacondas love the floating grasses because if any threat comes, they can dive under immediately. From the tip of a large canoe I saw her, and she saw me, and immediately started going down. Clever girl. When I splashed into the swamp to where she was and wrapped my arms around her it was with the full knowledge that this nearly twenty-foot snake was in full control. She weighed more, was stronger, could swim better, and had dozens of re-curved teeth to use in her defense. The team of 8 researchers with me jumped in too and all of them tried to grab parts of her, but there was nothing to stand on - the water was 20 plus feet deep. We held onto her tail as she thrashed around, and for a moment coils as thick as any of us were emerging and splashing everywhere. It was like fighting the Cracken. When I got control of her head I lost control of everything else, I could no longer swim and could no longer protect from her coils. It was the rest of the team that kept me afloat, and hauled me – and the snake - up onto the boat so that we could measure her and collect data, the first information gathered on green anacondas in the Peruvian Amazon. You can’t tranquilize an anaconda, so for now studying them has to be done the old-school way. Thankfully, not all of them are that hard - or dangerous - to catch, like this small 6 foot female we found on the edge of stream in a swamp. Doesn’t matter how small or large the snake is though, each anaconda I work with I consider the privilege of a lifetime.
To see more photos of this anaconda, which is the largest species of snake in the world , I’m @tbfrost
#snakesofinstagram #peru #amazon #anacondas #giantsnakes #scalesandskin


1

Regrann @netgo Photo @tbfrost | Words @paulrosolie
There is a reason big fish, and big crocs, and snakes for that matter too, live to see old age: they are shrewd. A few years ago my team and I caught the world record for longest live, verifiably measured wild anaconda. We named her Eleanor after my grandmother. She was resting on floating vegetation in the warm morning sun. The giant anacondas love the floating grasses because if any threat comes, they can dive under immediately. From the tip of a large canoe I saw her, and she saw me, and immediately started going down. Clever girl. When I splashed into the swamp to where she was and wrapped my arms around her it was with the full knowledge that this nearly twenty-foot snake was in full control. She weighed more, was stronger, could swim better, and had dozens of re-curved teeth to use in her defense. The team of 8 researchers with me jumped in too and all of them tried to grab parts of her, but there was nothing to stand on - the water was 20 plus feet deep. We held onto her tail as she thrashed around, and for a moment coils as thick as any of us were emerging and splashing everywhere. It was like fighting the Cracken. When I got control of her head I lost control of everything else, I could no longer swim and could no longer protect from her coils. It was the rest of the team that kept me afloat, and hauled me – and the snake - up onto the boat so that we could measure her and collect data, the first information gathered on green anacondas in the Peruvian Amazon. You can’t tranquilize an anaconda, so for now studying them has to be done the old-school way. Thankfully, not all of them are that hard - or dangerous - to catch, like this small 6 foot female we found on the edge of stream in a swamp. Doesn’t matter how small or large the snake is though, each anaconda I work with I consider the privilege of a lifetime.
To see more photos of this anaconda, which is the largest species of snake in the world , I’m @tbfrost
#snakesofinstagram #peru #amazon #anacondas #giantsnakes #scalesandskin


0

From @natgeo - Photo @tbfrost | Words @paulrosolie
There is a reason big fish, and big crocs, and snakes for that matter too, live to see old age: they are shrewd. A few years ago my team and I caught the world record for longest live, verifiably measured wild anaconda. We named her Eleanor after my grandmother. She was resting on floating vegetation in the warm morning sun. The giant anacondas love the floating grasses because if any threat comes, they can dive under immediately. From the tip of a large canoe I saw her, and she saw me, and immediately started going down. Clever girl. When I splashed into the swamp to where she was and wrapped my arms around her it was with the full knowledge that this nearly twenty-foot snake was in full control. She weighed more, was stronger, could swim better, and had dozens of re-curved teeth to use in her defense. The team of 8 researchers with me jumped in too and all of them tried to grab parts of her, but there was nothing to stand on - the water was 20 plus feet deep. We held onto her tail as she thrashed around, and for a moment coils as thick as any of us were emerging and splashing everywhere. It was like fighting the Cracken. When I got control of her head I lost control of everything else, I could no longer swim and could no longer protect from her coils. It was the rest of the team that kept me afloat, and hauled me – and the snake - up onto the boat so that we could measure her and collect data, the first information gathered on green anacondas in the Peruvian Amazon. You can’t tranquilize an anaconda, so for now studying them has to be done the old-school way. Thankfully, not all of them are that hard - or dangerous - to catch, like this small 6 foot female we found on the edge of stream in a swamp. Doesn’t matter how small or large the snake is though, each anaconda I work with I consider the privilege of a lifetime.
To see more photos of this anaconda, which is the largest species of snake in the world , I’m @tbfrost
#snakesofinstagram #peru #amazon #anacondas #giantsnakes #scalesandskinVasco


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Photo @tbfrost | Words @paulrosolie
There is a reason big fish, and big crocs, and snakes for that matter too, live to see old age: they are shrewd. A few years ago my team and I caught the world record for longest live, verifiably measured wild anaconda. We named her Eleanor after my grandmother. She was resting on floating vegetation in the warm morning sun. The giant anacondas love the floating grasses because if any threat comes, they can dive under immediately. From the tip of a large canoe I saw her, and she saw me, and immediately started going down. Clever girl. When I splashed into the swamp to where she was and wrapped my arms around her it was with the full knowledge that this nearly twenty-foot snake was in full control. She weighed more, was stronger, could swim better, and had dozens of re-curved teeth to use in her defense. The team of 8 researchers with me jumped in too and all of them tried to grab parts of her, but there was nothing to stand on - the water was 20 plus feet deep. We held onto her tail as she thrashed around, and for a moment coils as thick as any of us were emerging and splashing everywhere. It was like fighting the Cracken. When I got control of her head I lost control of everything else, I could no longer swim and could no longer protect from her coils. It was the rest of the team that kept me afloat, and hauled me – and the snake - up onto the boat so that we could measure her and collect data, the first information gathered on green anacondas in the Peruvian Amazon. You can’t tranquilize an anaconda, so for now studying them has to be done the old-school way. Thankfully, not all of them are that hard - or dangerous - to catch, like this small 6 foot female we found on the edge of stream in a swamp. Doesn’t matter how small or large the snake is though, each anaconda I work with I consider the privilege of a lifetime.
To see more photos of this anaconda, which is the largest species of snake in the world , I’m @tbfrost
#snakesofinstagram #peru #amazon #anacondas #giantsnakes #scalesandskin


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Regrann from @natgeo - Photo @tbfrost | Words @paulrosolie
There is a reason big fish, and big crocs, and snakes for that matter too, live to see old age: they are shrewd. A few years ago my team and I caught the world record for longest live, verifiably measured wild anaconda. We named her Eleanor after my grandmother. She was resting on floating vegetation in the warm morning sun. The giant anacondas love the floating grasses because if any threat comes, they can dive under immediately. From the tip of a large canoe I saw her, and she saw me, and immediately started going down. Clever girl. When I splashed into the swamp to where she was and wrapped my arms around her it was with the full knowledge that this nearly twenty-foot snake was in full control. She weighed more, was stronger, could swim better, and had dozens of re-curved teeth to use in her defense. The team of 8 researchers with me jumped in too and all of them tried to grab parts of her, but there was nothing to stand on - the water was 20 plus feet deep. We held onto her tail as she thrashed around, and for a moment coils as thick as any of us were emerging and splashing everywhere. It was like fighting the Cracken. When I got control of her head I lost control of everything else, I could no longer swim and could no longer protect from her coils. It was the rest of the team that kept me afloat, and hauled me – and the snake - up onto the boat so that we could measure her and collect data, the first information gathered on green anacondas in the Peruvian Amazon. You can’t tranquilize an anaconda, so for now studying them has to be done the old-school way. Thankfully, not all of them are that hard - or dangerous - to catch, like this small 6 foot female we found on the edge of stream in a swamp. Doesn’t matter how small or large the snake is though, each anaconda I work with I consider the privilege of a lifetime.
To see more photos of this anaconda, which is the largest species of snake in the world , I’m @tbfrost
#snakesofinstagram #peru #amazon #anacondas #giantsnakes #scalesandskin - #regrann


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Photo @tbfrost | Words @paulrosolie
There is a reason big fish, and big crocs, and snakes for that matter too, live to see old age: they are shrewd. A few years ago my team and I caught the world record for longest live, verifiably measured wild anaconda. We named her Eleanor after my grandmother. She was resting on floating vegetation in the warm morning sun. The giant anacondas love the floating grasses because if any threat comes, they can dive under immediately. From the tip of a large canoe I saw her, and she saw me, and immediately started going down. Clever girl. When I splashed into the swamp to where she was and wrapped my arms around her it was with the full knowledge that this nearly twenty-foot snake was in full control. She weighed more, was stronger, could swim better, and had dozens of re-curved teeth to use in her defense. The team of 8 researchers with me jumped in too and all of them tried to grab parts of her, but there was nothing to stand on - the water was 20 plus feet deep. We held onto her tail as she thrashed around, and for a moment coils as thick as any of us were emerging and splashing everywhere. It was like fighting the Cracken. When I got control of her head I lost control of everything else, I could no longer swim and could no longer protect from her coils. It was the rest of the team that kept me afloat, and hauled me – and the snake - up onto the boat so that we could measure her and collect data, the first information gathered on green anacondas in the Peruvian Amazon. You can’t tranquilize an anaconda, so for now studying them has to be done the old-school way. Thankfully, not all of them are that hard - or dangerous - to catch, like this small 6 foot female we found on the edge of stream in a swamp. Doesn’t matter how small or large the snake is though, each anaconda I work with I consider the privilege of a lifetime.
To see more photos of this anaconda, which is the largest species of snake in the world , I’m @tbfrost
#snakesofinstagram #peru #amazon #anacondas #giantsnakes #scalesandskin


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Happy World Snake Day from my two biggest boys and I! I will never stop being a voice for these fascinating misunderstood animals that can’t speak or defend themselves. There’s nothing like the feeling of when someone who is extremely afraid of snakes come here and are able to open their mind to petting or holding one. You can see it on their face, a sense of accomplishment, fascination and realization they aren’t these dangerous monsters they are made out to be. I tell everyone! I understand people have a fear of them but if you can just open your mind to realize they are beneficial, deserve respect and a chance to live just like we do! I love that saying... “don’t be afraid of a reptiles tongue, the only animal that can hurt you with its tongue is a human being.” 🐍 #WorldSnakeDay


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#Repost @natgeo with @get_repost
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Photo @tbfrost | Words @paulrosolie
There is a reason big fish, and big crocs, and snakes for that matter too, live to see old age: they are shrewd. A few years ago my team and I caught the world record for longest live, verifiably measured wild anaconda. We named her Eleanor after my grandmother. She was resting on floating vegetation in the warm morning sun. The giant anacondas love the floating grasses because if any threat comes, they can dive under immediately. From the tip of a large canoe I saw her, and she saw me, and immediately started going down. Clever girl. When I splashed into the swamp to where she was and wrapped my arms around her it was with the full knowledge that this nearly twenty-foot snake was in full control. She weighed more, was stronger, could swim better, and had dozens of re-curved teeth to use in her defense. The team of 8 researchers with me jumped in too and all of them tried to grab parts of her, but there was nothing to stand on - the water was 20 plus feet deep. We held onto her tail as she thrashed around, and for a moment coils as thick as any of us were emerging and splashing everywhere. It was like fighting the Cracken. When I got control of her head I lost control of everything else, I could no longer swim and could no longer protect from her coils. It was the rest of the team that kept me afloat, and hauled me – and the snake - up onto the boat so that we could measure her and collect data, the first information gathered on green anacondas in the Peruvian Amazon. You can’t tranquilize an anaconda, so for now studying them has to be done the old-school way. Thankfully, not all of them are that hard - or dangerous - to catch, like this small 6 foot female we found on the edge of stream in a swamp. Doesn’t matter how small or large the snake is though, each anaconda I work with I consider the privilege of a lifetime.
To see more photos of this anaconda, which is the largest species of snake in the world , I’m @tbfrost
#snakesofinstagram #peru #amazon #anacondas #giantsnakes #scalesandskin


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Photo @tbfrost | Words @paulrosolie
There is a reason big fish, and big crocs, and snakes for that matter too, live to see old age: they are shrewd. A few years ago my team and I caught the world record for longest live, verifiably measured wild anaconda. We named her Eleanor after my grandmother. She was resting on floating vegetation in the warm morning sun. The giant anacondas love the floating grasses because if any threat comes, they can dive under immediately. From the tip of a large canoe I saw her, and she saw me, and immediately started going down. Clever girl. When I splashed into the swamp to where she was and wrapped my arms around her it was with the full knowledge that this nearly twenty-foot snake was in full control. She weighed more, was stronger, could swim better, and had dozens of re-curved teeth to use in her defense. The team of 8 researchers with me jumped in too and all of them tried to grab parts of her, but there was nothing to stand on - the water was 20 plus feet deep. We held onto her tail as she thrashed around, and for a moment coils as thick as any of us were emerging and splashing everywhere. It was like fighting the Cracken. When I got control of her head I lost control of everything else, I could no longer swim and could no longer protect from her coils. It was the rest of the team that kept me afloat, and hauled me – and the snake - up onto the boat so that we could measure her and collect data, the first information gathered on green anacondas in the Peruvian Amazon. You can’t tranquilize an anaconda, so for now studying them has to be done the old-school way. Thankfully, not all of them are that hard - or dangerous - to catch, like this small 6 foot female we found on the edge of stream in a swamp. Doesn’t matter how small or large the snake is though, each anaconda I work with I consider the privilege of a lifetime.
To see more photos of this anaconda, which is the largest species of snake in the world , I’m @tbfrost
#snakesofinstagram #peru #amazon #anacondas #giantsnakes #scalesandskin


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🎵 You got that James Dean, daydream look in your eye ✨ /
And I got that red lip, classic thing that you like 💋 #flytaylorfly


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0.1 GREEN ANACONDA (IZABELLA)
Took her out for a soak to get out this heat...
#krazykrisballpythonz #greenanaconda #giantsnakes #bigsnakes #largesnakes #watermonitor #sulcatatortoise #ballpythons #mexicanbeadedlizard


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We’re back with a full episode, binchezzzz!!! It’s Cryptids Pt. 2 the Electric Boogaloo! 1. Dobhar-Chu aka our cat @trashman_al 2. Mapinguari aka stomach-giney 3. Ogopogo aka snake made of wood 4. Grootslang aka Voldemort’s best friend 5. Black Shuck aka cyclops doggy 6. Marshall Feathers #cryptids #conspiracy #farts #humanhands #giantsnakes #MarshallFeathers


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Me @taylorswift with my blonde ombré back 😻🇬🇧 ...when you pay extra for tickets at the front & she performs part of the set at the back 😩 still amazing though 💜 #taylorswift2018 #reputationstadiumtour #taylorwembley #reputationtour #likeforlike #like4likesback #ombrehair #blondepigtails #blondeplaits #giantsnakes @taylorslondon


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Oh ya know, just appreciating all of Gods’ creation ...even the 15’ python 😲#teamSweetness #getoutanddostuff #familytime #giantsnakes #creationmuseum #hos #familyoutings #doingstufftogether #creation


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Part 1. Taylor Swift "Reputation Tour". Opening act, Charlie XCX. 56k in attendance. Insane energy. Thank you for an amazing time @taylorswift @charli_xcx #2018concertseason #taylorswift #taylorswiftreputation #swifties #centurylinkfield #seattleconcerts #charliexcx #giantsnakes #suspendedgondola


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DYK - Forget about anaconda movies if this snake exists now then it would have been a great threat not only to humans but also to large mammals like elephants too
Name -Titanoboa
Height -12.8m(42ft)
Weight -1135 kg(2,500 lb; 1.12 long tons; 1.25 short tons)

#giantsnakes #titanoboa #extinctanimals


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