#roadtripto2070

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#roadtripto2070#RG#Regram#Repost#climatestrike#repost#roadtrip#landscape#sunrise#santamonicapier#gretathunberg#californiadreaming#climatechange#greta#onassignment#serendipity#california

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#Repost @earthalliance with @get_repost
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#Regram #RG @natgeo: Video by David Guttenfelder @dguttenfelder | What progress are we making against climate change? Look around. California next year will require solar panels on new homes. In Los Angeles—hot rod city, where Jan and Dean hit “Dead Man’s Curve,” where custom auto body shops are as common as Starbucks—the mayor wants 25,000 vehicle charging stations by 2025, in advance of transitioning 80 percent of the city's seven million cars to electric vehicles by 2035. Cross the Pacific Coast Highway north of L.A., where a wildfire worsened by searing heat and drought last fall scorched homes on both sides, and roll on into the dusty desert just outside Bakersfield. Here, in Kern County, pump jacks still bob at two of the country's five largest oil fields, but the tumbleweeds and Joshua trees are now broken by 5,000 turbines churning out carbon-free electricity—the greatest concentration of wind power in the world, according to the U.S. Geological Survey. Below these turbines, gleaming banks of solar panels now line fields long fallow for lack of water. This is how it starts. Globally, the price of wind and solar has plummeted. Nationwide, the federal Energy Information Agency suspects, the share of U.S. electricity generated by renewables will jump an extraordinary three percent between 2018 and 2020. But that brings the overall total to just 13 percent. Meanwhile, the U.S. also will become a net energy exporter in 2020—largely through sales of oil and natural gas. We recently began crossing the country in a series of electric cars, trying to chart our progress toward a cleaner-energy future. Text by Craig Welch @craigwelch. Follow @natgeo for regular dispatches. #roadtripto2070


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#Regram #RG @natgeo: Video by David Guttenfelder @dguttenfelder | What progress are we making against climate change? Look around. California next year will require solar panels on new homes. In Los Angeles—hot rod city, where Jan and Dean hit “Dead Man’s Curve,” where custom auto body shops are as common as Starbucks—the mayor wants 25,000 vehicle charging stations by 2025, in advance of transitioning 80 percent of the city's seven million cars to electric vehicles by 2035. Cross the Pacific Coast Highway north of L.A., where a wildfire worsened by searing heat and drought last fall scorched homes on both sides, and roll on into the dusty desert just outside Bakersfield. Here, in Kern County, pump jacks still bob at two of the country's five largest oil fields, but the tumbleweeds and Joshua trees are now broken by 5,000 turbines churning out carbon-free electricity—the greatest concentration of wind power in the world, according to the U.S. Geological Survey. Below these turbines, gleaming banks of solar panels now line fields long fallow for lack of water. This is how it starts. Globally, the price of wind and solar has plummeted. Nationwide, the federal Energy Information Agency suspects, the share of U.S. electricity generated by renewables will jump an extraordinary three percent between 2018 and 2020. But that brings the overall total to just 13 percent. Meanwhile, the U.S. also will become a net energy exporter in 2020—largely through sales of oil and natural gas. We recently began crossing the country in a series of electric cars, trying to chart our progress toward a cleaner-energy future. Text by Craig Welch @craigwelch. Follow @natgeo for regular dispatches. #roadtripto2070


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#Repost @earthalliance

#Regram #RG @natgeo: Video by David Guttenfelder @dguttenfelder | What progress are we making against climate change? Look around. California next year will require solar panels on new homes. In Los Angeles—hot rod city, where Jan and Dean hit “Dead Man’s Curve,” where custom auto body shops are as common as Starbucks—the mayor wants 25,000 vehicle charging stations by 2025, in advance of transitioning 80 percent of the city's seven million cars to electric vehicles by 2035. Cross the Pacific Coast Highway north of L.A., where a wildfire worsened by searing heat and drought last fall scorched homes on both sides, and roll on into the dusty desert just outside Bakersfield. Here, in Kern County, pump jacks still bob at two of the country's five largest oil fields, but the tumbleweeds and Joshua trees are now broken by 5,000 turbines churning out carbon-free electricity—the greatest concentration of wind power in the world, according to the U.S. Geological Survey. Below these turbines, gleaming banks of solar panels now line fields long fallow for lack of water. This is how it starts. Globally, the price of wind and solar has plummeted. Nationwide, the federal Energy Information Agency suspects, the share of U.S. electricity generated by renewables will jump an extraordinary three percent between 2018 and 2020. But that brings the overall total to just 13 percent. Meanwhile, the U.S. also will become a net energy exporter in 2020—largely through sales of oil and natural gas. We recently began crossing the country in a series of electric cars, trying to chart our progress toward a cleaner-energy future. Text by Craig Welch @craigwelch. Follow @natgeo for regular dispatches. #roadtripto2070


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#Repost @earthalliance

#Regram #RG @natgeo: Video by David Guttenfelder @dguttenfelder | What progress are we making against climate change? Look around. California next year will require solar panels on new homes. In Los Angeles—hot rod city, where Jan and Dean hit “Dead Man’s Curve,” where custom auto body shops are as common as Starbucks—the mayor wants 25,000 vehicle charging stations by 2025, in advance of transitioning 80 percent of the city's seven million cars to electric vehicles by 2035. Cross the Pacific Coast Highway north of L.A., where a wildfire worsened by searing heat and drought last fall scorched homes on both sides, and roll on into the dusty desert just outside Bakersfield. Here, in Kern County, pump jacks still bob at two of the country's five largest oil fields, but the tumbleweeds and Joshua trees are now broken by 5,000 turbines churning out carbon-free electricity—the greatest concentration of wind power in the world, according to the U.S. Geological Survey. Below these turbines, gleaming banks of solar panels now line fields long fallow for lack of water. This is how it starts. Globally, the price of wind and solar has plummeted. Nationwide, the federal Energy Information Agency suspects, the share of U.S. electricity generated by renewables will jump an extraordinary three percent between 2018 and 2020. But that brings the overall total to just 13 percent. Meanwhile, the U.S. also will become a net energy exporter in 2020—largely through sales of oil and natural gas. We recently began crossing the country in a series of electric cars, trying to chart our progress toward a cleaner-energy future. Text by Craig Welch @craigwelch. Follow @natgeo for regular dispatches. #roadtripto2070


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#Repost #RG @natgeo: Video by David Guttenfelder @dguttenfelder | What progress are we making against climate change? Look around. California next year will require solar panels on new homes. In Los Angeles—hot rod city, where Jan and Dean hit “Dead Man’s Curve,” where custom auto body shops are as common as Starbucks—the mayor wants 25,000 vehicle charging stations by 2025, in advance of transitioning 80 percent of the city's seven million cars to electric vehicles by 2035. Cross the Pacific Coast Highway north of L.A., where a wildfire worsened by searing heat and drought last fall scorched homes on both sides, and roll on into the dusty desert just outside Bakersfield. Here, in Kern County, pump jacks still bob at two of the country's five largest oil fields, but the tumbleweeds and Joshua trees are now broken by 5,000 turbines churning out carbon-free electricity—the greatest concentration of wind power in the world, according to the U.S. Geological Survey. Below these turbines, gleaming banks of solar panels now line fields long fallow for lack of water. This is how it starts. Globally, the price of wind and solar has plummeted. Nationwide, the federal Energy Information Agency suspects, the share of U.S. electricity generated by renewables will jump an extraordinary three percent between 2018 and 2020. But that brings the overall total to just 13 percent. Meanwhile, the U.S. also will become a net energy exporter in 2020—largely through sales of oil and natural gas. We recently began crossing the country in a series of electric cars, trying to chart our progress toward a cleaner-energy future. Text by Craig Welch @craigwelch. Follow @natgeo for regular dispatches. #roadtripto2070


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#Regram #RG @natgeo: Video by David Guttenfelder @dguttenfelder | What progress are we making against climate change? Look around. California next year will require solar panels on new homes. In Los Angeles—hot rod city, where Jan and Dean hit “Dead Man’s Curve,” where custom auto body shops are as common as Starbucks—the mayor wants 25,000 vehicle charging stations by 2025, in advance of transitioning 80 percent of the city's seven million cars to electric vehicles by 2035. Cross the Pacific Coast Highway north of L.A., where a wildfire worsened by searing heat and drought last fall scorched homes on both sides, and roll on into the dusty desert just outside Bakersfield. Here, in Kern County, pump jacks still bob at two of the country's five largest oil fields, but the tumbleweeds and Joshua trees are now broken by 5,000 turbines churning out carbon-free electricity—the greatest concentration of wind power in the world, according to the U.S. Geological Survey. Below these turbines, gleaming banks of solar panels now line fields long fallow for lack of water. This is how it starts. Globally, the price of wind and solar has plummeted. Nationwide, the federal Energy Information Agency suspects, the share of U.S. electricity generated by renewables will jump an extraordinary three percent between 2018 and 2020. But that brings the overall total to just 13 percent. Meanwhile, the U.S. also will become a net energy exporter in 2020—largely through sales of oil and natural gas. We recently began crossing the country in a series of electric cars, trying to chart our progress toward a cleaner-energy future. Text by Craig Welch @craigwelch. Follow @natgeo for regular dispatches. #roadtripto2070


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Ну теперь я могу быть спокоен за мою Кукурузу🌽🤣 Greta Thunberg приехала в «мою» Айову учить местных университетских глобальному изменению климата! 🌐😁 Look who we ran into on our @natgeo renewable energy road trip. Greta Thunberg came to Iowa City, Iowa to lead local students’ #climatestrike. #roadtripto2070 @gretathunberg


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#repost @dguttenfelder
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Look who we ran into on our @natgeo renewable energy road trip. Greta Thunberg came to Iowa City, Iowa to lead local students’ #climatestrike. #roadtripto2070 @gretathunberg


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Can we just get off the dirty junk?!? 🦄🌞🦄Posted @withrepost@natgeo Video by David Guttenfelder @dguttenfelder | What progress are we making against climate change? Look around. California next year will require solar panels on new homes. In Los Angeles—hot rod city, where Jan and Dean hit “Dead Man’s Curve,” where custom auto body shops are as common as Starbucks—the mayor wants 25,000 vehicle charging stations by 2025, in advance of transitioning 80 percent of the city's seven million cars to electric vehicles by 2035. Cross the Pacific Coast Highway north of L.A., where a wildfire worsened by searing heat and drought last fall scorched homes on both sides, and roll on into the dusty desert just outside Bakersfield. Here, in Kern County, pump jacks still bob at two of the country's five largest oil fields, but the tumbleweeds and Joshua trees are now broken by 5,000 turbines churning out carbon-free electricity—the greatest concentration of wind power in the world, according to the U.S. Geological Survey. Below these turbines, gleaming banks of solar panels now line fields long fallow for lack of water. This is how it starts. Globally, the price of wind and solar has plummeted. Nationwide, the federal Energy Information Agency suspects, the share of U.S. electricity generated by renewables will jump an extraordinary three percent between 2018 and 2020. But that brings the overall total to just 13 percent. Meanwhile, the U.S. also will become a net energy exporter in 2020—largely through sales of oil and natural gas. We recently began crossing the country in a series of electric cars, trying to chart our progress toward a cleaner-energy future. Text by Craig Welch @craigwelch. Follow us for regular dispatches. #roadtripto2070


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Video by David Guttenfelder @dguttenfelder | What progress are we making against climate change? Look around. California next year will require solar panels on new homes. In Los Angeles—hot rod city, where Jan and Dean hit “Dead Man’s Curve,” where custom auto body shops are as common as Starbucks—the mayor wants 25,000 vehicle charging stations by 2025, in advance of transitioning 80 percent of the city's seven million cars to electric vehicles by 2035. Cross the Pacific Coast Highway north of L.A., where a wildfire worsened by searing heat and drought last fall scorched homes on both sides, and roll on into the dusty desert just outside Bakersfield. Here, in Kern County, pump jacks still bob at two of the country's five largest oil fields, but the tumbleweeds and Joshua trees are now broken by 5,000 turbines churning out carbon-free electricity—the greatest concentration of wind power in the world, according to the U.S. Geological Survey. Below these turbines, gleaming banks of solar panels now line fields long fallow for lack of water. This is how it starts. Globally, the price of wind and solar has plummeted. Nationwide, the federal Energy Information Agency suspects, the share of U.S. electricity generated by renewables will jump an extraordinary three percent between 2018 and 2020. But that brings the overall total to just 13 percent. Meanwhile, the U.S. also will become a net energy exporter in 2020—largely through sales of oil and natural gas. We recently began crossing the country in a series of electric cars, trying to chart our progress toward a cleaner-energy future. Text by Craig Welch @craigwelch. Follow us for regular dispatches. #roadtripto2070


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Look who we ran into on our @natgeo renewable energy road trip. Greta Thunberg came to Iowa City, Iowa to lead local students’ #climatestrike. #roadtripto2070 @gretathunberg


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Rolled into Des Moines super late last night from our cross-country climate change reporting trip. Rose early this a.m. to learn @gretathunberg was speaking a few hours away. #serendipity #onassignment for @natgeo #roadtripto2070 w/ @dguttenfelder in the Midwest. #gretathunberg #greta #climatechange


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Photo by David Guttenfelder @dguttenfelder | Kerouac. Bess and Harry Truman in their Chrysler New Yorker. A burned-out Steinbeck in his pickup. Zelda and F. Scott Fitzgerald's "Rolling Junk" cruise. Since 1903, when Horatio Jackson bounced along with his bedroll and his bulldog Bud in a red 20-horsepower Winton touring carriage he named Vermont—the first successful U.S. cross-country journey by car—Americans have taken to the automobile and the open road. The road is a time for remembering and forgetting, for moving ahead and getting lost on purpose, where the journey is the destination. So it has been with us. A few days into our journey, we left Mojave, California, in search of salt flats and scorched sand and found our way into the empty Panamint Valley. At the cut-off toward Death Valley, we pulled off for a minute and stared down the long highway shimmering in the evening heat. We'd done the math and thought we could make it to the next charging station before our electric vehicle's power drained. But that's not the same as being certain. We forged on. The road is a place of transitions and choices. The best path isn't always obvious. We are crossing the country in a series of electric cars, trying to chart our progress toward a cleaner-energy future. Text by Craig Welch @craigwelch. Follow us for regular stops along the way. #roadtripto2070


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Photo by David Guttenfelder @dguttenfelder | Kerouac. Bess and Harry Truman in their Chrysler New Yorker. A burned-out Steinbeck in his pickup. Zelda and F. Scott Fitzgerald's "Rolling Junk" cruise. Since 1903, when Horatio Jackson bounced along with his bedroll and his bulldog Bud in a red 20-horsepower Winton touring carriage he named Vermont—the first successful U.S. cross-country journey by car—Americans have taken to the automobile and the open road. The road is a time for remembering and forgetting, for moving ahead and getting lost on purpose, where the journey is the destination. So it has been with us. A few days into our journey, we left Mojave, California, in search of salt flats and scorched sand and found our way into the empty Panamint Valley. At the cut-off toward Death Valley, we pulled off for a minute and stared down the long highway shimmering in the evening heat. We'd done the math and thought we could make it to the next charging station before our electric vehicle's power drained. But that's not the same as being certain. We forged on. The road is a place of transitions and choices. The best path isn't always obvious. We are crossing the country in a series of electric cars, trying to chart our progress toward a cleaner-energy future. Text by Craig Welch @craigwelch. Follow us for regular stops along the way. #roadtripto2070


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A solar-powered Ferris wheel😍☀️
It’s been almost a year since raging wildfires swept across California...where are we now? Thousands of us were displaced - some for good. What have we learned? Tomorrow is October 1st and Summer still lingers. We wonder how many of you have taken those tragic events and turned them into hope. Hope for a more eco-friendly, better and brighter future - one where we can steal so much heat and electricity from the sun (not from the ground) - it carries us to the top of the world🎡

#repost @natgeo
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Photo by David Guttenfelder @dguttenfelder, text by Craig Welch | Between the photo booths and the pretzel stands, not far from the electric violin player and the man who molds busts of tourists out of clay, sits the world's first solar-powered ferris wheel. The Santa Monica Pier is the place where America's Mother Road—Route 66—meets the Pacific, a fixture of the Los Angeles region, which is the cultural soul of our autocentric nation. But L.A. County, like the rest of the planet, is paying a price for our global dependence on fossil fuels. Following seven years of drought, visitors here last November could stare up into the hills and watch the menacing glow of the region's most destructive wildfire as it forced the evacuation of a quarter million people. Just 18 miles north, Malibu's Broad Beach is no longer so, as rising seas and storms bring this ever narrowing sandy reach right to back porches. Increasing heat threatens the health of many southern CA residents. So this seemed like the perfect place to start an epic journey, a road trip toward the unknown. We are crisscrossing the country in a series of electric cars, trying to examine our progress toward a cleaner energy future. Can we make this transition? Of course we can—if we truly make the effort. But what will it take, how are we doing, and how do we get there? Follow along as we attempt to find out. #roadtripto2070


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Photo by David Guttenfelder @dguttenfelder, text by Craig Welch | Between the photo booths and the pretzel stands, not far from the electric violin player and the man who molds busts of tourists out of clay, sits the world's first solar-powered ferris wheel. The Santa Monica Pier is the place where America's Mother Road—Route 66—meets the Pacific, a fixture of the Los Angeles region, which is the cultural soul of our autocentric nation. But L.A. County, like the rest of the planet, is paying a price for our global dependence on fossil fuels. Following seven years of drought, visitors here last November could stare up into the hills and watch the menacing glow of the region's most destructive wildfire as it forced the evacuation of a quarter million people. Just 18 miles north, Malibu's Broad Beach is no longer so, as rising seas and storms bring this ever narrowing sandy reach right to back porches. Increasing heat threatens the health of many southern CA residents. So this seemed like the perfect place to start an epic journey, a road trip toward the unknown. We are crisscrossing the country in a series of electric cars, trying to examine our progress toward a cleaner energy future. Can we make this transition? Of course we can—if we truly make the effort. But what will it take, how are we doing, and how do we get there? Follow along as we attempt to find out. #roadtripto2070


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Photo by David Guttenfelder @dguttenfelder, text by Craig Welch | Between the photo booths and the pretzel stands, not far from the electric violin player and the man who molds busts of tourists out of clay, sits the world's first solar-powered ferris wheel. The Santa Monica Pier is the place where America's Mother Road—Route 66—meets the Pacific, a fixture of the Los Angeles region, which is the cultural soul of our autocentric nation. But L.A. County, like the rest of the planet, is paying a price for our global dependence on fossil fuels. Following seven years of drought, visitors here last November could stare up into the hills and watch the menacing glow of the region's most destructive wildfire as it forced the evacuation of a quarter million people. Just 18 miles north, Malibu's Broad Beach is no longer so, as rising seas and storms bring this ever narrowing sandy reach right to back porches. Increasing heat threatens the health of many southern CA residents. So this seemed like the perfect place to start an epic journey, a road trip toward the unknown. We are crisscrossing the country in a series of electric cars, trying to examine our progress toward a cleaner energy future. Can we make this transition? Of course we can—if we truly make the effort. But what will it take, how are we doing, and how do we get there? Follow along as we attempt to find out. #roadtripto2070


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It’s the car state, where Jan and Dean hit “Dead Man’s Curve,” where custom auto body shops proliferate like Starbucks, a place where nobody walks if driving is an option. But from Muscle Beach to the Mojave, America’s most profligate gas-guzzling region is also leading a quiet revolution in energy. Where do we go from here? Stay tuned. Repost by @dguttenfelder • California. We started at the Pacific beach, drove through great wind and solar energy fields, crossed harsh Death Valley, and stopped at some of the country’s most unique, cherished landscapes. We’ve only started this @natgeo renewable energy road trip across the USA. Photo captions: 1. Artist’s Palette landscape. 2. Van Life road tripping 3. Furnace Creek Gas Station (said to be the most expensive gas prices in the USA). 4. Santa Monica Pier 5. Badwater Basin, below sea level. #roadtripto2070 w/ @craigwelch #californiadreaming #roadtrip


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California. We started at the Pacific beach, drove through great wind and solar energy fields, crossed harsh Death Valley, and stopped at some of the country’s most unique, cherished landscapes. We’ve only started this @natgeo renewable energy road trip across the USA. Photo captions: 1. Artist’s Palette landscape. 2. Van Life road tripping 3. Furnace Creek Gas Station (said to be the most expensive gas prices in the USA). 4. Santa Monica Pier 5. Badwater Basin, below sea level. #roadtripto2070 w/ @craigwelch


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The highway from Page, AZ winds past the The Navajo Generating Station, the largest coal plant in the western USA. The plant, which emits tens of millions of tons of carbon dioxide each year, has been set to shut down. It’s a big win for the planet. But it’s also a major immediate challenge to the Native American communities that have relied on the jobs the plant has created, pointing to the need to support those impacted in the transition away from fossil fuels.
We’re on a @natgeo renewable energy road trip across the USA. #roadtripto2070 @craigwelch


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Arizona: Road trip music recommendations welcomed. While I’m here, I’ll start with Arizona’s own @casadecalexico. On a @natgeo renewable energy road trip across the USA #roadtripto2070


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Does a clean-energy future demand austerity? Can we still be electricity gluttons? Repost from @dguttenfelder • The bright lights of Las Vegas Boulevard. How would a renewable energy, carbon-free future look? How can we get there? We’re on Day 6 of a @natgeo renewable energy road trip across the USA #roadtripto2070


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When I was a school kid, faded Kodachrome photos in textbooks of the Hoover Dam were held up to us as a grand example of progress, renewable energy, US can-do ingenuity, and a national mobilization during the darkest days of the Great Depression. How will we respond now to climate change and our time’s greatest challenges? What will a renewable energy future look like and how grand of a global mobilization will it take get there?
We’re on Day 8 of a @natgeo renewable energy road trip across the USA. #roadtripto2070.


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Electric car, but I’m still feeling those road trip feelings. Same songs, sunsets, desert drives, and wide open highways. Day 7 of a @natgeo renewable energy road trip across the USA. #roadtripto2070


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The bright lights of Las Vegas Boulevard tonight. How will an renewable energy, carbon-free future look? How can we get there? I’m on Day 6 of a natgeo renewable energy road trip across the USA #roadtripto2070


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Reading the road signs. We’re driving through California’s Death Valley on day 4 of our renewable energy road trip across the USA #roadtripto2070 @natgeo


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We are at the crossroads. * Repost @dguttenfelder Clothing store mannequins face a gas station at a Mojave, California highway intersection. Gas is always easy to find on a classic USA road trip, but we’re not looking for gas as we cross the USA in our electric vehicles. Traveling from one charging station to the next is a new, sometimes more complicated, always greener journey. Day 3 of our renewable energy road trip #roadtripto2070 for @natgeo w/ @craigwelch


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Clothing store mannequins face a gas station at a Mojave, California highway intersection. Gas is always easy to find on a classic USA road trip, but we’re not looking for gas as we cross the USA in our electric vehicles. Traveling from one charging station to the next is a new, sometimes more complicated, always greener journey. Day 3 of our renewable energy road trip #roadtripto2070 for @natgeo w/ @craigwelch


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Wind power at Tehachapi Pass near Mojave, California on Day 2 of our renewable energy road trip across the USA. #roadtripto2070 for @natgeo Sept. 9, 2019


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Repost @dguttenfelder Beginning at sunrise beneath the solar-powered Ferris wheel on Santa Monica pier, today we’re starting a renewable energy road trip across the USA. #roadtripto2070 for @natgeo w/ @craigwelch Sept. 8, 2019
#santamonicapier #sunrise #landscape #california


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