#pathofthepanther

Instagram photos and videos

#KeepFLWild#FloridaWild#PathofthePanther#everglades#expedition#FloridaWildlifeCorridor#corridor#Repost#bobcat#panther#raccoon#pathofthepanther#deer#turkey#bear#nature#florida#conservation#keepflwild#photography#natgeo#beautiful#Everglades#explore#wildernessculture#wildflorida#floridawild#nativepride#bigcat

Hashtags #pathofthepanther for Instagram

#Repost @natgeo ・・・
Photo by @CarltonWard | Path of the Panther >>>> The reason I am focusing on the Florida panther for my current storytelling project with @NatGeo is that protecting the land needed for the wide-ranging panther will protect millions of acres of habitat for thousands of other species that depend on the panther’s domain. Not to mention saving Florida rangelands, timberlands, groves and the headwaters of the Everglades from development. As rancher Cary Lightsey told me, “the panther is going to have to help us save Florida.” A male panther has a home range of 200 square miles — four time larger than the city of Miami but approximately the same amount of wildlife habitat lost to development in Florida each year. This camera trap at Babcock Ranch shows a few of the species relying on the “Path of the Panther.” Swipe for 3 more photos following this adult male panther: white-tailed deer, Osceola turkey and raccoon, all captured on the same trail during a couple weeks in January. Please share this story to help inspire the protection of the #FloridaWildlifeCorridor. @fl_wildcorridor #PathofthePanther #FloridaWild #KeepFLWild #panther #deer #turkey #raccoon #corridor


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Photo by @CarltonWard // One of my camera traps, which I checked last week, produced this photo of a bobcat winding it's way through cypress knees and over a downed tree in Florida Panther National Wildlife Refuge. This is one of my favorite and most challenging camera sites. My goal is to show an endangered Florida panther amidst the quintessential south Florida swamp habitat that has been necessary for its survival during the past century. But since I first placed a camera trap here in 2015, the swamp has been flooded with water for 70 percent of the time. I've captured an amazing alligator photo, some good bear shots, and now this bobcat, but not yet a panther image that rises to the promise of this location. And now the rainy season has started again. Hopefully I'll get a couple more weeks of when this drainage is still a dry trail, and maybe a panther will come through. If not, it will be another 8 months before the water subsides and I can try again. Meanwhile, I am thankful for this bobcat that came through in the twilight hours to show off its beautiful forest home. My #PathofthePanther project with @NatGeo is about using the story of the Florida panther to inspire appreciation and protection of the Florida Wildlife Corridor so we can keep the Everglades connected to the rest of America and provide and path for the northward expansion and recovery of the panther, for the benefit of all of the other species (and people) who rely on its domain. Please follow @CarltonWard for more hidden wildlife. @FL_WildCorridor @USFWS @myfwc #FloridaWild #KeepFLWild


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Better late than never to #worldgiraffeday! I’ve always felt kindred to these gentle, lanky giants, being a 5’11’’ long-limbed woman myself. I was lucky enough to meet this male reticulated giraffe while working for the #pathofthepanther project with @carltonward back in the spring. Giraffe populations have decreased by 40% over the last three decades and are now locally extinct in 7 African countries. They are suffering from what the Giraffe Conservation Foundation has termed a “silent extinction.” Let’s help raise awareness and let this tragedy remain silent no longer 🦒❤️


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Photo by @CarltonWard // A white egret preens its breeding plumage in Everglades National Park, which was that starting point of the 2012 Florida Wildlife Corridor Expedition. Our team paddled, hiked and biked 1,000+ miles in 100 consecutive days, tracing the last remaining wildlife corridor still connecting the Everglades (southern tip of Florida) north to the Okefenokee Swamp (southern Georgia). Everglades wading bird populations have declined by more than 90 percent from their peak. Plume hunters aggressively killed wading birds in the late 1800s — as many as 5 million each year — primarily to provide feathers to decorate hats that were fashionable in America and Europe. Seeing birds hunted nearly to extinction galvanized the early environmental movement, including establishment of the modern National Audubon Society and President Roosevelt creating the first National Wildlife Refuge (Pelican Island) in 1903. Habitat loss for development and draining of wetlands have continued to challenge wading birds, but protecting more land and restoring the flow of the Everglades offers hope for recovery. My current #PathofthePanther project with @NatGeo is working to bring more attention to the Florida Wildlife Corridor through the story of the endangered Florida panther, because without protecting a wildlife corridor to the north, the panther will have no path to recovery. The clock is ticking as 1000 people move to Florida each day. Five million acres of the Corridor are projected to be lost by 2070 if development continues to sprawl on its current trajectory. Please connect with me @carltonward and please share this story so we can help save the #FloridaWildlifeCorridor. @fl_wildcorridor @insidenatgeo. #everglades #expedition #FloridaWild #KeepFLWild @audubonsociety @evergladesnps. Expedition team members: @joeguthrie8 @mallorydimmitt @filmnatureman.


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Photo by @CarltonWard | A bobcat triggers a camera trap in rare scrub habitat on the Lake Wales Ridge -- ancient sand dunes that form the spine of Central Florida, rising 300 feet above sea level as the highest natural feature in the peninsula, and hosting a variety of endangered and endemic plants -- a time capsule to 2 million years ago when the rest of Florida was covered by a shallow sea. While much of the historic vegetation has been replaced by roads, crops and housing, this section of the ridge is protected by Archbold Biological Station (@archboldstation), which is a catalyst for research and conservation in the surrounding landscape. This outpost in the Northern Everglades is where we founded the Florida Wildlife Corridor project to communicate the vision for habitat protection needed to keep Florida wild. In 2012, with support from National Geographic, friends and I hiked, paddled and biked 1,000+ miles in 100 consecutive days, tracing this last remaining wildlife corridor between the Everglades (southern tip of Florida) and the Okefenokee Swamp (southern Georgia). We crossed Archbold on day 35 of the journey. My current #PathofthePanther project with @NatGeo is focused on the same Corridor through the story of the endangered Florida panther, because without protecting a wildlife corridor as a lifeline north from the Everglades, the panther will have no path to recovery. The clock is ticking as 1000 people move to Florida each day, and 5 million acres of the Corridor are projected to be lost by 2070 if development continues on its current trajectory. Please connect with me @carltonward and share this story so we can help #KeepFLWild. #FloridaWildlifeCorridor @fl_wildcorridor @insidenatgeo #everglades #expedition #FloridaWild #bobcat #corridor.


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I swear there’s a road here. It’s going to be a wet summer of field work in the Greater Everglades Ecosystem for the #pathofthepanther team
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#florida #keepflwild #nature #conservation #panther #bigcat


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Photo by @CarltonWard // Andre Jumper, Adam Turtle, Bobby Yates, Kane Jumper and Justin Gopherr keep their Seminole heritage alive moving a group of calves through wooden pens at their Brighton Reservation. Known as the the only unconquered tribe in the United States, the Seminoles persevered in the Everglades through three wars with the US military. I find it no coincidence that the Florida panther, the last puma to survive in the eastern US did so in harsh South Florida swamps alongside the Seminoles. Check out @CarltonWard to see the “Native Pride” tattoo on the hands of Kane Jumper. The Seminole Tribe of Florida is the 7th largest producer of beef cattle in the United States. They are descendants of a Creek chief named Cowkeeper and their low density herds today protect the Everglades from development that consumes more than 100,000 acres of wild Florida every year. #livingheritage #nativepride #seminoletribe #keepflwild #floridawild @flcattlemen @ilcp_photographers #pathofthepanther


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Photo by @CarltonWard | Path of the Panther >>>> The reason I am focusing on the Florida panther for my current storytelling project with @NatGeo is that protecting the land needed for the wide-ranging panther will protect millions of acres of habitat for thousands of other species that depend on the panther’s domain. Not to mention saving Florida rangelands, timberlands, groves and the headwaters of the Everglades from development. As rancher Cary Lightsey told me, “the panther is going to have to help us save Florida.” A male panther has a home range of 200 square miles — four time larger than the city of Miami but approximately the same amount of wildlife habitat lost to development in Florida each year. This camera trap at Babcock Ranch shows a few of the species relying on the “Path of the Panther.” Swipe for 3 more photos following this adult male panther: white-tailed deer, Osceola turkey and raccoon, all captured on the same trail during a couple weeks in January. Please share this story to help inspire the protection of the #FloridaWildlifeCorridor. @fl_wildcorridor #PathofthePanther #FloridaWild #KeepFLWild #panther #deer #turkey #raccoon #corridor


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The reason I am focusing on the Florida panther for my current storytelling project with @Nationalgeographicsindia is that protecting the land needed for the wide-ranging panther will protect millions of acres of habitat for thousands of other species that depend on the panther’s domain. Not to mention saving Florida rangelands, timberlands, groves and the headwaters of the Everglades from development. As rancher Cary Lightsey told me, “the panther is going to have to help us save Florida.” A male panther has a home range of 200 square miles — four time larger than the city of Miami but approximately the same amount of wildlife habitat lost to development in Florida each year. This camera trap at Babcock Ranch shows a few of the species relying on the “Path of the Panther.” Swipe for 3 more photos following this adult male panther: white-tailed deer, Osceola turkey and raccoon, all captured on the same trail during a couple weeks in January. Please share this story to help inspire the protection of the #FloridaWildlifeCorridor. #PathofthePanther #FloridaWild #KeepFLWild #panther #deer #turkey #raccoon #corridor
#natgeo #naturephotography
#wildgeography #NationalGeographic
#nationalgeographicsindia


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Connecting with cartographers, engineers, explorers, photographers and scientists on everything from meditation to submarine construction at #natgeofest has stretched my vision of what’s possible. Ready to go #further into the stories of Wild Florida. .
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#florida #wildflorida #visitflorida #keepflwilf #palms #trees #nature #conservation #pathofthepanther #wildernessculture #explore #optoutside #natgeo #photography


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#Repost @natgeo with @get_repost
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Photo by @CarltonWard | Path of the Panther >>>> The reason I am focusing on the Florida panther for my current storytelling project with @NatGeo is that protecting the land needed for the wide-ranging panther will protect millions of acres of habitat for thousands of other species that depend on the panther’s domain. Not to mention saving Florida rangelands, timberlands, groves and the headwaters of the Everglades from development. As rancher Cary Lightsey told me, “the panther is going to have to help us save Florida.” A male panther has a home range of 200 square miles — four time larger than the city of Miami but approximately the same amount of wildlife habitat lost to development in Florida each year. This camera trap at Babcock Ranch shows a few of the species relying on the “Path of the Panther.” Swipe for 3 more photos following this adult male panther: white-tailed deer, Osceola turkey and raccoon, all captured on the same trail during a couple weeks in January. Please share this story to help inspire the protection of the #FloridaWildlifeCorridor. @fl_wildcorridor #PathofthePanther #FloridaWild #KeepFLWild #panther #deer #turkey #raccoon #corridor


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Photo by @CarltonWard | Path of the Panther >>>> The reason I am focusing on the Florida panther for my current storytelling project with @NatGeo is that protecting the land needed for the wide-ranging panther will protect millions of acres of habitat for thousands of other species that depend on the panther’s domain. Not to mention saving Florida rangelands, timberlands, groves and the headwaters of the Everglades from development. As rancher Cary Lightsey told me, “the panther is going to have to help us save Florida.” A male panther has a home range of 200 square miles — four time larger than the city of Miami but approximately the same amount of wildlife habitat lost to development in Florida each year. This camera trap at Babcock Ranch shows a few of the species relying on the “Path of the Panther.” Swipe for 3 more photos following this adult male panther: white-tailed deer, Osceola turkey and raccoon, all captured on the same trail during a couple weeks in January. Please share this story to help inspire the protection of the #FloridaWildlifeCorridor. @fl_wildcorridor #PathofthePanther #FloridaWild #KeepFLWild #panther #deer #turkey #raccoon #corridor


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#Repost @carltonward (@get_repost)
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One of my camera traps is set deep in the Fakahatchee Strand on a flooded trail where I hope to capture a panther walking in water. That prospect has become more challenging as water levels have begun to drop. In the last 2 weeks I got 4000 photos of wading birds and they smoked my flash batteries by the end of the first week. I’m frustrated by the birds, this pesky persistent great blue heron in particular. But it did make some nice selfies. #swamplife #heron #pathofthepanther #FloridaWild #KeepFLWild @fl_wildcorridor #cognisys #scout


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#Repost @carltonward (@get_repost)
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During the next few days I’ll be sharing some photos from the Florida Wildlife Corridor Expeditions. For the first Expedition, our team started in Everglades National Park at the southern tip of the Florida peninsula, and paddled, hiked and biked 1,000+ miles over 100 consecutive days, tracing the last remaining wildlife corridor still connecting the Everglades north to the Okefenokee Swamp in southern Georgia. See my recent post @NatGeo for a map showing our route, alongside the route of the 2015 expedition that followed the western reaches of the Corridor from the Everglades Headwaters near Orlando around the Gulf Coast to Alabama. This photo shows a crocodile sunning itself on mangrove roots in the brackish waters where the estuary meets Florida Bay. Everglades National Park holds the largest protected mangrove coastline in the Western Hemisphere. We didn’t see people outside our team for several days of the Expedition as we explored the vast watery wilderness of this World Heritage Area that arguably has the most to lose if we fail to protect a corridor to keep the Everglades connected to its headwaters in Central Florida and the rest of the country beyond. My current #PathofthePanther project with @NatGeo is working to bring more attention to this same issue through the story of the endangered Florida panther, because without protecting a wildlife corridor to the north, the panther will have no path to recovery. The clock is ticking as 1000 people move to Florida each day. Five million acres of the Corridor are projected to be lost by 2070 if development continues along its current sprawling trajectory. @insidenatgeo. #everglades #expedition #FloridaWild #KeepFLWild @evergladesnps. With @mallorydimmitt @joeguthrie8 and @filmnatureman.


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Head in the clouds // Feet in the mud. Nothing like a week in DC to provide humbling perspective #pathofthepanther
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#conservation #florida #floridawild #photography #nature #wildernessculture


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Photo by @CarltonWard | A bobcat triggers a camera trap in rare scrub habitat on the Lake Wales Ridge -- ancient sand dunes that form the spine of Central Florida, rising 300 feet above sea level as the highest natural feature in the peninsula, and hosting a variety of endangered and endemic plants -- a time capsule to 2 million years ago when the rest of Florida was covered by a shallow sea. While much of the historic vegetation has been replaced by roads, crops and housing, this section of the ridge is protected by Archbold Biological Station (@archboldstation), which is a catalyst for research and conservation in the surrounding landscape. This outpost in the Northern Everglades is where we founded the Florida Wildlife Corridor project to communicate the vision for habitat protection needed to keep Florida wild. In 2012, with support from National Geographic, friends and I hiked, paddled and biked 1,000+ miles in 100 consecutive days, tracing this last remaining wildlife corridor between the Everglades (southern tip of Florida) and the Okefenokee Swamp (southern Georgia). We crossed Archbold on day 35 of the journey. My current #PathofthePanther project with @NatGeo is focused on the same Corridor through the story of the endangered Florida panther, because without protecting a wildlife corridor as a lifeline north from the Everglades, the panther will have no path to recovery. The clock is ticking as 1000 people move to Florida each day, and 5 million acres of the Corridor are projected to be lost by 2070 if development continues on its current trajectory. Please connect with me @carltonward and share this story so we can help #KeepFLWild. #FloridaWildlifeCorridor @fl_wildcorridor @insidenatgeo #everglades #expedition #FloridaWild #bobcat #corridor.
#onlinemarketingcoach #onlinebusinesscoach #workfromhomeperks #networkmarketingpro


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Photo by @CarltonWard | A bobcat triggers a camera trap in rare scrub habitat on the Lake Wales Ridge -- ancient sand dunes that form the spine of Central Florida, rising 300 feet above sea level as the highest natural feature in the peninsula, and hosting a variety of endangered and endemic plants -- a time capsule to 2 million years ago when the rest of Florida was covered by a shallow sea. While much of the historic vegetation has been replaced by roads, crops and housing, this section of the ridge is protected by Archbold Biological Station (@archboldstation), which is a catalyst for research and conservation in the surrounding landscape. This outpost in the Northern Everglades is where we founded the Florida Wildlife Corridor project to communicate the vision for habitat protection needed to keep Florida wild. In 2012, with support from National Geographic, friends and I hiked, paddled and biked 1,000+ miles in 100 consecutive days, tracing this last remaining wildlife corridor between the Everglades (southern tip of Florida) and the Okefenokee Swamp (southern Georgia). We crossed Archbold on day 35 of the journey. My current #PathofthePanther project with @NatGeo is focused on the same Corridor through the story of the endangered Florida panther, because without protecting a wildlife corridor as a lifeline north from the Everglades, the panther will have no path to recovery. The clock is ticking as 1000 people move to Florida each day, and 5 million acres of the Corridor are projected to be lost by 2070 if development continues on its current trajectory. Please connect with me @carltonward and share this story so we can help #KeepFLWild. #FloridaWildlifeCorridor @fl_wildcorridor @insidenatgeo #everglades #expedition #FloridaWild #bobcat #corridor.


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#Repost @carltonward So happy to be helping with #PathofthePanther as it strives to protect Florida’s wildlife habitats.
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Path of the Panther. The reason I am focusing on the Florida panther for my current storytelling project with @NatGeo is that protecting the land needed for the wide-ranging panther will protect millions of acres of habitat for thousands of other species that depend on the panther’s domain. Not to mention saving Florida rangelands, timberlands, groves and the headwaters of the Everglades from development. As rancher Cary Lightsey told me, “the panther is going to have to help us save Florida.” A male panther has a home range of 200 square miles — four time larger than the city of Miami but approximately the same amount of wildlife habitat lost to development in Florida each year. This camera trap at Babcock Ranch shows a few of the species relying on the “Path of the Panther.” Swipe for 3 more photos following this adult male panther: white-tailed deer, Osceola turkey and raccoon, all captured on the same trail during a couple weeks in January. Please share this story to help inspire the protection of the #FloridaWildlifeCorridor. @fl_wildcorridor #PathofthePanther #FloridaWild #KeepFLWild #panther #deer #turkey #raccoon #corridor


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#Repost・・・@carltonward Path of the Panther. The reason I am focusing on the Florida panther for my current storytelling project with @NatGeo is that protecting the land needed for the wide-ranging panther will protect millions of acres of habitat for thousands of other species that depend on the panther’s domain. Not to mention saving Florida rangelands, timberlands, groves and the headwaters of the Everglades from development. As rancher Cary Lightsey told me, “the panther is going to have to help us save Florida.” A male panther has a home range of 200 square miles — four time larger than the city of Miami but approximately the same amount of wildlife habitat lost to development in Florida each year. This camera trap at Babcock Ranch shows a few of the species relying on the “Path of the Panther.” Swipe for 3 more photos following this adult male panther: white-tailed deer, Osceola turkey and raccoon, all captured on the same trail during a couple weeks in January. Please share this story to help inspire the protection of the #FloridaWildlifeCorridor. @fl_wildcorridor #PathofthePanther #FloridaWild #KeepFLWild #panther #deer #turkey #raccoon #corridor


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#Repost @carltonward. Protecting the #pathofthepanther is so much more than a story about one big cat. It’s about saving Florida 🐾
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Path of the Panther. The reason I am focusing on the Florida panther for my current storytelling project with @NatGeo is that protecting the land needed for the wide-ranging panther will protect millions of acres of habitat for thousands of other species that depend on the panther’s domain. Not to mention saving Florida rangelands, timberlands, groves and the headwaters of the Everglades from development. As rancher Cary Lightsey told me, “the panther is going to have to help us save Florida.” A male panther has a home range of 200 square miles — four time larger than the city of Miami but approximately the same amount of wildlife habitat lost to development in Florida each year. This camera trap at Babcock Ranch shows a few of the species relying on the “Path of the Panther.” Swipe for 3 more photos following this adult male panther: white-tailed deer, Osceola turkey and raccoon, all captured on the same trail during a couple weeks in January. Please share this story to help inspire the protection of the #FloridaWildlifeCorridor. @fl_wildcorridor #PathofthePanther #FloridaWild #KeepFLWild #panther #deer #turkey #raccoon #corridor


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🐾#KeepFLWild #Repost @carltonward
・・・Path of the Panther. The reason I am focusing on the Florida panther for my current storytelling project with @NatGeo is that protecting the land needed for the wide-ranging panther will protect millions of acres of habitat for thousands of other species that depend on the panther’s domain. Not to mention saving Florida rangelands, timberlands, groves and the headwaters of the Everglades from development. As rancher Cary Lightsey told me, “the panther is going to have to help us save Florida.” A male panther has a home range of 200 square miles — four time larger than the city of Miami but approximately the same amount of wildlife habitat lost to development in Florida each year. This camera trap at Babcock Ranch shows a few of the species relying on the “Path of the Panther.” Swipe for 3 more photos following this adult male panther: white-tailed deer, Osceola turkey and raccoon, all captured on the same trail during a couple weeks in January. Please share this story to help inspire the protection of the #FloridaWildlifeCorridor. @fl_wildcorridor #PathofthePanther #FloridaWild #KeepFLWild #panther #deer #turkey #raccoon #corridor


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Path of the Panther. The reason I am focusing on the Florida panther for my current storytelling project with @NatGeo is that protecting the land needed for the wide-ranging panther will protect millions of acres of habitat for thousands of other species that depend on the panther’s domain. Not to mention saving Florida rangelands, timberlands, groves and the headwaters of the Everglades from development. As rancher Cary Lightsey told me, “the panther is going to have to help us save Florida.” A male panther has a home range of 200 square miles — four time larger than the city of Miami but approximately the same amount of wildlife habitat lost to development in Florida each year. This camera trap at Babcock Ranch shows a few of the species relying on the “Path of the Panther.” Swipe for 3 more photos following this adult male panther: white-tailed deer, Osceola turkey and raccoon, all captured on the same trail during a couple weeks in January. Please share this story to help inspire the protection of the #FloridaWildlifeCorridor. @fl_wildcorridor #PathofthePanther #FloridaWild #KeepFLWild #panther #deer #turkey #raccoon #corridor


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Photo by @CarltonWard | A bobcat triggers a camera trap in rare scrub habitat on the Lake Wales Ridge -- ancient sand dunes that form the spine of Central Florida, rising 300 feet above sea level as the highest natural feature in the peninsula, and hosting a variety of endangered and endemic plants -- a time capsule to 2 million years ago when the rest of Florida was covered by a shallow sea. While much of the historic vegetation has been replaced by roads, crops and housing, this section of the ridge is protected by Archbold Biological Station (@archboldstation), which is a catalyst for research and conservation in the surrounding landscape. This outpost in the Northern Everglades is where we founded the Florida Wildlife Corridor project to communicate the vision for habitat protection needed to keep Florida wild. In 2012, with support from National Geographic, friends and I hiked, paddled and biked 1,000+ miles in 100 consecutive days, tracing this last remaining wildlife corridor between the Everglades (southern tip of Florida) and the Okefenokee Swamp (southern Georgia). We crossed Archbold on day 35 of the journey. My current #PathofthePanther project with @NatGeo is focused on the same Corridor through the story of the endangered Florida panther, because without protecting a wildlife corridor as a lifeline north from the Everglades, the panther will have no path to recovery. The clock is ticking as 1000 people move to Florida each day, and 5 million acres of the Corridor are projected to be lost by 2070 if development continues on its current trajectory. Please connect with me @carltonward and share this story so we can help #KeepFLWild. #FloridaWildlifeCorridor @fl_wildcorridor @insidenatgeo #everglades #expedition #FloridaWild #bobcat #corridor.


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Glória de Deus em toda a criação.
Photo by @CarltonWard // Today is #EvergladesDay - an opportunity to celebrate America’s largest subtropical wilderness and the largest protected stretch of mangrove coastline in the Western Hemisphere. There are four million acres of contiguous public conservation lands in the Everglades of South Florida. My current #PathofthePanther project with @NatGeo is focusing on the story of the panther to inspire protection of the @fl_wildcorridor so we can ensure that the Everglades doesn’t get cut off by development from the rest of America. Everglades National Park has been declared an International Biosphere Reserve, a World Heritage Site and a Wetland of International Importance, one of only three locations in the world to appear on all three lists. Shot from a Cesna 177 airplane. Please follow @CarltonWard for more #Everglades #FloridaWild #KeepFLWild
#Rensta #Repost: @natgeo via @renstapp
#photoshootsday #amazing #urban #fly #photo #instaday #vida #life #paz #sun #shooting #green #beautiful #beauty #love #happy #naturale #natural #natureza #nikon


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Photo by @CarltonWard | A bobcat triggers a camera trap in rare scrub habitat on the Lake Wales Ridge -- ancient sand dunes that form the spine of Central Florida, rising 300 feet above sea level as the highest natural feature in the peninsula, and hosting a variety of endangered and endemic plants -- a time capsule to 2 million years ago when the rest of Florida was covered by a shallow sea. While much of the historic vegetation has been replaced by roads, crops and housing, this section of the ridge is protected by Archbold Biological Station (@archboldstation), which is a catalyst for research and conservation in the surrounding landscape. This outpost in the Northern Everglades is where we founded the Florida Wildlife Corridor project to communicate the vision for habitat protection needed to keep Florida wild. In 2012, with support from National Geographic, friends and I hiked, paddled and biked 1,000+ miles in 100 consecutive days, tracing this last remaining wildlife corridor between the Everglades (southern tip of Florida) and the Okefenokee Swamp (southern Georgia). We crossed Archbold on day 35 of the journey. My current #PathofthePanther project with @NatGeo is focused on the same Corridor through the story of the endangered Florida panther, because without protecting a wildlife corridor as a lifeline north from the Everglades, the panther will have no path to recovery. The clock is ticking as 1000 people move to Florida each day, and 5 million acres of the Corridor are projected to be lost by 2070 if development continues on its current trajectory. Please connect with me @carltonward and share this story so we can help #KeepFLWild. #FloridaWildlifeCorridor @fl_wildcorridor @insidenatgeo #everglades #expedition #FloridaWild #bobcat #corridor.


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Photo by @CarltonWard | A bobcat triggers a camera trap in rare scrub habitat on the Lake Wales Ridge -- ancient sand dunes that form the spine of Central Florida, rising 300 feet above sea level as the highest natural feature in the peninsula, and hosting a variety of endangered and endemic plants -- a time capsule to 2 million years ago when the rest of Florida was covered by a shallow sea. While much of the historic vegetation has been replaced by roads, crops and housing, this section of the ridge is protected by Archbold Biological Station (@archboldstation), which is a catalyst for research and conservation in the surrounding landscape. This outpost in the Northern Everglades is where we founded the Florida Wildlife Corridor project to communicate the vision for habitat protection needed to keep Florida wild. In 2012, with support from National Geographic, friends and I hiked, paddled and biked 1,000+ miles in 100 consecutive days, tracing this last remaining wildlife corridor between the Everglades (southern tip of Florida) and the Okefenokee Swamp (southern Georgia). We crossed Archbold on day 35 of the journey. My current #PathofthePanther project with @NatGeo is focused on the same Corridor through the story of the endangered Florida panther, because without protecting a wildlife corridor as a lifeline north from the Everglades, the panther will have no path to recovery. The clock is ticking as 1000 people move to Florida each day, and 5 million acres of the Corridor are projected to be lost by 2070 if development continues on its current trajectory. Please connect with me @carltonward and share this story so we can help #KeepFLWild. #FloridaWildlifeCorridor @fl_wildcorridor @insidenatgeo #everglades #expedition #FloridaWild #bobcat #corridor.


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✨Protecting Florida Wildlife✨Follow @fl_wildcorridor.
Read ⬇️ #Repost @natgeo
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Photo by @CarltonWard | A bobcat triggers a camera trap in rare scrub habitat on the Lake Wales Ridge -- ancient sand dunes that form the spine of Central Florida, rising 300 feet above sea level as the highest natural feature in the peninsula, and hosting a variety of endangered and endemic plants -- a time capsule to 2 million years ago when the rest of Florida was covered by a shallow sea. While much of the historic vegetation has been replaced by roads, crops and housing, this section of the ridge is protected by Archbold Biological Station (@archboldstation), which is a catalyst for research and conservation in the surrounding landscape. This outpost in the Northern Everglades is where we founded the Florida Wildlife Corridor project to communicate the vision for habitat protection needed to keep Florida wild. In 2012, with support from National Geographic, friends and I hiked, paddled and biked 1,000+ miles in 100 consecutive days, tracing this last remaining wildlife corridor between the Everglades (southern tip of Florida) and the Okefenokee Swamp (southern Georgia). We crossed Archbold on day 35 of the journey. My current #PathofthePanther project with @NatGeo is focused on the same Corridor through the story of the endangered Florida panther, because without protecting a wildlife corridor as a lifeline north from the Everglades, the panther will have no path to recovery. The clock is ticking as 1000 people move to Florida each day, and 5 million acres of the Corridor are projected to be lost by 2070 if development continues on its current trajectory. Please connect with me @carltonward and share this story so we can help #KeepFLWild. #FloridaWildlifeCorridor @fl_wildcorridor @insidenatgeo #everglades #expedition #FloridaWild #bobcat #corridor.


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#Repost @natgeo (@get_repost)
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Photo by @CarltonWard | A bobcat triggers a camera trap in rare scrub habitat on the Lake Wales Ridge -- ancient sand dunes that form the spine of Central Florida, rising 300 feet above sea level as the highest natural feature in the peninsula, and hosting a variety of endangered and endemic plants -- a time capsule to 2 million years ago when the rest of Florida was covered by a shallow sea. While much of the historic vegetation has been replaced by roads, crops and housing, this section of the ridge is protected by Archbold Biological Station (@archboldstation), which is a catalyst for research and conservation in the surrounding landscape. This outpost in the Northern Everglades is where we founded the Florida Wildlife Corridor project to communicate the vision for habitat protection needed to keep Florida wild. In 2012, with support from National Geographic, friends and I hiked, paddled and biked 1,000+ miles in 100 consecutive days, tracing this last remaining wildlife corridor between the Everglades (southern tip of Florida) and the Okefenokee Swamp (southern Georgia). We crossed Archbold on day 35 of the journey. My current #PathofthePanther project with @NatGeo is focused on the same Corridor through the story of the endangered Florida panther, because without protecting a wildlife corridor as a lifeline north from the Everglades, the panther will have no path to recovery. The clock is ticking as 1000 people move to Florida each day, and 5 million acres of the Corridor are projected to be lost by 2070 if development continues on its current trajectory. Please connect with me @carltonward and share this story so we can help #KeepFLWild. #FloridaWildlifeCorridor @fl_wildcorridor @insidenatgeo #everglades #expedition #FloridaWild #bobcat #corridor.


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Credit to @natgeo : Photo by @CarltonWard | A bobcat triggers a camera trap in rare scrub habitat on the Lake Wales Ridge -- ancient sand dunes that form the spine of Central Florida, rising 300 feet above sea level as the highest natural feature in the peninsula, and hosting a variety of endangered and endemic plants -- a time capsule to 2 million years ago when the rest of Florida was covered by a shallow sea. While much of the historic vegetation has been replaced by roads, crops and housing, this section of the ridge is protected by Archbold Biological Station (@archboldstation), which is a catalyst for research and conservation in the surrounding landscape. This outpost in the Northern Everglades is where we founded the Florida Wildlife Corridor project to communicate the vision for habitat protection needed to keep Florida wild. In 2012, with support from National Geographic, friends and I hiked, paddled and biked 1,000+ miles in 100 consecutive days, tracing this last remaining wildlife corridor between the Everglades (southern tip of Florida) and the Okefenokee Swamp (southern Georgia). We crossed Archbold on day 35 of the journey. My current #PathofthePanther project with @NatGeo is focused on the same Corridor through the story of the endangered Florida panther, because without protecting a wildlife corridor as a lifeline north from the Everglades, the panther will have no path to recovery. The clock is ticking as 1000 people move to Florida each day, and 5 million acres of the Corridor are projected to be lost by 2070 if development continues on its current trajectory. Please connect with me @carltonward and share this story so we can help #KeepFLWild. #FloridaWildlifeCorridor @fl_wildcorridor @insidenatgeo #everglades #expedition #FloridaWild #bobcat #corridor.


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#Repost from @carltonward // “Native Pride” marks the hands of Kane Jumper, a Native American from the Seminole Tribe of Florida. Known as the the only unconquered tribe in the United States, the Seminoles are descendants of Creeks who persevered in the Everglades through three wars with the US military. I find it no coincidence that the Florida panther, the last puma to survive in the eastern US did so in harsh South Florida swamps alongside the Seminoles. Kane Jumper is a member of the panther clan, a lineage inherited from his mother. #nativepride #seminole #Everglades #FloridaWild #KeepFLWild @fl_wildcorridor @flcattlemen #pathofthepanther"


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Testing one of the first #pathofthepanther camera traps over two years ago on a trip home from South Africa. I just remember being totally overwhelmed running the odds of Carlton actually getting the shot. Roughly 200 panthers X a range of 70 - 200 square miles each. You’re lucky if one passes the camera in a month / maybe twice a year in the right lighting. After accounting for electrical issues, hurricanes, mischievous bears, wildfires and unseasonal rains, I figured the odds of succeeding to be 1/300 in a note on my iPhone. Fortunately, @carltonward is the most dedicated and determined person I know. This spot never produced a winning shot but others did with the help of biologists. Photo credit: Panther Cam 2 .
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#florida #keepflwild #wildflorida #floridawildlife #floridapanthers #nature #wildlife #photography #explore #everglades #natgeo #conservation #bigcat


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Photo by @CarltonWard | A bobcat triggers a camera trap in rare scrub habitat on the Lake Wales Ridge -- ancient sand dunes that form the spine of Central Florida, rising 300 feet above sea level as the highest natural feature in the peninsula, and hosting a variety of endangered and endemic plants -- a time capsule to 2 million years ago when the rest of Florida was covered by a shallow sea. While much of the historic vegetation has been replaced by roads, crops and housing, this section of the ridge is protected by Archbold Biological Station (@archboldstation), which is a catalyst for research and conservation in the surrounding landscape. This outpost in the Northern Everglades is where we founded the Florida Wildlife Corridor project to communicate the vision for habitat protection needed to keep Florida wild. In 2012, with support from National Geographic, friends and I hiked, paddled and biked 1,000+ miles in 100 consecutive days, tracing this last remaining wildlife corridor between the Everglades (southern tip of Florida) and the Okefenokee Swamp (southern Georgia). We crossed Archbold on day 35 of the journey. My current #PathofthePanther project with @NatGeo is focused on the same Corridor through the story of the endangered Florida panther, because without protecting a wildlife corridor as a lifeline north from the Everglades, the panther will have no path to recovery. The clock is ticking as 1000 people move to Florida each day, and 5 million acres of the Corridor are projected to be lost by 2070 if development continues on its current trajectory. Please connect with me @carltonward and share this story so we can help #KeepFLWild. #FloridaWildlifeCorridor @fl_wildcorridor @insidenatgeo #everglades #expedition #FloridaWild #bobcat #corridor.

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From @natgeo:
Photo by @CarltonWard | A bobcat triggers a camera trap in rare scrub habitat on the Lake Wales Ridge -- ancient sand dunes that form the spine of Central Florida, rising 300 feet above sea level as the highest natural feature in the peninsula, and hosting a variety of endangered and endemic plants -- a time capsule to 2 million years ago when the rest of Florida was covered by a shallow sea. While much of the historic vegetation has been replaced by roads, crops and housing, this section of the ridge is protected by Archbold Biological Station (@archboldstation), which is a catalyst for research and conservation in the surrounding landscape. This outpost in the Northern Everglades is where we founded the Florida Wildlife Corridor project to communicate the vision for habitat protection needed to keep Florida wild. In 2012, with support from National Geographic, friends and I hiked, paddled and biked 1,000+ miles in 100 consecutive days, tracing this last remaining wildlife corridor between the Everglades (southern tip of Florida) and the Okefenokee Swamp (southern Georgia). We crossed Archbold on day 35 of the journey. My current #PathofthePanther project with @NatGeo is focused on the same Corridor through the story of the endangered Florida panther, because without protecting a wildlife corridor as a lifeline north from the Everglades, the panther will have no path to recovery. The clock is ticking as 1000 people move to Florida each day, and 5 million acres of the Corridor are projected to be lost by 2070 if development continues on its current trajectory. Please connect with me @carltonward and share this story so we can help #KeepFLWild. #FloridaWildlifeCorridor @fl_wildcorridor @insidenatgeo #everglades #expedition #FloridaWild #bobcat #corridor.


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Shooted by @CarltonWard | A bobcat triggers a camera trap in rare scrub habitat on the Lake Wales Ridge -- ancient sand dunes that form the spine of Central Florida, rising 300 feet above sea level as the highest natural feature in the peninsula, and hosting a variety of endangered and endemic plants -- a time capsule to 2 million years ago when the rest of Florida was covered by a shallow sea. While much of the historic vegetation has been replaced by roads, crops and housing, this section of the ridge is protected by Archbold Biological Station (@archboldstation), which is a catalyst for research and conservation in the surrounding landscape. This outpost in the Northern Everglades is where we founded the Florida Wildlife Corridor project to communicate the vision for habitat protection needed to keep Florida wild. In 2012, with support from National Geographic, friends and I hiked, paddled and biked 1,000+ miles in 100 consecutive days, tracing this last remaining wildlife corridor between the Everglades (southern tip of Florida) and the Okefenokee Swamp (southern Georgia). We crossed Archbold on day 35 of the journey. My current project with @NatGeo is focused on the same Corridor through the story of the endangered Florida panther, because without protecting a wildlife corridor as a lifeline north from the Everglades, the panther will have no path to recovery. The clock is ticking as 1000 people move to Florida each day, and 5 million acres of the Corridor are projected to be lost by 2070 if development continues on its current trajectory. Please connect with me @carltonward and share this story so we can help . @fl_wildcorridor @insidenatgeo .
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Photo by @CarltonWard | A bobcat triggers a camera trap in rare scrub habitat on the Lake Wales Ridge -- ancient sand dunes that form the spine of Central Florida, rising 300 feet above sea level as the highest natural feature in the peninsula, and hosting a variety of endangered and endemic plants -- a time capsule to 2 million years ago when the rest of Florida was covered by a shallow sea. While much of the historic vegetation has been replaced by roads, crops and housing, this section of the ridge is protected by Archbold Biological Station (@archboldstation), which is a catalyst for research and conservation in the surrounding landscape. This outpost in the Northern Everglades is where we founded the Florida Wildlife Corridor project to communicate the vision for habitat protection needed to keep Florida wild. In 2012, with support from National Geographic, friends and I hiked, paddled and biked 1,000+ miles in 100 consecutive days, tracing this last remaining wildlife corridor between the Everglades (southern tip of Florida) and the Okefenokee Swamp (southern Georgia). We crossed Archbold on day 35 of the journey. My current #PathofthePanther project with @NatGeo is focused on the same Corridor through the story of the endangered Florida panther, because without protecting a wildlife corridor as a lifeline north from the Everglades, the panther will have no path to recovery. The clock is ticking as 1000 people move to Florida each day, and 5 million acres of the Corridor are projected to be lost by 2070 if development continues on its current trajectory. Please connect with me @carltonward and share this story so we can help #KeepFLWild. #FloridaWildlifeCorridor @fl_wildcorridor @insidenatgeo #everglades #expedition #FloridaWild #bobcat #corridor.


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Regrann from @natgeo - Photo by @CarltonWard | A bobcat triggers a camera trap in rare scrub habitat on the Lake Wales Ridge -- ancient sand dunes that form the spine of Central Florida, rising 300 feet above sea level as the highest natural feature in the peninsula, and hosting a variety of endangered and endemic plants -- a time capsule to 2 million years ago when the rest of Florida was covered by a shallow sea. While much of the historic vegetation has been replaced by roads, crops and housing, this section of the ridge is protected by Archbold Biological Station (@archboldstation), which is a catalyst for research and conservation in the surrounding landscape. This outpost in the Northern Everglades is where we founded the Florida Wildlife Corridor project to communicate the vision for habitat protection needed to keep Florida wild. In 2012, with support from National Geographic, friends and I hiked, paddled and biked 1,000+ miles in 100 consecutive days, tracing this last remaining wildlife corridor between the Everglades (southern tip of Florida) and the Okefenokee Swamp (southern Georgia). We crossed Archbold on day 35 of the journey. My current #PathofthePanther project with @NatGeo is focused on the same Corridor through the story of the endangered Florida panther, because without protecting a wildlife corridor as a lifeline north from the Everglades, the panther will have no path to recovery. The clock is ticking as 1000 people move to Florida each day, and 5 million acres of the Corridor are projected to be lost by 2070 if development continues on its current trajectory. Please connect with me @carltonward and share this story so we can help #KeepFLWild. #FloridaWildlifeCorridor @fl_wildcorridor @insidenatgeo #everglades #expedition #FloridaWild #bobcat #corridor. - #regrann


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Photo by @CarltonWard | A bobcat triggers a camera trap in rare scrub habitat on the Lake Wales Ridge -- ancient sand dunes that form the spine of Central Florida, rising 300 feet above sea level as the highest natural feature in the peninsula, and hosting a variety of endangered and endemic plants -- a time capsule to 2 million years ago when the rest of Florida was covered by a shallow sea. While much of the historic vegetation has been replaced by roads, crops and housing, this section of the ridge is protected by Archbold Biological Station (@archboldstation), which is a catalyst for research and conservation in the surrounding landscape. This outpost in the Northern Everglades is where we founded the Florida Wildlife Corridor project to communicate the vision for habitat protection needed to keep Florida wild. In 2012, with support from National Geographic, friends and I hiked, paddled and biked 1,000+ miles in 100 consecutive days, tracing this last remaining wildlife corridor between the Everglades (southern tip of Florida) and the Okefenokee Swamp (southern Georgia). We crossed Archbold on day 35 of the journey. My current #PathofthePanther project with @NatGeo is focused on the same Corridor through the story of the endangered Florida panther, because without protecting a wildlife corridor as a lifeline north from the Everglades, the panther will have no path to recovery. The clock is ticking as 1000 people move to Florida each day, and 5 million acres of the Corridor are projected to be lost by 2070 if development continues on its current trajectory. Please connect with me @carltonward and share this story so we can help #KeepFLWild. #FloridaWildlifeCorridor @fl_wildcorridor @insidenatgeo #everglades #expedition #FloridaWild #bobcat #corridor.


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#Repost・・・@carltonward
Did you know that Florida has black bears? There are seven subpopulations distributed throughout the state from Naples to Pensacola that are increasingly isolated by roads and suburban sprawl (swipe right for a map). The core populations are centered on large, forested, public lands. This camera trap photo is from a cattle ranch in between. The importance of ranches to wide-ranging bears inspired the Florida Wildlife Corridor project, which advocates for the habitat protection needed to keep wild Florida connected. In 2012, I hiked, paddled and biked 1,000+ miles in 100 consecutive days, tracing this last remaining wildlife corridor between the Everglades (southern tip of Florida) north to the Okefenokee Swamp (southern Georgia). My current #PathofthePanther project with @NatGeo is focused on the same Corridor through the story of the endangered Florida panther, because without protecting a wildlife corridor north from the Everglades, the panther will have no path to recovery. The clock is ticking as 1000 people move to Florida each day, and 5 million acres of the Corridor are projected to be lost by 2070 if development continues on its current trajectory. Please share this story so we can help save the #FloridaWildlifeCorridor. @fl_wildcorridor @insidenatgeo. #everglades #expedition #FloridaWild #KeepFLWild #bear #corridor @myfwc. Bear research by @joeguthrie8 at @archboldstation, expedition team with @mallorydimmitt.


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Photo by @CarltonWard | Did you know that Florida has black bears? There are seven subpopulations distributed throughout the state from Naples to Pensacola that are increasingly isolated by roads and suburban sprawl (swipe right for a map). The core populations are centered on large, forested, public lands. This camera trap photo is from a cattle ranch in between. The importance of ranches to wide-ranging bears inspired the Florida Corridor project, which advocates for the habitat protection needed to keep wild Florida connected. In 2012, I hiked, paddled and biked 1,000+ miles in 100 consecutive days, tracing this last remaining corridor between the Everglades (southern tip of Florida) north to the Okefenokee Swamp (southern Georgia). My current #PathofthePanther project with is focused on the same Corridor through the story of the endangered Florida panther, because without protecting a wildlife corridor north from the Everglades, the panther will have no path to recovery. The clock is ticking as 1000 people move to Florida each day, and 5 million acres of the Corridor are projected to be lost by 2070 if development continues on its current trajectory. Please connect with me @carltonward and share this story so we can help save the . @fl_wildcorridor @insidenatgeo. #everglades #expedition #FloridaWild #KeepFLWild #bear #corridor @myfwc. Bear research by @joeguthrie8 at @archboldstation, expedition team with @mallorydimmitt.


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@natgeo Photo by @CarltonWard | Did you know that Florida has black bears? There are seven subpopulations distributed throughout the state from Naples to Pensacola that are increasingly isolated by roads and suburban sprawl (swipe right for a map). The core populations are centered on large, forested, public lands. This camera trap photo is from a cattle ranch in between. The importance of ranches to wide-ranging bears inspired the Florida Wildlife Corridor project, which advocates for the habitat protection needed to keep wild Florida connected. In 2012, I hiked, paddled and biked 1,000+ miles in 100 consecutive days, tracing this last remaining wildlife corridor between the Everglades (southern tip of Florida) north to the Okefenokee Swamp (southern Georgia). My current #PathofthePanther project with @NatGeo is focused on the same Corridor through the story of the endangered Florida panther, because without protecting a wildlife corridor north from the Everglades, the panther will have no path to recovery. The clock is ticking as 1000 people move to Florida each day, and 5 million acres of the Corridor are projected to be lost by 2070 if development continues on its current trajectory. Please connect with me @carltonward and share this story so we can help save the #FloridaWildlifeCorridor. @fl_wildcorridor @insidenatgeo. #everglades #expedition #FloridaWild #KeepFLWild #bear #corridor @myfwc. Bear research by @joeguthrie8 at @archboldstation, expedition team with @mallorydimmitt


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#Repost @carltonward with @get_repost
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Did you know that Florida has black bears? There are seven subpopulations distributed throughout the state from Naples to Pensacola that are increasingly isolated by roads and suburban sprawl (swipe right for a map). The core populations are centered on large, forested, public lands. This camera trap photo is from a cattle ranch in between. The importance of ranches to wide-ranging bears inspired the Florida Wildlife Corridor project, which advocates for the habitat protection needed to keep wild Florida connected. In 2012, I hiked, paddled and biked 1,000+ miles in 100 consecutive days, tracing this last remaining wildlife corridor between the Everglades (southern tip of Florida) north to the Okefenokee Swamp (southern Georgia). My current #PathofthePanther project with @NatGeo is focused on the same Corridor through the story of the endangered Florida panther, because without protecting a wildlife corridor north from the Everglades, the panther will have no path to recovery. The clock is ticking as 1000 people move to Florida each day, and 5 million acres of the Corridor are projected to be lost by 2070 if development continues on its current trajectory. Please share this story so we can help save the #FloridaWildlifeCorridor. @fl_wildcorridor @insidenatgeo. #everglades #expedition #FloridaWild #KeepFLWild #bear #corridor @myfwc. Bear research by @joeguthrie8 at @archboldstation, expedition team with @mallorydimmitt.


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♥️♥️♥️♥️♥️♥️♥️♥️ #Repost @natgeo with @get_repost
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Photo by @CarltonWard | Did you know that Florida has black bears? There are seven subpopulations distributed throughout the state from Naples to Pensacola that are increasingly isolated by roads and suburban sprawl (swipe right for a map). The core populations are centered on large, forested, public lands. This camera trap photo is from a cattle ranch in between. The importance of ranches to wide-ranging bears inspired the Florida Wildlife Corridor project, which advocates for the habitat protection needed to keep wild Florida connected. In 2012, I hiked, paddled and biked 1,000+ miles in 100 consecutive days, tracing this last remaining wildlife corridor between the Everglades (southern tip of Florida) north to the Okefenokee Swamp (southern Georgia). My current #PathofthePanther project with @NatGeo is focused on the same Corridor through the story of the endangered Florida panther, because without protecting a wildlife corridor north from the Everglades, the panther will have no path to recovery. The clock is ticking as 1000 people move to Florida each day, and 5 million acres of the Corridor are projected to be lost by 2070 if development continues on its current trajectory. Please connect with me @carltonward and share this story so we can help save the #FloridaWildlifeCorridor. @fl_wildcorridor @insidenatgeo. #everglades #expedition #FloridaWild #KeepFLWild #bear #corridor @myfwc. Bear research by @joeguthrie8 at @archboldstation, expedition team with @mallorydimmitt.


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The way humans treat nature is appalling. #henrythoreau #respectnature take care of this awesome beautiful creation of earth and nature. #Repost @natgeo with @get_repost
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Photo by @CarltonWard | Did you know that Florida has black bears? There are seven subpopulations distributed throughout the state from Naples to Pensacola that are increasingly isolated by roads and suburban sprawl (swipe right for a map). The core populations are centered on large, forested, public lands. This camera trap photo is from a cattle ranch in between. The importance of ranches to wide-ranging bears inspired the Florida Wildlife Corridor project, which advocates for the habitat protection needed to keep wild Florida connected. In 2012, I hiked, paddled and biked 1,000+ miles in 100 consecutive days, tracing this last remaining wildlife corridor between the Everglades (southern tip of Florida) north to the Okefenokee Swamp (southern Georgia). My current #PathofthePanther project with @NatGeo is focused on the same Corridor through the story of the endangered Florida panther, because without protecting a wildlife corridor north from the Everglades, the panther will have no path to recovery. The clock is ticking as 1000 people move to Florida each day, and 5 million acres of the Corridor are projected to be lost by 2070 if development continues on its current trajectory. Please connect with me @carltonward and share this story so we can help save the #FloridaWildlifeCorridor. @fl_wildcorridor @insidenatgeo. #everglades #expedition #FloridaWild #KeepFLWild #bear #corridor @myfwc. Bear research by @joeguthrie8 at @archboldstation, expedition team with @mallorydimmitt.


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Photo by @CarltonWard | Did you know that Florida has black bears? There are seven subpopulations distributed throughout the state from Naples to Pensacola that are increasingly isolated by roads and suburban sprawl (swipe right for a map). The core populations are centered on large, forested, public lands. This camera trap photo is from a cattle ranch in between. The importance of ranches to wide-ranging bears inspired the Florida Wildlife Corridor project, which advocates for the habitat protection needed to keep wild Florida connected. In 2012, I hiked, paddled and biked 1,000+ miles in 100 consecutive days, tracing this last remaining wildlife corridor between the Everglades (southern tip of Florida) north to the Okefenokee Swamp (southern Georgia). My current #PathofthePanther project with @NatGeo is focused on the same Corridor through the story of the endangered Florida panther, because without protecting a wildlife corridor north from the Everglades, the panther will have no path to recovery. The clock is ticking as 1000 people move to Florida each day, and 5 million acres of the Corridor are projected to be lost by 2070 if development continues on its current trajectory. Please connect with me @carltonward and share this story so we can help save the #FloridaWildlifeCorridor. @fl_wildcorridor @insidenatgeo. #everglades #expedition #FloridaWild #KeepFLWild #bear #corridor @myfwc. Bear research by @joeguthrie8 at @archboldstation, expedition team with @mallorydimmitt.
#onlinebusiness #businesswoman


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Did you know that Florida has black bears? There are seven subpopulations distributed throughout the state from Naples to Pensacola that are increasingly isolated by roads and suburban sprawl (swipe right for a map). The core populations are centered on large, forested, public lands. This camera trap photo is from a cattle ranch in between. The importance of ranches to wide-ranging bears inspired the Florida Wildlife Corridor project, which advocates for the habitat protection needed to keep wild Florida connected. In 2012, I hiked, paddled and biked 1,000+ miles in 100 consecutive days, tracing this last remaining wildlife corridor between the Everglades (southern tip of Florida) north to the Okefenokee Swamp (southern Georgia). My current #PathofthePanther project with @NatGeo is focused on the same Corridor through the story of the endangered Florida panther, because without protecting a wildlife corridor north from the Everglades, the panther will have no path to recovery. The clock is ticking as 1000 people move to Florida each day, and 5 million acres of the Corridor are projected to be lost by 2070 if development continues on its current trajectory. Please share this story so we can help save the #FloridaWildlifeCorridor. @fl_wildcorridor @insidenatgeo. #everglades #expedition #FloridaWild #KeepFLWild #bear #corridor @myfwc. Bear research by @joeguthrie8 at @archboldstation, expedition team with @mallorydimmitt.


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Photo by @CarltonWard | Did you know that Florida has black bears? There are seven subpopulations distributed throughout the state from Naples to Pensacola that are increasingly isolated by roads and suburban sprawl (swipe right for a map). The core populations are centered on large, forested, public lands. This camera trap photo is from a cattle ranch in between. The importance of ranches to wide-ranging bears inspired the Florida Wildlife Corridor project, which advocates for the habitat protection needed to keep wild Florida connected. In 2012, I hiked, paddled and biked 1,000+ miles in 100 consecutive days, tracing this last remaining wildlife corridor between the Everglades (southern tip of Florida) north to the Okefenokee Swamp (southern Georgia). My current #PathofthePanther project with @NatGeo is focused on the same Corridor through the story of the endangered Florida panther, because without protecting a wildlife corridor north from the Everglades, the panther will have no path to recovery. The clock is ticking as 1000 people move to Florida each day, and 5 million acres of the Corridor are projected to be lost by 2070 if development continues on its current trajectory. Please connect with me @carltonward and share this story so we can help save the #FloridaWildlifeCorridor. @fl_wildcorridor @insidenatgeo. #everglades #expedition #FloridaWild #KeepFLWild #bear #corridor @myfwc. Bear research by @joeguthrie8 at @archboldstation, expedition team with @mallorydimmitt.


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Amazing❤️#Repost @natgeo ・・・
Photo by @CarltonWard // A white egret preens its breeding plumage in Everglades National Park, which was that starting point of the 2012 Florida Wildlife Corridor Expedition. Our team paddled, hiked and biked 1,000+ miles in 100 consecutive days, tracing the last remaining wildlife corridor still connecting the Everglades (southern tip of Florida) north to the Okefenokee Swamp (southern Georgia). Everglades wading bird populations have declined by more than 90 percent from their peak. Plume hunters aggressively killed wading birds in the late 1800s — as many as 5 million each year — primarily to provide feathers to decorate hats that were fashionable in America and Europe. Seeing birds hunted nearly to extinction galvanized the early environmental movement, including establishment of the modern National Audubon Society and President Roosevelt creating the first National Wildlife Refuge (Pelican Island) in 1903. Habitat loss for development and draining of wetlands have continued to challenge wading birds, but protecting more land and restoring the flow of the Everglades offers hope for recovery. My current #PathofthePanther project with @NatGeo is working to bring more attention to the Florida Wildlife Corridor through the story of the endangered Florida panther, because without protecting a wildlife corridor to the north, the panther will have no path to recovery. The clock is ticking as 1000 people move to Florida each day. Five million acres of the Corridor are projected to be lost by 2070 if development continues to sprawl on its current trajectory. Please connect with me @carltonward and please share this story so we can help save the #FloridaWildlifeCorridor. @fl_wildcorridor @insidenatgeo. #everglades #expedition #FloridaWild #KeepFLWild#naturephotography #nature #amazingphoto @audubonsociety @evergladesnps. Expedition team members: @joeguthrie8 @mallorydimmitt @filmnatureman.


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#Repost @natgeo (@get_repost)
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Photo by @CarltonWard // A white egret preens its breeding plumage in Everglades National Park, which was that starting point of the 2012 Florida Wildlife Corridor Expedition. Our team paddled, hiked and biked 1,000+ miles in 100 consecutive days, tracing the last remaining wildlife corridor still connecting the Everglades (southern tip of Florida) north to the Okefenokee Swamp (southern Georgia). Everglades wading bird populations have declined by more than 90 percent from their peak. Plume hunters aggressively killed wading birds in the late 1800s — as many as 5 million each year — primarily to provide feathers to decorate hats that were fashionable in America and Europe. Seeing birds hunted nearly to extinction galvanized the early environmental movement, including establishment of the modern National Audubon Society and President Roosevelt creating the first National Wildlife Refuge (Pelican Island) in 1903. Habitat loss for development and draining of wetlands have continued to challenge wading birds, but protecting more land and restoring the flow of the Everglades offers hope for recovery. My current #PathofthePanther project with @NatGeo is working to bring more attention to the Florida Wildlife Corridor through the story of the endangered Florida panther, because without protecting a wildlife corridor to the north, the panther will have no path to recovery. The clock is ticking as 1000 people move to Florida each day. Five million acres of the Corridor are projected to be lost by 2070 if development continues to sprawl on its current trajectory. Please connect with me @carltonward and please share this story so we can help save the #FloridaWildlifeCorridor. @fl_wildcorridor @insidenatgeo. #everglades #expedition #FloridaWild #KeepFLWild @audubonsociety @evergladesnps. Expedition team members: @joeguthrie8 @mallorydimmitt @filmnatureman.


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A white egret preens its breeding plumage in Everglades National Park, which was that starting point of the 2012 Florida Wildlife Corridor Expedition. Our team paddled, hiked and biked 1,000+ miles in 100 consecutive days, tracing the last remaining wildlife corridor still connecting the Everglades (southern tip of Florida) north to the Okefenokee Swamp (southern Georgia). Everglades wading bird populations have declined by more than 90 percent from their peak. Plume hunters aggressively killed wading birds in the late 1800s — as many as 5 million each year — primarily to provide feathers to decorate hats that were fashionable in America and Europe. Seeing birds hunted nearly to extinction galvanized the early environmental movement, including establishment of the modern National Audubon Society and President Roosevelt creating the first National Wildlife Refuge (Pelican Island) in 1903. Habitat loss for development and draining of wetlands have continued to challenge wading birds, but protecting more land and restoring the flow of the Everglades offers hope for recovery. My current #PathofthePanther project with @NatGeo is working to bring more attention to the Florida Wildlife Corridor through the story of the endangered Florida panther, because without protecting a wildlife corridor to the north, the panther will have no path to recovery. The clock is ticking as 1000 people move to Florida each day. Five million acres of the Corridor are projected to be lost by 2070 if development continues to sprawl on its current trajectory. Please connect with me @carltonward and please share this story so we can help save the #FloridaWildlifeCorridor. @fl_wildcorridor @saveourplanets @insidenatgeo. #everglades #expedition #FloridaWild #KeepFLWild @audubonsociety @evergladesnps. Expedition team members: @joeguthrie8 @divakarswami @mallorydimmitt @filmnatureman.


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Photo by @CarltonWard // A white egret preens its breeding plumage in Everglades National Park, which was that starting point of the 2012 Florida Wildlife Corridor Expedition. Our team paddled, hiked and biked 1,000+ miles in 100 consecutive days, tracing the last remaining wildlife corridor still connecting the Everglades (southern tip of Florida) north to the Okefenokee Swamp (southern Georgia). Everglades wading bird populations have declined by more than 90 percent from their peak. Plume hunters aggressively killed wading birds in the late 1800s — as many as 5 million each year — primarily to provide feathers to decorate hats that were fashionable in America and Europe. Seeing birds hunted nearly to extinction galvanized the early environmental movement, including establishment of the modern National Audubon Society and President Roosevelt creating the first National Wildlife Refuge (Pelican Island) in 1903. Habitat loss for development and draining of wetlands have continued to challenge wading birds, but protecting more land and restoring the flow of the Everglades offers hope for recovery. My current #PathofthePanther project with @NatGeo is working to bring more attention to the Florida Wildlife Corridor through the story of the endangered Florida panther, because without protecting a wildlife corridor to the north, the panther will have no path to recovery. The clock is ticking as 1000 people move to Florida each day. Five million acres of the Corridor are projected to be lost by 2070 if development continues to sprawl on its current trajectory. Please connect with me @carltonward and please share this story so we can help save the #FloridaWildlifeCorridor. @fl_wildcorridor @insidenatgeo. #everglades #expedition #FloridaWild #KeepFLWild @audubonsociety @evergladesnps. Expedition team members: @joeguthrie8 @mallorydimmitt @filmnatureman.


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Such beauty❤️ #Repost @natgeo
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Photo by @CarltonWard // A white egret preens its breeding plumage in Everglades National Park, which was that starting point of the 2012 Florida Wildlife Corridor Expedition. Our team paddled, hiked and biked 1,000+ miles in 100 consecutive days, tracing the last remaining wildlife corridor still connecting the Everglades (southern tip of Florida) north to the Okefenokee Swamp (southern Georgia). Everglades wading bird populations have declined by more than 90 percent from their peak. Plume hunters aggressively killed wading birds in the late 1800s — as many as 5 million each year — primarily to provide feathers to decorate hats that were fashionable in America and Europe. Seeing birds hunted nearly to extinction galvanized the early environmental movement, including establishment of the modern National Audubon Society and President Roosevelt creating the first National Wildlife Refuge (Pelican Island) in 1903. Habitat loss for development and draining of wetlands have continued to challenge wading birds, but protecting more land and restoring the flow of the Everglades offers hope for recovery. My current #PathofthePanther project with @NatGeo is working to bring more attention to the Florida Wildlife Corridor through the story of the endangered Florida panther, because without protecting a wildlife corridor to the north, the panther will have no path to recovery. The clock is ticking as 1000 people move to Florida each day. Five million acres of the Corridor are projected to be lost by 2070 if development continues to sprawl on its current trajectory. Please connect with me @carltonward and please share this story so we can help save the #FloridaWildlifeCorridor. @fl_wildcorridor @insidenatgeo. #everglades #expedition #FloridaWild #KeepFLWild @audubonsociety @evergladesnps. Expedition team members: @joeguthrie8 @mallorydimmitt @filmnatureman.


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Nature is amazing and beautiful #whiteegret Regrann from @natgeo - Photo by @CarltonWard // A white egret preens its breeding plumage in Everglades National Park, which was that starting point of the 2012 Florida Wildlife Corridor Expedition. Our team paddled, hiked and biked 1,000+ miles in 100 consecutive days, tracing the last remaining wildlife corridor still connecting the Everglades (southern tip of Florida) north to the Okefenokee Swamp (southern Georgia). Everglades wading bird populations have declined by more than 90 percent from their peak. Plume hunters aggressively killed wading birds in the late 1800s — as many as 5 million each year — primarily to provide feathers to decorate hats that were fashionable in America and Europe. Seeing birds hunted nearly to extinction galvanized the early environmental movement, including establishment of the modern National Audubon Society and President Roosevelt creating the first National Wildlife Refuge (Pelican Island) in 1903. Habitat loss for development and draining of wetlands have continued to challenge wading birds, but protecting more land and restoring the flow of the Everglades offers hope for recovery. My current #PathofthePanther project with @NatGeo is working to bring more attention to the Florida Wildlife Corridor through the story of the endangered Florida panther, because without protecting a wildlife corridor to the north, the panther will have no path to recovery. The clock is ticking as 1000 people move to Florida each day. Five million acres of the Corridor are projected to be lost by 2070 if development continues to sprawl on its current trajectory. Please connect with me @carltonward and please share this story so we can help save the #FloridaWildlifeCorridor. @fl_wildcorridor @insidenatgeo. #everglades #expedition #FloridaWild #KeepFLWild @audubonsociety @evergladesnps. Expedition team members: @joeguthrie8 @mallorydimmitt @filmnatureman.


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#Repost @natgeo with @get_repost
・・・
Photo by @CarltonWard // A white egret preens its breeding plumage in Everglades National Park, which was that starting point of the 2012 Florida Wildlife Corridor Expedition. Our team paddled, hiked and biked 1,000+ miles in 100 consecutive days, tracing the last remaining wildlife corridor still connecting the Everglades (southern tip of Florida) north to the Okefenokee Swamp (southern Georgia). Everglades wading bird populations have declined by more than 90 percent from their peak. Plume hunters aggressively killed wading birds in the late 1800s — as many as 5 million each year — primarily to provide feathers to decorate hats that were fashionable in America and Europe. Seeing birds hunted nearly to extinction galvanized the early environmental movement, including establishment of the modern National Audubon Society and President Roosevelt creating the first National Wildlife Refuge (Pelican Island) in 1903. Habitat loss for development and draining of wetlands have continued to challenge wading birds, but protecting more land and restoring the flow of the Everglades offers hope for recovery. My current #PathofthePanther project with @NatGeo is working to bring more attention to the Florida Wildlife Corridor through the story of the endangered Florida panther, because without protecting a wildlife corridor to the north, the panther will have no path to recovery. The clock is ticking as 1000 people move to Florida each day. Five million acres of the Corridor are projected to be lost by 2070 if development continues to sprawl on its current trajectory. Please connect with me @carltonward and please share this story so we can help save the #FloridaWildlifeCorridor. @fl_wildcorridor @insidenatgeo. #everglades #expedition #FloridaWild #KeepFLWild @audubonsociety @evergladesnps. Expedition team members: @joeguthrie8 @mallorydimmitt @filmnatureman.


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Photo by @CarltonWard // A white egret preens its breeding plumage in Everglades National Park, which was that starting point of the 2012 Florida Wildlife Corridor Expedition. Our team paddled, hiked and biked 1,000+ miles in 100 consecutive days, tracing the last remaining wildlife corridor still connecting the Everglades (southern tip of Florida) north to the Okefenokee Swamp (southern Georgia). Everglades wading bird populations have declined by more than 90 percent from their peak. Plume hunters aggressively killed wading birds in the late 1800s — as many as 5 million each year — primarily to provide feathers to decorate hats that were fashionable in America and Europe. Seeing birds hunted nearly to extinction galvanized the early environmental movement, including establishment of the modern National Audubon Society and President Roosevelt creating the first National Wildlife Refuge (Pelican Island) in 1903. Habitat loss for development and draining of wetlands have continued to challenge wading birds, but protecting more land and restoring the flow of the Everglades offers hope for recovery. My current #PathofthePanther project with @NatGeo is working to bring more attention to the Florida Wildlife Corridor through the story of the endangered Florida panther, because without protecting a wildlife corridor to the north, the panther will have no path to recovery. The clock is ticking as 1000 people move to Florida each day. Five million acres of the Corridor are projected to be lost by 2070 if development continues to sprawl on its current trajectory. Please connect with me @carltonward and please share this story so we can help save the #FloridaWildlifeCorridor. @fl_wildcorridor @insidenatgeo. #everglades #expedition #FloridaWild #KeepFLWild @audubonsociety @evergladesnps. Expedition team members: @joeguthrie8 @mallorydimmitt @filmnatureman.
Inspired by @natgeo


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Photo by @CarltonWard // A white egret preens its breeding plumage in Everglades National Park, which was that starting point of the 2012 Florida Wildlife Corridor Expedition. Our team paddled, hiked and biked 1,000+ miles in 100 consecutive days, tracing the last remaining wildlife corridor still connecting the Everglades (southern tip of Florida) north to the Okefenokee Swamp (southern Georgia). Everglades wading bird populations have declined by more than 90 percent from their peak. Plume hunters aggressively killed wading birds in the late 1800s — as many as 5 million each year — primarily to provide feathers to decorate hats that were fashionable in America and Europe. Seeing birds hunted nearly to extinction galvanized the early environmental movement, including establishment of the modern National Audubon Society and President Roosevelt creating the first National Wildlife Refuge (Pelican Island) in 1903. Habitat loss for development and draining of wetlands have continued to challenge wading birds, but protecting more land and restoring the flow of the Everglades offers hope for recovery. My current #PathofthePanther project with @NatGeo is working to bring more attention to the Florida Wildlife Corridor through the story of the endangered Florida panther, because without protecting a wildlife corridor to the north, the panther will have no path to recovery. The clock is ticking as 1000 people move to Florida each day. Five million acres of the Corridor are projected to be lost by 2070 if development continues to sprawl on its current trajectory. Please connect with me @carltonward and please share this story so we can help save the #FloridaWildlifeCorridor. @fl_wildcorridor @insidenatgeo. #everglades #expedition #FloridaWild #KeepFLWild @audubonsociety @evergladesnps. Expedition team members: @joeguthrie8 @mallorydimmitt @filmnatureman.


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Photo by @CarltonWard // A white egret preens its breeding plumage in Everglades National Park, which was that starting point of the 2012 Florida Wildlife Corridor Expedition. Our team paddled, hiked and biked 1,000+ miles in 100 consecutive days, tracing the last remaining wildlife corridor still connecting the Everglades (southern tip of Florida) north to the Okefenokee Swamp (southern Georgia). Everglades wading bird populations have declined by more than 90 percent from their peak. Plume hunters aggressively killed wading birds in the late 1800s — as many as 5 million each year — primarily to provide feathers to decorate hats that were fashionable in America and Europe. Seeing birds hunted nearly to extinction galvanized the early environmental movement, including establishment of the modern National Audubon Society and President Roosevelt creating the first National Wildlife Refuge (Pelican Island) in 1903. Habitat loss for development and draining of wetlands have continued to challenge wading birds, but protecting more land and restoring the flow of the Everglades offers hope for recovery. My current #PathofthePanther project with @NatGeo is working to bring more attention to the Florida Wildlife Corridor through the story of the endangered Florida panther, because without protecting a wildlife corridor to the north, the panther will have no path to recovery. The clock is ticking as 1000 people move to Florida each day. Five million acres of the Corridor are projected to be lost by 2070 if development continues to sprawl on its current trajectory. Please connect with me @carltonward and please share this story so we can help save the #FloridaWildlifeCorridor. @fl_wildcorridor @insidenatgeo. #everglades #expedition #FloridaWild #KeepFLWild @audubonsociety @evergladesnps. Expedition team members: @joeguthrie8 @mallorydimmitt @filmnatureman.


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#Repost @natgeotravel with @get_repost
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Photo by @CarltonWard // My first grant from the National Geographic Society was for the first Florida Wildlife Corridor Expedition (2012). Starting in Everglades National Park at the southern tip of the Florida peninsula, our team paddled, hiked and biked 1,000+ miles in 100 consecutive days, tracing the last remaining wildlife corridor still connecting the Everglades north to the Okefenokee Swamp in southern Georgia. See my recent post @NatGeo for a map showing our route, alongside the route of a 2015 expedition (also supported by NGS), that followed the western reaches of the Corridor from the Everglades Headwaters near Orlando around the Gulf Coast to Alabama. My next several posts will share photos from these expeditions. This photo shows the bow of my kayak pointed at the largest protected mangrove coastline in the Western Hemisphere in Everglades National Park on the first day of the Expedition. See @carltonward for a crocodile draped over mangrove roots from earlier that day. We didn’t see people outside our team for several days as we explored the vast watery wilderness of this World Heritage Area that arguably has the most to lose if we fail to protect a corridor to keep the Everglades connected to its headwaters in Central Florida and the rest of the country beyond. My current #PathofthePanther project with @NatGeo is working to bring more attention to this same issue through the story of the endangered Florida panther, because without protecting a wildlife corridor to the north, the panther will have no path to recovery. The clock is ticking as 1000 people move to Florida each day. Five million acres of the Corridor are projected to be lost by 2070 if development continues along its current sprawling pattern.@insidenatgeo. #everglades #expedition #FloridaWild #KeepFLWild


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#Repost @natgeotravel with @get_repost
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Photo by @CarltonWard // My first grant from the National Geographic Society was for the first Florida Wildlife Corridor Expedition (2012). Starting in Everglades National Park at the southern tip of the Florida peninsula, our team paddled, hiked and biked 1,000+ miles in 100 consecutive days, tracing the last remaining wildlife corridor still connecting the Everglades north to the Okefenokee Swamp in southern Georgia. See my recent post @NatGeo for a map showing our route, alongside the route of a 2015 expedition (also supported by NGS), that followed the western reaches of the Corridor from the Everglades Headwaters near Orlando around the Gulf Coast to Alabama. My next several posts will share photos from these expeditions. This photo shows the bow of my kayak pointed at the largest protected mangrove coastline in the Western Hemisphere in Everglades National Park on the first day of the Expedition. See @carltonward for a crocodile draped over mangrove roots from earlier that day. We didn’t see people outside our team for several days as we explored the vast watery wilderness of this World Heritage Area that arguably has the most to lose if we fail to protect a corridor to keep the Everglades connected to its headwaters in Central Florida and the rest of the country beyond. My current #PathofthePanther project with @NatGeo is working to bring more attention to this same issue through the story of the endangered Florida panther, because without protecting a wildlife corridor to the north, the panther will have no path to recovery. The clock is ticking as 1000 people move to Florida each day. Five million acres of the Corridor are projected to be lost by 2070 if development continues along its current sprawling pattern.@insidenatgeo. #everglades #expedition #FloridaWild #KeepFLWild. Expedition members not pictured: @mallorydimmitt @joeguthrie8 and @filmnatureman.


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Photo by @CarltonWard // One of my camera traps, which I checked last week, produced this photo of a bobcat winding it's way through cypress knees and over a downed tree in Florida Panther National Wildlife Refuge. This is one of my favorite and most challenging camera sites. My goal is to show an endangered Florida panther amidst the quintessential south Florida swamp habitat that has been necessary for its survival during the past century. But since I first placed a camera trap here in 2015, the swamp has been flooded with water for 70 percent of the time. I've captured an amazing alligator photo, some good bear shots, and now this bobcat, but not yet a panther image that rises to the promise of this location. And now the rainy season has started again. Hopefully I'll get a couple more weeks of when this drainage is still a dry trail, and maybe a panther will come through. If not, it will be another 8 months before the water subsides and I can try again. Meanwhile, I am thankful for this bobcat that came through in the twilight hours to show off its beautiful forest home. My #PathofthePanther project with @NatGeo is about using the story of the Florida panther to inspire appreciation and protection of the Florida Wildlife Corridor so we can keep the Everglades connected to the rest of America and provide and path for the northward expansion and recovery of the panther, for the benefit of all of the other species (and people) who rely on its domain. Please follow @CarltonWard for more hidden wildlife. @FL_WildCorridor @USFWS @myfwc #FloridaWild #KeepFLWild


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Help save Florida Wildlife just by sharing this story🍃🐾🐆🦅🦉🐊 #Repost @natgeo with @get_repost
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Photos by @CarltonWard >>> My first grant from the National Geographic Society was for the first Florida Wildlife Corridor Expedition (2012). Starting in Everglades National Park at the southern tip of the Florida peninsula, our team paddled, hiked and biked 1,000+ miles in 100 consecutive days, tracing the last remaining wildlife corridor still connecting the Everglades north to the Okefenokee Swamp in southern Georgia. Swipe right for a map showing our route, alongside the route of our 2015 expedition (also supported by NGS) that followed the western reaches of the Corridor from the Everglades Headwaters near Orlando around the Gulf Coast to Alabama. My next few posts will share photos from these expeditions, starting with a moment during the first week when Joe Guthrie (background) and I were push poling our kayaks through the sawgrass of the Shark River Slough in the heart of Everglades National Park (remote camera mounted to my bow). See @carltonward for a photo of a crocodile we saw on our first day paddling. We didn’t see people outside our team for several days as we explored the vast watery wilderness of this World Heritage Area that arguably has the most to lose if we fail to protect a corridor to keep the Everglades connected to its headwaters in Central Florida and the rest of the country beyond. My current #PathofthePanther project with @NatGeo is working to bring more attention to this same issue through the story of the endangered Florida panther, because without protecting a wildlife corridor to the north, the panther will have no path to recovery. The clock is ticking as 1000 people move to Florida each day. Five million acres of the Corridor are projected to be lost by 2070 if development continues to sprawl on its current trajectory. The third photo shows new development squeezing a fragile bottleneck in the Corridor near Orlando. Please share this story so we can help save the #FloridaWildlifeCorridor please and connect with me @carltonward. @fl_wildcorridor @insidenatgeo. #everglades #expedition #FloridaWild #KeepFLWild.


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Photo by @CarltonWard // My first grant from the National Geographic Society was for the first Florida Wildlife Corridor Expedition (2012). Starting in Everglades National Park at the southern tip of the Florida peninsula, our team paddled, hiked and biked 1,000+ miles in 100 consecutive days, tracing the last remaining wildlife corridor still connecting the Everglades north to the Okefenokee Swamp in southern Georgia. See my recent post @NatGeo for a map showing our route, alongside the route of a 2015 expedition (also supported by NGS), that followed the western reaches of the Corridor from the Everglades Headwaters near Orlando around the Gulf Coast to Alabama. My next several posts will share photos from these expeditions. This photo shows the bow of my kayak pointed at the largest protected mangrove coastline in the Western Hemisphere in Everglades National Park on the first day of the Expedition. See @carltonward for a crocodile draped over mangrove roots from earlier that day. We didn’t see people outside our team for several days as we explored the vast watery wilderness of this World Heritage Area that arguably has the most to lose if we fail to protect a corridor to keep the Everglades connected to its headwaters in Central Florida and the rest of the country beyond. My current #PathofthePanther project with @NatGeo is working to bring more attention to this same issue through the story of the endangered Florida panther, because without protecting a wildlife corridor to the north, the panther will have no path to recovery. The clock is ticking as 1000 people move to Florida each day. Five million acres of the Corridor are projected to be lost by 2070 if development continues along its current sprawling pattern.@insidenatgeo. #everglades #expedition #FloridaWild #KeepFLWild. Expedition members not pictured: @mallorydimmitt @joeguthrie8 and @filmnatureman.


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Photo by @CarltonWard // My first grant from the National Geographic Society was for the first Florida Wildlife Corridor Expedition (2012). Starting in Everglades National Park at the southern tip of the Florida peninsula, our team paddled, hiked and biked 1,000+ miles in 100 consecutive days, tracing the last remaining wildlife corridor still connecting the Everglades north to the Okefenokee Swamp in southern Georgia. See my recent post @NatGeo for a map showing our route, alongside the route of a 2015 expedition (also supported by NGS), that followed the western reaches of the Corridor from the Everglades Headwaters near Orlando around the Gulf Coast to Alabama. My next several posts will share photos from these expeditions. This photo shows the bow of my kayak pointed at the largest protected mangrove coastline in the Western Hemisphere in Everglades National Park on the first day of the Expedition. See @carltonward for a crocodile draped over mangrove roots from earlier that day. We didn’t see people outside our team for several days as we explored the vast watery wilderness of this World Heritage Area that arguably has the most to lose if we fail to protect a corridor to keep the Everglades connected to its headwaters in Central Florida and the rest of the country beyond. My current #PathofthePanther project with @NatGeo is working to bring more attention to this same issue through the story of the endangered Florida panther, because without protecting a wildlife corridor to the north, the panther will have no path to recovery. The clock is ticking as 1000 people move to Florida each day. Five million acres of the Corridor are projected to be lost by 2070 if development continues along its current sprawling pattern.@insidenatgeo. #everglades #expedition #FloridaWild #KeepFLWild. Expedition members not pictured: @mallorydimmitt @joeguthrie8 and @filmnatureman.
Inspired by @natgeotravel


2

Photos by @CarltonWard >>> My first grant from the National Geographic Society was for the first Florida Wildlife Corridor Expedition (2012). Starting in Everglades National Park at the southern tip of the Florida peninsula, our team paddled, hiked and biked 1,000+ miles in 100 consecutive days, tracing the last remaining wildlife corridor still connecting the Everglades north to the Okefenokee Swamp in southern Georgia. Swipe right for a map showing our route, alongside the route of our 2015 expedition (also supported by NGS) that followed the western reaches of the Corridor from the Everglades Headwaters near Orlando around the Gulf Coast to Alabama. My next few posts will share photos from these expeditions, starting with a moment during the first week when Joe Guthrie (background) and I were push poling our kayaks through the sawgrass of the Shark River Slough in the heart of Everglades National Park (remote camera mounted to my bow). See @carltonward for a photo of a crocodile we saw on our first day paddling. We didn’t see people outside our team for several days as we explored the vast watery wilderness of this World Heritage Area that arguably has the most to lose if we fail to protect a corridor to keep the Everglades connected to its headwaters in Central Florida and the rest of the country beyond. My current #PathofthePanther project with @NatGeo is working to bring more attention to this same issue through the story of the endangered Florida panther, because without protecting a wildlife corridor to the north, the panther will have no path to recovery. The clock is ticking as 1000 people move to Florida each day. Five million acres of the Corridor are projected to be lost by 2070 if development continues to sprawl on its current trajectory. The third photo shows new development squeezing a fragile bottleneck in the Corridor near Orlando. Please share this story so we can help save the #FloridaWildlifeCorridor please and connect with me @carltonward. @fl_wildcorridor @insidenatgeo. #everglades #expedition #FloridaWild #KeepFLWild. Expedition members not pictured: @mallorydimmitt @filmnatureman.


1

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Photo by @CarltonWard // My first grant from the National Geographic Society was for the first Florida Wildlife Corridor Expedition (2012). Starting in Everglades National Park at the southern tip of the Florida peninsula, our team paddled, hiked and biked 1,000+ miles in 100 consecutive days, tracing the last remaining wildlife corridor still connecting the Everglades north to the Okefenokee Swamp in southern Georgia. See my recent post @NatGeo for a map showing our route, alongside the route of a 2015 expedition (also supported by NGS), that followed the western reaches of the Corridor from the Everglades Headwaters near Orlando around the Gulf Coast to Alabama. My next several posts will share photos from these expeditions. This photo shows the bow of my kayak pointed at the largest protected mangrove coastline in the Western Hemisphere in Everglades National Park on the first day of the Expedition. See @carltonward for a crocodile draped over mangrove roots from earlier that day. We didn’t see people outside our team for several days as we explored the vast watery wilderness of this World Heritage Area that arguably has the most to lose if we fail to protect a corridor to keep the Everglades connected to its headwaters in Central Florida and the rest of the country beyond. My current #PathofthePanther project with @NatGeo is working to bring more attention to this same issue through the story of the endangered Florida panther, because without protecting a wildlife corridor to the north, the panther will have no path to recovery. The clock is ticking as 1000 people move to Florida each day. Five million acres of the Corridor are projected to be lost by 2070 if development continues along its current sprawling pattern.@insidenatgeo. #everglades #expedition #FloridaWild #KeepFLWild. Expedition members not pictured: @mallorydimmitt @joeguthrie8 and @filmnatureman.
Inspired by @natgeotravel


2

Photo by @CarltonWard // My first grant from the National Geographic Society was for the first Florida Wildlife Corridor Expedition (2012). Starting in Everglades National Park at the southern tip of the Florida peninsula, our team paddled, hiked and biked 1,000+ miles in 100 consecutive days, tracing the last remaining wildlife corridor still connecting the Everglades north to the Okefenokee Swamp in southern Georgia. See my recent post @NatGeo for a map showing our route, alongside the route of a 2015 expedition (also supported by NGS), that followed the western reaches of the Corridor from the Everglades Headwaters near Orlando around the Gulf Coast to Alabama. My next several posts will share photos from these expeditions. This photo shows the bow of my kayak pointed at the largest protected mangrove coastline in the Western Hemisphere in Everglades National Park on the first day of the Expedition. See @carltonward for a crocodile draped over mangrove roots from earlier that day. We didn’t see people outside our team for several days as we explored the vast watery wilderness of this World Heritage Area that arguably has the most to lose if we fail to protect a corridor to keep the Everglades connected to its headwaters in Central Florida and the rest of the country beyond. My current #PathofthePanther project with @NatGeo is working to bring more attention to this same issue through the story of the endangered Florida panther, because without protecting a wildlife corridor to the north, the panther will have no path to recovery. The clock is ticking as 1000 people move to Florida each day. Five million acres of the Corridor are projected to be lost by 2070 if development continues along its current sprawling pattern.@insidenatgeo. #everglades #expedition #FloridaWild #KeepFLWild. Expedition members not pictured: @mallorydimmitt @joeguthrie8 and @filmnatureman.


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From @natgeo:
Photos by @CarltonWard >>> My first grant from the National Geographic Society was for the first Florida Wildlife Corridor Expedition (2012). Starting in Everglades National Park at the southern tip of the Florida peninsula, our team paddled, hiked and biked 1,000+ miles in 100 consecutive days, tracing the last remaining wildlife corridor still connecting the Everglades north to the Okefenokee Swamp in southern Georgia. Swipe right for a map showing our route, alongside the route of our 2015 expedition (also supported by NGS) that followed the western reaches of the Corridor from the Everglades Headwaters near Orlando around the Gulf Coast to Alabama. My next few posts will share photos from these expeditions, starting with a moment during the first week when Joe Guthrie (background) and I were push poling our kayaks through the sawgrass of the Shark River Slough in the heart of Everglades National Park (remote camera mounted to my bow). See @carltonward for a photo of a crocodile we saw on our first day paddling. We didn’t see people outside our team for several days as we explored the vast watery wilderness of this World Heritage Area that arguably has the most to lose if we fail to protect a corridor to keep the Everglades connected to its headwaters in Central Florida and the rest of the country beyond. My current #PathofthePanther project with @NatGeo is working to bring more attention to this same issue through the story of the endangered Florida panther, because without protecting a wildlife corridor to the north, the panther will have no path to recovery. The clock is ticking as 1000 people move to Florida each day. Five million acres of the Corridor are projected to be lost by 2070 if development continues to sprawl on its current trajectory. The third photo shows new development squeezing a fragile bottleneck in the Corridor near Orlando. Please share this story so we can help save the #FloridaWildlifeCorridor please and connect with me @carltonward. @fl_wildcorridor @insidenatgeo. #everglades #expedition #FloridaWild #KeepFLWild. Expedition members not pictured: @mallorydimmitt @filmnatureman.


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Photo by @CarltonWard // My first grant from the National Geographic Society was for the first Florida Wildlife Corridor Expedition (2012). Starting in Everglades National Park at the southern tip of the Florida peninsula, our team paddled, hiked and biked 1,000+ miles in 100 consecutive days, tracing the last remaining wildlife corridor still connecting the Everglades north to the Okefenokee Swamp in southern Georgia. See my recent post @NatGeo for a map showing our route, alongside the route of a 2015 expedition (also supported by NGS), that followed the western reaches of the Corridor from the Everglades Headwaters near Orlando around the Gulf Coast to Alabama. My next several posts will share photos from these expeditions. This photo shows the bow of my kayak pointed at the largest protected mangrove coastline in the Western Hemisphere in Everglades National Park on the first day of the Expedition. See @carltonward for a crocodile draped over mangrove roots from earlier that day. We didn’t see people outside our team for several days as we explored the vast watery wilderness of this World Heritage Area that arguably has the most to lose if we fail to protect a corridor to keep the Everglades connected to its headwaters in Central Florida and the rest of the country beyond. My current #PathofthePanther project with @NatGeo is working to bring more attention to this same issue through the story of the endangered Florida panther, because without protecting a wildlife corridor to the north, the panther will have no path to recovery. The clock is ticking as 1000 people move to Florida each day. Five million acres of the Corridor are projected to be lost by 2070 if development continues along its current sprawling pattern.@insidenatgeo. #everglades #expedition #FloridaWild #KeepFLWild. Expedition members not pictured: @mallorydimmitt @joeguthrie8 and @filmnatureman.


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Photos by @CarltonWard >>> My first grant from the National Geographic Society was for the first Florida Wildlife Corridor Expedition (2012). Starting in Everglades National Park at the southern tip of the Florida peninsula, our team paddled, hiked and biked 1,000+ miles in 100 consecutive days, tracing the last remaining wildlife corridor still connecting the Everglades north to the Okefenokee Swamp in southern Georgia. Swipe right for a map showing our route, alongside the route of our 2015 expedition (also supported by NGS) that followed the western reaches of the Corridor from the Everglades Headwaters near Orlando around the Gulf Coast to Alabama. My next few posts will share photos from these expeditions, starting with a moment during the first week when Joe Guthrie (background) and I were push poling our kayaks through the sawgrass of the Shark River Slough in the heart of Everglades National Park (remote camera mounted to my bow). See @carltonward for a photo of a crocodile we saw on our first day paddling. We didn’t see people outside our team for several days as we explored the vast watery wilderness of this World Heritage Area that arguably has the most to lose if we fail to protect a corridor to keep the Everglades connected to its headwaters in Central Florida and the rest of the country beyond. My current #PathofthePanther project with @NatGeo is working to bring more attention to this same issue through the story of the endangered Florida panther, because without protecting a wildlife corridor to the north, the panther will have no path to recovery. The clock is ticking as 1000 people move to Florida each day. Five million acres of the Corridor are projected to be lost by 2070 if development continues to sprawl on its current trajectory. The third photo shows new development squeezing a fragile bottleneck in the Corridor near Orlando. Please share this story so we can help save the #FloridaWildlifeCorridor please and connect with me @carltonward. @fl_wildcorridor @insidenatgeo. #everglades #expedition #FloridaWild #KeepFLWild. Expedition members not pictured: @mallorydimmitt @filmnatureman.


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During the next few days I’ll be sharing some photos from the Florida Wildlife Corridor Expeditions. For the first Expedition, our team started in Everglades National Park at the southern tip of the Florida peninsula, and paddled, hiked and biked 1,000+ miles over 100 consecutive days, tracing the last remaining wildlife corridor still connecting the Everglades north to the Okefenokee Swamp in southern Georgia. See my recent post @NatGeo for a map showing our route, alongside the route of the 2015 expedition that followed the western reaches of the Corridor from the Everglades Headwaters near Orlando around the Gulf Coast to Alabama. This photo shows a crocodile sunning itself on mangrove roots in the brackish waters where the estuary meets Florida Bay. Everglades National Park holds the largest protected mangrove coastline in the Western Hemisphere. We didn’t see people outside our team for several days of the Expedition as we explored the vast watery wilderness of this World Heritage Area that arguably has the most to lose if we fail to protect a corridor to keep the Everglades connected to its headwaters in Central Florida and the rest of the country beyond. My current #PathofthePanther project with @NatGeo is working to bring more attention to this same issue through the story of the endangered Florida panther, because without protecting a wildlife corridor to the north, the panther will have no path to recovery. The clock is ticking as 1000 people move to Florida each day. Five million acres of the Corridor are projected to be lost by 2070 if development continues along its current sprawling trajectory. @insidenatgeo. #everglades #expedition #FloridaWild #KeepFLWild @evergladesnps. With @mallorydimmitt @joeguthrie8 and @filmnatureman.


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