AfricanParksNetwork@africanparksnetwork

African Parks is a conservation NGO that manages National Parks & Protected Areas on behalf of governments across Africa to benefit wildlife & people

www.wysscampaign.org/news/2018year-in-review

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AfricanParksNetwork

Watch now: Rare sighting of Akagera's newest lion cubs! We are excited to welcome in the new year with video footage of Akagera National Park's newest cubs in Rwanda. Lions were reintroduced to the park in 2015 after almost a 20-year absence, and the population has since tripled with now more than 20 lions in the park. Prior to assuming management of Akagera in 2010, in partnership with the Rwandan Government, the park's wildlife had drastically declined as a result of poaching, overgrazing and the unsustainable harvesting of natural resources. Our rangers were able to address these threats head-on and work with local communities to restore safety to the park. Poaching is at an all-time low; wildlife populations are on the rise (including rhino and lion!); and communities are benefiting from the park's existence. We look forward to sharing more good news stories like these, from Akagera and the other parks we manage, with you in 2019. @heinmyers #africanparks #wildlife #akagera #rwanda #bigcats #predators #africanparksnetwork #communities #goodnews #hope #lions


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AfricanParksNetwork

Fundamental to African Parks' existence is the belief that national parks, the ecosystem services that they generate and the biodiversity that they conserve are necessary for the well-being of humanity and therefore are worth conserving. A well-managed park can support community development in addition to contributing to the national economy and providing globally essential ecosystem services. And in order for people to value a park, they must benefit from its existence. @liwonde_national_park in Malawi has 900,000 people living adjacent to the park's boundary. The park faced serious challenges before African Parks assuming management of it in 2015 - natural resources were being harvested at an unsustainable rate, human-wildlife conflict was rampant, thousands of deadly wire snares lay in wait in the park, and key species like lion and cheetah had been extirpated. When we assumed management, we immediately built a perimeter fence around the park to reduce human-wildlife conflict by keeping wildlife in the park, and illegal activities out. We employed and trained rangers from the community who have since removed more than 31,000 wire snares and significantly reduced poaching. With safety restored, we were able to return lions and cheetahs, stimulate tourism and generate critical park revenue which is reinvested into community projects. These extraordinary results would not have been possible without the support of the communities who are our key partners in the work that we do in Liwonde, and all the parks we manage. Only with them, do these wild landscapes stand a fighting chance. Photo: @plukmedia #africanparks #malawi #liwonde #communities #wildlife #restoration #forcefoodgood


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AfricanParksNetwork

In 2018 the Wyss Foundation through their #CampaignForNature partnered with us and other organisations and local communities, to drastically accelerate the pace of conservation and prevent the current demise of wildlife. In 2018 alone, the have helped protect 12.2 million acres of land and 842,000 km2 of ocean – in their first step in the newly-launched Wyss Campaign for Nature, an extraordinary $1 billion, 10-year commitment made by philanthropist and founder Mr. Hansjörg Wyss. As Mr. Wyss, Chairman of the Wyss Foundation and African Parks' Board Member, explained when launching the Wyss Campaign for Nature, “Every one of us – citizens, philanthropists, business and government leaders – should be troubled by the enormous gap between how little of our natural world is currently protected and how much should be protected. It is a gap that we must urgently narrow, before our human footprint consumes the earth’s remaining wild places.” While the global community is expected to meet the nearly decade-old targets by the 2020 deadline, scientists and NGOs are in agreement that the current pace of land and ocean conservation, and the resources available, are insufficient to address the scale of the problem, which includes: levels of wildlife extinction not seen in human history; pollution in drinking water and irrigation supplies; and continued loss of wilderness to sprawl and deforestation. Thanks to critical support from the Wyss #CampaignForNature our collective aim is to meet these threats head-on and ensure a brighter future for both wildlife and people. Be inspired and read the Foundation’s notable success stories from 2018 by clicking the link in our bio.
📷 @mana_meadows
#WyssFoundation #campaignfornature #Africanparks #conservation #hope


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AfricanParksNetwork

African elephants are iconic species threatened by ivory poaching and populations are declining in various parts of Africa - with fewer than 350,000 African elephants remaining across the continent according to @savetheelephants. It is now recognised at the highest levels that a range of urgent conservation actions at national and international actions are necessary to combat this illegal trade, including the engagement of local communities at source sites as well as effective law enforcement across the chain of trade and demand. DRC's @garamba_national_park is an excellent example of what is possible when governments and local communities work together. Garamba is situated in one of the most hostile parts of Africa and has systematically been targeted for its natural resources over the last few decades to fund militarised poachers' campaigns of terror and instability. However, since the complete overhaul of our law enforcement strategy in 2016 and our continuous engagement with communities who live adjacent to the park, we are finally gaining ground. For the first time in years, elephant poaching has declined dramatically, as we lost just two elephants to poaching in 2018; surveys are showing a significant reduction of illegal activity in the park, and key wildlife populations including giraffe and hartebeest have either stabilised or are increasing. In a region with little opportunity, Garamba is providing hope for tens of thousands of people living around the park, and peace is slowly returning to this corner of the world again. Photo: David Santiago Garcia #africanparks #garamba #drc #elephants #worthmorealive #forceforgood


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AfricanParksNetwork

Did you know that @zakouma_national_park in Chad is home to 50% of the world's population of Kordofan Giraffe? Fewer than 2,000 of these iconic giants (and their own subspecies)
remain across their range, which includes southern Chad, the Central African Republic, northern Cameroon, and the northern Democratic Republic of Congo. Sadly, @garamba_national_park, in the north-eastern DRC, is protecting the last remaining population of Kordofan giraffe in the DRC with just 48 individuals left. The decline of the species has been driven by insecurity, armed conflict and relentless poaching – as they are targeted for their meat and skin, but also just
for their tails which are sold as dowries. Thanks to our Rangers who have been protecting the last of their kind in Garamba, the population has been stabilized and is on the road to recovery. Meanwhile, Zakouma has become a sanctuary for biodiversity that not only provides a refuge for the largest surviving Kordofan giraffe population in the region but for all wildlife who reside with the park. In spite of the Kordofan giraffe population being eliminated from substantial parts of its former range, due to improved management under African Parks in Zakouma and Garamba, numbers are stable and on the rise, and the future for the species is brighter than before. Photo: Michael Viljoen #africanparks #wildlife #giraffe #kordofan #zakouma #chad #garamba #drc #forceforgood


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AfricanParksNetwork

Malawi is often referred to as “The Warm Heart of Africa” and once you step foot in this beautiful and hospitable country, you will immediately understand why. For those in search of the Big Five, you will not have to look far, as Malawi has them all. National parks such as @liwonde_national_park and Majete Wildlife Reserve offer visitors the opportunity to catch a glimpse of rhinos, lions, and other iconic species during day time game drives, beautiful sunset drives and blissful river cruises, even night spotting offers a unique vantage point. Other parks to be on the lookout for are Nkhotakota Wildlife Reserve (home of the historic 500 Elephant translocation) and the Mangochi Forest Reserve (which adjoins Liwonde) - all four of these parks are being restored to their former glory thanks to African Parks and the Malawian Government, and have a range of accommodations from camp sites to luxury. From the floodplains of Liwonde National Park, where lions and cheetahs have been restored to the park for the first time in decades, to the banks of the Shire River in Majete Wildlife Reserve, where more than 2,500 animals were reintroduced to the reserve making Majete a 'Big Five' reserve - Malawi is in the throes of an inspiring renaissance and is fast becoming renowned as an exciting safari destination. If you would like to learn more about how you can visit these parks, and help contribute to conservation and to local communities, please click the link in our bio. Photo @frankweitzer
#africanparks #conservation #wildlife #majete #liwonde #nkhotakota #mangochi #malawi #tourism #bucketlist2019


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AfricanParksNetwork

Akagera National Park in Rwanda has been named as one of @cntraveler's "The Best Trips We Took in 2018". Throughout the year, the Traveler team flew around the world visiting extraordinary places, @akagerapark was one of the trips that stayed with them long after they returned home. Akagera is Central Africa’s largest protected wetland and the last remaining refuge for savannah-adapted species in Rwanda. Only a couple of hours' drive from Kigali, it has been fully rewilded due to the partnership between African Parks and the Government of Rwanda - and now contains the Big 5 (including rhinos and lions which we brought back in the last two years). In May, Akagera will also have its first five-star luxury tented lodging, Magashi Camp, from @WildernessSafaris. But all visitors are welcome as there is a range of accommodation facilities including a campsite, Ruzizi Tented Lodge and Karenge Bush Camp. Proceeds from tourism revenue are invested back into the park and the local community, which over the years has made this park more than 75% self-sustaining. This is why visiting the parks is one of the best ways to support conservation, communities, and the long-term future of these wild areas. Click the link in our bio to read the full list of @cntraveler's "The Best Trips We Took in 2018". Photo: @johndickens.boz
#AfricanParks #conservation #wildlife #Akagera #Rwanda #tourism #bucketlist2019


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AfricanParksNetwork

One of the world's oddest birds, the aptly named shoebill, has found sanctuary in Zambia's Bangweulu Wetlands. Bangweulu, which means “where water meets the sky”, spans 6,000 km2 of north-eastern Zambia. Its beguiling wetlands are a designated Ramsar site and a designated ‘Important Bird Area’ by Birdlife with 433 avian species recorded in its seasonally inundated swamps and grasslands. Bangweulu is also one of the best places in Africa to spot one of the world’s most sought-after prizes: this rare and prehistoric-looking shoebill. Even with a myriad of avian stars, including wattled cranes, swamp flycatchers and blue-breasted bee-eaters, it is the shoebill that steals the show. So much so that the park's newest safari camp is an ode to the bird as it has been appropriately named "Shoebill Island Camp". Guests can book their place to see this charismatic giant, along with countless other bird and game species, in this unique and probably one of the most important wetlands in all of Africa, by clicking the link in our bio. By visiting the park, you can contribute to its long-term sustainability because funding goes back to help protect the landscape and supports local communities. Tourist lodges and camps create further opportunities for employment and training, for 50,000 people who legally live within this wetland. The more people that are involved in supplying goods and services to tourism facilities in the park, the more the local economy is fed, and communities can have a real stake in the long-term success of the park.Photo: @morgan_trimble #Conservation #Wildlife #Tourism #Bangweulu #Zambia #Shoebill #Birds #Wetlands


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AfricanParksNetwork

@zakouma_national_park in Chad is one of the most surprising safari destinations in Africa. With an elephant herd surpassing 560 individuals last year, this wildlife haven is fast emerging as one of the most exceptional wildlife experiences, with @bloombergbusiness just reporting it as a top place to visit in 2019. Visitors can experience a spectacular savannah landscape full of iconic African wildlife - lions, elephants, giraffe, leopard, and herds of game species; and thousands of water birds can be seen dancing on top of the many water pans that are scattered across the park. This is a far cry from the devastation the park experienced a few years ago when the park’s elephant population plummeted by 90% as a result of poaching – in 2010, only 450 elephants remained, down from 4,000 just eight years prior. However, since African Parks assumed management in 2010 in partnership with the Chadian Government, safety has been restored and wildlife and people are thriving. Schools have been built, thousands of children are getting an education, the park is the largest employer in the region and tourism is flourishing helping to create a conservation-led economy. The abundance of wildlife in this now secure park is astounding. And with this renewed hope, international and local visitors travel to witness this story of revival first hand. Accommodations are available for all budgets – from basic Camp Salamat, mid-level at Camp Tinga, and luxury level with Camp Nomade. Please click the link in our bio to learn more about how to book your visit!


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AfricanParksNetwork

@liuwaplainnationalpark in Zambia is one of Africa's most underhyped yet rewarding national parks. It offers an exciting wildlife experience for visitors who are feeling intrepid. Since African Parks assumed management in 2003, in partnership with the DNPW, wildlife has thrived: we’ve successfully relocated eland, lion and buffalo to the park and the blue wildebeest population has since tripled - a testament to good park management allowing the ecosystem to recover. We also reintroduced lions; cheetah are breeding and the hyena’s have surpassed 500! Unknown to many, the park hosts the second largest wildebeest migration in Africa. Visitors to the park will find that the plains of Liuwa are never silent, the wind is always rustling through the grass, and you often catch the sound of a wattled crane calling to its mate. In such tranquil solitude, it’s easy to forget that there are people here too, albeit sparsely dispersed. The Lozi have lived on the Liuwa Plain longer than anyone can recall: their own tradition says they have been here since time began. It’s their home, and they depend on these lands and waters for their livelihoods. We are working together with our partners at the DNPW, the Barotse Royal Establishment and @timeandtideafrica to ensure that people and wildlife thrive in this shared and extraordinary landscape. To read the full article from @travelafrica (page 82-83), please click the link in our bio. Photo: Heinrich van den Berg #africanparks #conservation #zambia #wildlife #communities


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AfricanParksNetwork

Watch: African Parks is a conservation NGO that was founded in 2000 as an African solution to show how to effectively manage the continent's protected areas. Today, with 15 parks under management in nine countries, we are conserving the largest area for any one NGO in Africa and are doing this for the benefit of people and wildlife. This is our story - and we hope you’re inspired by the good news that is happening all around us, because it’s in large part thanks to you.
#africanparks #wildlife #forceforgood


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AfricanParksNetwork

Did you know that Pendjari National Park in Benin is one of the largest remaining strongholds for elephants and lions in West Africa? The park, which spans 4,800 km2, is becoming a safe haven for iconic species thanks to improved law enforcement and stability in the region. Pendjari’s expansive landscape contains important wetlands which are critical for many local species including cheetahs, buffalo, various antelope species, more than 460 avian species and the critically endangered West African lion, of which fewer than 400 adults remain, and 100 live in Pendjari. Historically the park has faced major threats, including poaching, demographic pressure on surrounding land, and exponential resource use. But the Benin Government wanted to change this trajectory and chart a different path for this critically important landscape, with the aim of providing better protection for the people and wildlife who live there. By partnering with African Parks, a lifeline was thrown to this little-known but globally important protected area. Find out what we are doing to secure the reserve by clicking the link in our bio.
#africanparks #conservation #wildlife #bigcats
Photo: @jonas_vandevoorde


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