#lartigue

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#lartigue#paris#photography#jacqueshenrilartigue#fashionhistory#photographyschool#fashioneditorial#fashiongram#fashionphotographer#photographylovers#stolenmoments#womenphotographers#modernwomen#photographyhistory#mysteriousbeauty#glamour#trailblazers#beauty#irvingpenn#babepaley#pollymellen#johnrawlings

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Jacques-Henri Lartigue. Paris, avenue de Acacias. 1912. Gelatin silver print, 11 3/4 x 151/2”
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#lartigue #paris #acacias #history #photohistory #thearchive #photoarchives #streetphoto_bnw #moma #momaphotography #momaphotograph


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Richard Avedon, Alexey Brodovitch, Graphic Designer, Le Thor, France, February 9, 1970. Alexey Brodovitch is remembered today as the art director of Harper's Bazaar for nearly a quarter of a century. But the volatile Russian emigré's influence was much broader and more complex than his long tenure at a fashion magazine might suggest. He played a crucial role in introducing into the United States a radically simplified, “modern” graphic design style forged in Europe in the 1920s from an amalgam of vanguard movements in art and design. Through his teaching, he created a generation of designers sympathetic to his belief in the primacy of visual freshness and immediacy. Fascinated with photography, he made it the backbone of modern magazine design, and he fostered the development of an expressionistic, almost primal style of picture-taking that became the dominant style of photographic practice in the 1950s.
In addition, Brodovitch is virtually the model for the modern magazine art director. He did not simply arrange photographs, illustrations and type on the page; he took an active role in conceiving and commissioning all forms of graphic art, and he specialized in discovering and showcasing young and unknown talent. His first assistant in New York was a very young Irving Penn. Leslie Gill, Richard Avedon and Hiro are among the other photographers whose work Brodovitch nurtured during his long career. So great was his impact on the editorial image of Harper's Bazaar that he achieved celebrity status; the film Funny Face, for example, which starred Fred Astaire as a photographer much like Avedon, named its art-director character “Dovitch.”
#fashioneditorial, #fashiongram, #fashionphotographer, #photographylovers, #fashionhistory, #womenphotographers, #photographyschool, #lartigue, #paris, #stolenmoments, #modernwomen, #trailblazers, #glamour, #mysteriousbeauty, #kikidemontparnasse, #muse, #barbette, #reinvention, #beauty, #brave, #erwinblumenfeld, #irvingpenn, #avedon, #photographyhistory, #babssimpson, #gracecoddington, #babepaley, #pollymellen, #johnrawlings


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Découvrez un large choix de toiles basques aux coloris variés pour habiller vos tables d'hiver ❄️ Le lien dans la bio 🔼
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#acupuncture jambes #pablopicasso par #lartigue . Great picture to frame 🙏🙏🙏#angleatelier


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Designed by Alexey Brodovitch, Richard Avedon's portrait of Truman Capote from Observations, 1959. In 1934, newly installed Bazaar editor Carmel Snow attended an Art Directors Club of New York exhibition curated by 36-year-old graphic designer Alexey Brodovitch. Snow called it a revelation, describing "pages that bled beautifully, cropped photographs, typography and design that were bold and arresting." She immediately offered Brodovitch a job as Bazaar's art director. Throughout his career atthe magazine, Brodovitch, a Russian émigré (by way of Paris), revolutionized magazine design. With his directive "Astonish me," he inspired some of the greatest visual artists of the 20th century (including protégés Irving Penn, Hiro, and, of course, Richard Avedon) to create legendary images.
Brodovitch's signature use of white space, his innovation of Bazaar's iconic Didot logo, and the cinematic quality that his obsessive cropping brought to layouts (not even the work of Man Ray and Henri Cartier-Bresson was safe from his busy scissors) compelled Truman Capote to write, "What Dom Pérignon was to champagne ... so [Brodovitch] has been to ... photographic design and editorial layout." Sadly, Brodovitch's personal life was less triumphant. Plagued by alcoholism, he left Bazaar in 1958 and eventually moved to the south of France, where he died in 1971. However, his genius lives on. Thirty-six years later, the work of Alexey Brodovitch never fails to astonish us.
#fashioneditorial, #fashiongram, #fashionphotographer, #photographylovers, #fashionhistory, #womenphotographers, #photographyschool, #lartigue, #paris, #stolenmoments, #modernwomen, #trailblazers, #glamour, #mysteriousbeauty, #kikidemontparnasse, #muse, #barbette, #reinvention, #beauty, #brave, #erwinblumenfeld, #irvingpenn, #avedon, #photographyhistory, #babssimpson, #gracecoddington, #babepaley, #pollymellen, #johnrawlings


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#Repost @davidonyc with @make_repost
・・・
And now to Alexey Brodovitch, the legendary art director. Brodovitch laying out Observations the first book of Avedon’s portraits, 1959. Although he was regarded as one of the most influential teachers in photography, Mr. Brodovitch maintained that he did not believe in teaching.
“I am a can opener,” he would say. His aim was to provoke students into discovering themselves. Among those whom he tutored were Richard Avedon, Irving Penn, Hiro, Bruce Davidson and Art Kane.
As art director at Harper's Bazaar, the fashion magazine, from 1934 to 1958, and as a kind of guru in what he termed his “design laboratories,” Mr. Brodovitch demanded originality and bestowed praise sparingly.
Deliberately irritating at times, Mr. Brodovitch would often ask a student to explain his work, then comment, “I believe your story, but I don't believe your pictures.” But he would add sometimes, “Take everything I say with a grain of salt.”
Although he encouraged imagination and inventiveness, Mr. Brodovitch's approach was classical. A picture should speak for itself, he would say. If it is good, he would explain, little layout is needed, just beautiful setting.
Eschewing the stiff and the posed, Mr. Brodovitch once stirred a great controversy at Harper's Bazaar by insisting that the magazine publish photographs by Mr. Avedon of models on roller skates in Paris. Because of his dynamic and experimental approach, Mr. Brodovitch was credited with having revolutionized fashion photography.
#fashioneditorial, #fashiongram, #fashionphotographer, #photographylovers, #fashionhistory, #womenphotographers, #photographyschool, #lartigue, #paris, #stolenmoments, #modernwomen, #trailblazers, #glamour, #mysteriousbeauty, #kikidemontparnasse, #muse, #barbette, #reinvention, #beauty, #brave, #erwinblumenfeld, #irvingpenn, #avedon, #photographyhistory, #babssimpson, #gracecoddington, #babepaley, #pollymellen, #johnrawlings


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And now to Alexey Brodovitch, the legendary art director. Brodovitch laying out Observations the first book of Avedon’s portraits, 1959. Although he was regarded as one of the most influential teachers in photography, Mr. Brodovitch maintained that he did not believe in teaching.
“I am a can opener,” he would say. His aim was to provoke students into discovering themselves. Among those whom he tutored were Richard Avedon, Irving Penn, Hiro, Bruce Davidson and Art Kane.
As art director at Harper's Bazaar, the fashion magazine, from 1934 to 1958, and as a kind of guru in what he termed his “design laboratories,” Mr. Brodovitch demanded originality and bestowed praise sparingly.
Deliberately irritating at times, Mr. Brodovitch would often ask a student to explain his work, then comment, “I believe your story, but I don't believe your pictures.” But he would add sometimes, “Take everything I say with a grain of salt.”
Although he encouraged imagination and inventiveness, Mr. Brodovitch's approach was classical. A picture should speak for itself, he would say. If it is good, he would explain, little layout is needed, just beautiful setting.
Eschewing the stiff and the posed, Mr. Brodovitch once stirred a great controversy at Harper's Bazaar by insisting that the magazine publish photographs by Mr. Avedon of models on roller skates in Paris. Because of his dynamic and experimental approach, Mr. Brodovitch was credited with having revolutionized fashion photography.
#fashioneditorial, #fashiongram, #fashionphotographer, #photographylovers, #fashionhistory, #womenphotographers, #photographyschool, #lartigue, #paris, #stolenmoments, #modernwomen, #trailblazers, #glamour, #mysteriousbeauty, #kikidemontparnasse, #muse, #barbette, #reinvention, #beauty, #brave, #erwinblumenfeld, #irvingpenn, #avedon, #photographyhistory, #babssimpson, #gracecoddington, #babepaley, #pollymellen, #johnrawlings


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The other day we hung a bunch of artwork. It made all the spaces feel fresh and exciting, even this previously dark little corner. Still love this Designers Guild wallpaper from a few years ago, it actually gets better with age. Also love creating quirky juxtapositions of masculine photos on feminine wallpaper, the hard lines of the mirror against the soft voluptuousness of the marble bust - unexpected delights.
#interiordesign #chiclittlecorner #blackandwhite #divine #wallpaper #eclectic #collectedtreasure #charm #whimsical #quirkyjuxtapositions #iconicphotos #silverscreen #lartigue #shimmery #evocative #anotherera #bohemian #unexpecteddelights #interiordesignideas #smallspaces #alifewelllived #interior #styledbyme #designedbyme #onlocation #tbt #designer #bjohnstonefashion


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Une toile 100% basque et authentique à l'esthétique masculine ⏺️ Découvrez la toile Txomin Noir et ses compagnons dans le lien de la bio 🔼
#lartigue #lartigue1910 #paysbaque #cotebasque #biarritz #lingedemaison
#lingebasque #bidos #ascain #stjeandeluz #tradition #savoirfaire


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1an apres les travaux ! Dégustation du #foiegras #lartigue
#intermarche #talence


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Henry Clarke, Dorian Leigh wears a dress by Jacques Heim, S/S 1955, on the backdrop: a painting by Courbet at the Petit Palais, Paris. Clarke's career in US fashion had hardly begun, however, before he decided, against the cultural tide, to move to Paris. Photographs in two early-1950s issues of the magazine Ka- leidoscope are virtually all that remain of his American beginnings. In Paris, he worked for the designers Jean Desses and Molyneux, and for Femina magazine, also accepting commissions for Harpers Bazaar and Album de Figaro.
By the mid-1950s, he was working exclusively for Vogue magazine, producing pictures of consummate elegance, but still with that inimitable edge of New York realism. In 1955, French Vogue published his photograph of the model Dorien Leigh wearing a dress by Jacques Helm. Posing Leigh against the background of a Courbet painting of two naked figures locked in a passionate embrace, Clarke made a picture of an angular elegant woman exuding both disdain and and intense sexuality. Though enclosed in a carapace of close-fitting silk, Leigh is energised-high style in a hurry.
Unlike so many of the photographers who emerged in the 1960s and 1970s (during which time he continued to work for French Vogue), Clarke never victimised women and fully accepted that fashion, though beguiling and extraordinary, is merely the stuff we put on our backs.
#fashioneditorial, #fashiongram, #fashionphotographer, #photographylovers, #fashionhistory, #womenphotographers, #photographyschool, #lartigue, #paris, #stolenmoments, #modernwomen, #trailblazers, #glamour, #mysteriousbeauty, #kikidemontparnasse, #muse, #barbette, #reinvention, #beauty, #brave, #erwinblumenfeld, #irvingpenn, #avedon, #photographyhistory, #babssimpson, #gracecoddington, #babepaley, #pollymellen, #johnrawlings


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La toile Txomin Noir ravira assurément vos convives lors des fêtes de fin d'année ✨
Retrouvez-la dans le lien de la bio 🔼
#lartigue #lartigue1910 #paysbaque #cotebasque #biarritz #lingedemaison
#lingebasque #bidos #ascain #stjeandeluz #tradition #savoirfaire


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Henry Clarke, Vogue. Henry Clarke was the son of Irish immigrants settled in California. Like so many of his generation, he found employment in the burgeoning American consumerism of the late 1940s, directing display at the Oakland department store, I. Magnin. But the cultural energy of New York City soon drew Clarke away from the West Coast, and in 1948 he travelled East to take up a temporary job with Conde Nast.
He soon became fascinated by photography, observing closely the differing styles of Penn, Beaton and Horst. He realised that the pace of the new photography depended very much on the use of the smaller more adaptable camera, and familiarised himself with the workings of the twin-lensed Rolleiflex. But perhaps the most important step in his career was his decision to enrol on a course at the New School for Social Research, where Alexey Brodovitch, the now legendary eminence grise of the new photography was set to become a major force in the magazine world. Like so many of Brodovitch's students (who included both Avedon and Penn), Clarke learnt how to combine the fantasy of fashion with the energy of photo-reportage. Both models and gowns became players in a rich social drama.
#fashioneditorial, #fashiongram, #fashionphotographer, #photographylovers, #fashionhistory, #womenphotographers, #photographyschool, #lartigue, #paris, #stolenmoments, #modernwomen, #trailblazers, #glamour, #mysteriousbeauty, #kikidemontparnasse, #muse, #barbette, #reinvention, #beauty, #brave, #erwinblumenfeld, #irvingpenn, #avedon, #photographyhistory, #babssimpson, #gracecoddington, #babepaley, #pollymellen, #johnrawlings


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Jacques Fath (1912-1954). Evening dress, coat and wide-brimmed hat. The collar three layers of pleated organza flares on a black coat and softens the sheath. Black fabric Fournier. Paris (Madame J. Fath), spring-summer 1956. Model: Dovima. Photography by Henry Clarke, published in Vogue France, March 1956. Henry Clarke arrived on the US fashion scene in 1948 as an assistant in the props department of the Conde Nast Studios, and immediately became a witness to the changing face of post-war fashion photography. While American imagery was still dominated by Vogue's two great European style magicians, Horst P. Horst and the the British photographer Cecil Beaton, the replacement of high elegance and whimsy with a photography more rooted in "the real" was already firmly on the agenda. Like many other photographers of his generation, Clarke was compelled to absorb into his work the pressing demands of the "new woman". While Christian Dior was successful in his launch of the billowing fabric-heavy New Look in liberated Paris, for many women, the freedom offered by full-time employment and tailored trousers in the mid-1940s was not to be easily relinquished.
For photography as well as for fashion, the Second World World War had changed everything. Picture magazines had multiplied, and dominating them all was Life magazine, which brought to the United States public grainy and dramatic reportage from the war zone, depicting the horrors as well as the heroism. Even British Vogue, which continued, Blitz or no Blitz, to promote haute couture to the wealthy, commissioned fashion photographs by Lee Miller and Cecil Beaton made against a background of bombed London, and wheedled its readers to support the severe lines of the Utility Suit. The post-war years saw the emergence of two photographers, Richard Avedon and Irving Penn, who were to begin to ease fashion photography out of its elegant closet and bring it even closer to the dynamic of reportage.
#fashioneditorial, #fashiongram, #fashionphotographer, #photographylovers, #fashionhistory, #womenphotographers, #photographyschool, #lartigue, #paris, #stolenmoments, #modernwomen, #trailblazers, #glamour, #mysteriousbeauty, #kiki


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Dovima, hat by Svend for Madeleine de Rauch, Paris studio, French Vogue, 1956 by Henry Clarke. Mr. Clarke was born in Los Angeles and had a peripatetic childhood from, as he once said, "Chicago to Washington, via Florida." His family moved to San Francisco in 1932 and he eventually got a job as a window dresser for the I. Magnin department store. In 1946, he went to New York and soon became a background and accessorizing assistant at the Vogue studio. Watching Cecil Beaton photograph the model Dorian Leigh decided him on becoming a fashion photographer, Ms. Train said.
During the 1960s Clarke was sent by Vogue’s Diana Vreeland, editor of the magazine, to exotic locations such as Syria, Iran, Jordan, India and Mexico where he pushed the limits of exotic color location work, juxtaposing the flamboyant new styles in fashion against famous architectural and archeological sites around the world. Clarke and Vreeland created what is known as “Travel fashion.”
Clarke’s photographs of haute couture, and of the elegant women who wore it, were published in a book titled “L’Elegance des Annees Cinquante.”
Since the 1970s, Clarke became a freelance photographer and participated in various exhibitions. He remained active until his death.
#fashioneditorial, #fashiongram, #fashionphotographer, #photographylovers, #fashionhistory, #womenphotographers, #photographyschool, #lartigue, #paris, #stolenmoments, #modernwomen, #trailblazers, #glamour, #mysteriousbeauty, #kikidemontparnasse, #muse, #barbette, #reinvention, #beauty, #brave, #erwinblumenfeld, #irvingpenn, #avedon, #photographyhistory, #babssimpson, #gracecoddington, #babepaley, #pollymellen, #johnrawlings


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Surpreendente. Fotografia de #Lartigue, única, assinada por ele. Extremamente e estranhamente contemporânea. @huxleyparlour #Parisphoto #backrooms Adoramos as salinhas escondidas. #photography #jacqueshenrilartigue


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Chapeau plume, Balenciaga, 1953 by Henry Clarke. Mr. Clarke, whose photographs of haute couture and of the elegant women who wore it were published in a book titled "L'Elegance des Annees Cinquante," was at the height of his renown in the 1950's and 60's. He worked under contract to the American, French and British Vogues from 1950 to the late 70's and was the photographer on major fashion shoots for the magazines.
During the editorial reign of Diana Vreeland, when jet travel made exotic locations more accessible, he traveled to India, Mexico, Sicily, Iran, Jordan and Syria for features that frequently took up to 20 pages.
"One of his greatest gifts was doing his homework," said Susan Train, the Paris bureau chief of Conde Nast, who often accompanied him on trips when she was Paris editor of American Vogue. "He knew all about the places we were going and he was able to tell the official guides assigned to us, 'No, I want this and this,' and we would race around the country with two models, a hairdresser and a fleet of cars."
Ms. Train said that another of his gifts was "always making the women he photographed look beautiful." His images were the epitome of sophistication, with wisps of veil making eyes mysterious and lens magic creating more swanlike necks than ever existed. His subjects included the Empress of Thailand, the Duchess of Alba, the Duchess of Windsor, Marella Agnelli and Robin Duke.
#fashioneditorial, #fashiongram, #fashionphotographer, #photographylovers, #fashionhistory, #womenphotographers, #photographyschool, #lartigue, #paris, #stolenmoments, #modernwomen, #trailblazers, #glamour, #mysteriousbeauty, #kikidemontparnasse, #muse, #barbette, #reinvention, #beauty, #brave, #erwinblumenfeld, #irvingpenn, #avedon, #photographyhistory, #babssimpson, #gracecoddington, #babepaley, #pollymellen, #johnrawlings


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Un air marin pour votre intérieur ou pour votre extérieur 🌊
La toile Amatio saura vous séduire, découvrez-la dans le lien de la bio !
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