#signsofyouridentity

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#signsofyouridentity#pulitzercenter#stolengenerations#photography#australia#justelimage#canada#indigenous#blackandwhite#fujifeed#fotografo#fotografia#sunset#photographer#friendsinperson#blackandwhitephotography#MattBlack#photojournalism#firstnations#nativeamerican#hereweare#resistandreclaim#MW24#opensociety

Hashtags #signsofyouridentity for Instagram

Photo by @dzalcman | I'm back on the road to continue work on @signsofyouridentity, an ongoing project on the legacy of coercive assimilation education in indigenous communities. This is Lisa Schrader, a Lakota woman who attended St. Joseph’s Indian School and Red Cloud Indian School. “Healing requires acknowledgement,” Lisa said. “And when we were taken away from our homes and we lost our language, and we lost our culture, and we lost our identity, no one ever told us, Welcome home. I’m glad you made it back.” #signsofyouridentity


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Amazing images of the wold #fallout #pablish #pepale #fallo #animals #signsofyouridentity


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Daniella Zalcman, Pulitzer Center grantee and award-winning photojournalist, visited ABS 8th graders today to talk about her Signs of Your Identity project, asking questions like "why don't we tell complete stories about our history?" and "how can we be more careful with the context of our images so that they send the message we intend?” Part of Zalcman’s own response to the latter question was to create multiple exposure portraits, overlaying images of Native American men and women with sites and objects from their past. Later this year, 8th graders will create their own self portraits using the multiple exposure technique. Thank you, @dzalcman, for sharing these important stories with us again this year!

#signsofyouridentity #theartsbasedschool #dtws


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Photo by @dzalcman | I'm back on the road to continue work on @signsofyouridentity, an ongoing project on the legacy of coercive assimilation education in indigenous communities. This is Lisa Schrader, a Lakota woman who attended St. Joseph’s Indian School and Red Cloud Indian School. “Healing requires acknowledgement,” Lisa said. “And when we were taken away from our homes and we lost our language, and we lost our culture, and we lost our identity, no one ever told us, Welcome home. I’m glad you made it back.” #signsofyouridentity


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Photo by @dzalcman | I'm back on the road to continue work on @signsofyouridentity, an ongoing project on the legacy of coercive assimilation education in indigenous communities. This is Lisa Schrader, a Lakota woman who attended St. Joseph’s Indian School and Red Cloud Indian School. “Healing requires acknowledgement,” Lisa said. “And when we were taken away from our homes and we lost our language, and we lost our culture, and we lost our identity, no one ever told us, Welcome home. I’m glad you made it back.” #signsofyouridentity


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Lisa Schrader (Lakota) went to both St. Joe’s Indian School and Red Cloud Indian School in South Dakota. “Healing requires acknowledgement,” she said. “And when we were taken away from our homes and we lost our language and we lost our culture and we lost our identity, no one ever told us, ‘Welcome home. I’m glad you made it back.’” #signsofyouridentity


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I think I could start an entire project just on archival photos of Indian boarding school sports teams. Here’s one of the Sherman Institute football team (date unknown) currently on display in the Sherman Indian Museum. #signsofyouridentity


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Esther Green | Work in progress in collaboration with @dzalcman of (@signsofyouridentity) alongside @greggdeal @catherinebjewellery ... cannot wait to share more updates with you guys. #signsofyouridentity #photography


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Going through some collected archival photos sitting on my desktop and came across this jarring image of students practicing penmanship at the Red Deer Indian Industrial School in Alberta, Canada. The school operated from 1889-1919. #signsofyouridentity


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The cemetery of the Holy Family Mission, which originally opened as a Catholic boarding school on the Blackfeet Reservation in 1889. The school closed in the early 1940s. #signsofyouridentity


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This is Willie Stevens, a Salish man who attended the Villa Ursula mission school as a day student from 1964-1972. “I come from the generation that lost its language and cultural identity. My parents didn’t want to teach us the language because they knew it would only hurt us. They knew we’d get in trouble at boarding school. So they tried to protect us. They even cut our hair.” #signsofyouridentity @opensocietyfoundations @insidenatgeo


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The site of the Battle of the Greasy Grass, also known as the Battle of the Little Bighorn. #signsofyouridentity


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Boys and girls wash clothes at the Crow Agency boarding school. Photo by Fred E. Miller, from roughly 1890-1900. #signsofyouridentity


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🖤 for #truth
#Repost @natgeo with @get_repost
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Photo by Daniella Zalcman @dzalcman | This is Mike Pinay, a Cree elder who was forcibly sent to the Qu’Appelle Indian Residential School from 1953-1963. “It was the worst ten years of my life. I was away from my family from the age of 6 to 16. How do you learn about relationships, how do you learn about family? I didn’t know what love was. We weren’t even known by names back then; I was a number." Roughly 150,000 Indigenous Canadians were taken away from their families and communities to government funded boarding schools where they were punished if they spoke their languages or practiced their cultures, routinely physically and sexually assaulted, and in extreme cases subjected to medical experimentation and sterilization. The last residential school in Canada closed in 1996. @signsofyouridentity @pulitzercenter #signsofyouridentity


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#Repost @natgeo
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Photo by Daniella Zalcman @dzalcman | This is Mike Pinay, a Cree elder who was forcibly sent to the Qu’Appelle Indian Residential School from 1953-1963. “It was the worst ten years of my life. I was away from my family from the age of 6 to 16. How do you learn about relationships, how do you learn about family? I didn’t know what love was. We weren’t even known by names back then; I was a number." Roughly 150,000 Indigenous Canadians were taken away from their families and communities to government funded boarding schools where they were punished if they spoke their languages or practiced their cultures, routinely physically and sexually assaulted, and in extreme cases subjected to medical experimentation and sterilization. The last residential school in Canada closed in 1996. @signsofyouridentity @pulitzercenter #signsofyouridentity


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Photo by Daniella Zalcman @dzalcman | This is Mike Pinay, a Cree elder who was forcibly sent to the Qu’Appelle Indian Residential School from 1953-1963. “It was the worst ten years of my life. I was away from my family from the age of 6 to 16. How do you learn about relationships, how do you learn about family? I didn’t know what love was. We weren’t even known by names back then; I was a number." Roughly 150,000 Indigenous Canadians were taken away from their families and communities to government funded boarding schools where they were punished if they spoke their languages or practiced their cultures, routinely physically and sexually assaulted, and in extreme cases subjected to medical experimentation and sterilization. The last residential school in Canada closed in 1996. @signsofyouridentity @pulitzercenter #signsofyouridentity


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A group of Native Alaskan boarding school survivors tour what remains of the campus of the Carlisle Indian Industrial School in Pennsylvania. Carlisle was the first government run off-reservation Indian boarding school in America, and became the model for scores of similar institutions in the U.S. and Canada. This month marks the 100th anniversary since its closing. Roughly 12,000 students attended in the years it was open from 1879-1918, many of whom were taken from their communities and families by force. A cemetery on the grounds of what is now an Army facility contains the graves of 184 students who died while in attendance. #signsofyouridentity #carlisle #carlisleindianindustrialschool


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The simpler the words, the deeper the cut. #humbled #lessonsoflife #signsofyouridentity #lalaland


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This is Dawn Neptune Adams, a Penobscot woman who spent about 16 of her first 18 years in foster care in the state of Maine. One of her earliest memories of the foster home where she spent most of her childhood was having her foster mother violently brush her teeth with soap when she spoke a few words of Penobscot. “People often ask what reconciliation looks like to me,” Dawn said. “But there can be no reconciliation as long as the behavior continues. Our children are still being placed in non-Native foster homes. And it’s a washing away of our identity.” #signsofyouridentity #maine #penobscot


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Inside one of the few structures that remain of the Fort Hall Indian School, which operated from 1904-1935 for Shoshone-Bannock children on the Fort Hall Reservation in Idaho. The buildings were later used to house German prisoners of war during WW2, and most of the campus was demolished in the 60s. #signsofyouridentity


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Mt. Alyeska. #signsofyouridentity


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Another odd constant I find myself photographing on the road for #signsofyouridentity is street signs (ever since coming across Indian School Road in Albuquerque, NM). They’re ubiquitous, oddly forgettable, and consequentially slow to catch up with the tide of changing town names, school names, mascot names, etc. So in some ways, I view them as a window into the past.


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Mike Pinay, Qu’Appelle, “Indian Residential School,” 1953–1963
Beginning in the 1870s, the Canadian government operated a network of “Indian Residential Schools” that, for the sake of forced assimilation, separated indigenous children from their parents. Government-hired agents would take children from their homes and send them to Christian boarding schools, where, often, they would be abused—or even subjected to medical experiments. Although the most horrific practices were stopped earlier, it took until 1996 for the last of these schools to be closed. It wasn’t until 2008 that the Canadian government issued a formal apology.
In her Signs of Your Identity series, which is being supported by a grant from the Open Society Foundations, Daniella Zalcman (@dzalcman) highlights the experiences of survivors of the indigenous residential school system in Canada.
To learn more about Zalcman’s work, please check out our latest Stories or see the link in our bio.
#signsofyouridentity @signsofyouridentity #pulitzercenter #firstnations #canada


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Speaking of Chilocco, just came across this amazing 1909 image of the Chilocco Indian Industrial School’s basketball team. (That symbol — which was likely [EDIT: let’s say “possibly” instead] appropriated from Native American culture by Nazi Germany around 1920 — was used in several Indigenous North American societies to represent well-being, peace, the four directions, or the four seasons.) #signsofyouridentity


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From going through Elena (Nelson) Rothschild’s old boarding school artifacts and memorabilia last week... #signsofyouridentity


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Goodbye, Alaska, for now. Next up for @signsofyouridentity: Maine! #signsofyouridentity


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I will never stop being surprised by the intense trust and generosity of complete strangers who let me into their homes, lives, memories. Thank you, to everyone I met in Alaska, for sharing with me.
#signsofyouridentity @signsofyouridentity


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My first stop on pretty much every @signsofyouridentity trip is the local library — the best place for quick immersion in regional history. But also important to remember who was writing these books, for whom, and why. #signsofyouridentity


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There are plenty of threads that connect the experiences of Indigenous people impacted by boarding schools and other assimilation policies. Many of them are tangible: loss of language, disconnect from family. But one thing that I hear every now and then — mostly from those who grew up in remote communities on unceded or tribal land — is the unsettling sensation of being transported to foreign landscapes. In Australia, members of the Stolen Generation described the confusion of being taken from the desert to the tropics, or vice versa. Missing greenery, or being scared of the ocean. In Alaska, children from tundra villages encountered trees and mountains for the first time when they were sent to schools in the southeast. Sometimes I’ve heard it described as terror (imagine that this is the 1950s and you’ve never left home before or been exposed to imagery of other places), but more often as a pang of homesickness, or some kind of indescribable loss.
#signsofyouridentity @signsofyouridentity


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