AfricanParksNetwork@africanparksnetwork

African Parks is a conservation NGO that manages National Parks & Protected Areas on behalf of governments across Africa to benefit wildlife & people

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AfricanParksNetwork

A young elephant calf plays under the watchful eye of its mother at Majete Wildlife Reserve in Malawi. Over just 15 years, Majete has transformed from a once-empty forest with no employment or tourism and only a few remaining antelope, to a productive and flourishing haven for Africa's most iconic wildlife, generating revenue and benefits for local communities. Decades of lawlessness and poaching had seen the reserve’s wildlife almost entirely eradicated by the 1990s – elephants, rhinos, lions, leopards, buffalo and many other species had all been hunted out completely. But, effective park management began and safety was re-established in 2003 when African Parks assumed management of Majete in partnership with the DNPW. Our Rangers secured the park and its remaining wildlife, and then we set in motion a series of wildlife reintroductions that included iconic species such as elephant, rhino and lions – and included a total of 2,900 animals from 14 different species. 200 elephants were brought back to the park between 2006 and 2009 and since their reintroduction, the population has more than doubled, and not one elephant has been lost to poaching thanks to incredible efforts of our rangers and strong community engagement. These elephants grew to over 400 and last year, helped make up the 500 Elephant translation we undertook, moving individuals from Majete and @liwonde_national_park to help repopulate Nkhotakota – a larger and safe park also in Malawi. As a result of our efforts, elephant calves like this are thriving in Majete along with other wildlife, fostering in a new generation of all things wild. 🎥 @wesley_hartmann #africanparks #majete #malawi #elephant #calf #wildlife @animalsdoingthings


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AfricanParksNetwork

Worrying news as IUCN reports several of Africa's iconic giraffe subspecies are in serious trouble. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species has drawn attention to the plight of the giraffe, revealing that they are in decline. Two giraffe subspecies are now listed as ‘Critically Endangered’ (Kordofan and Nubian giraffe) and one has been listed as ‘Endangered’ (Reticulated giraffe), while others range from ‘Vulnerable’ (Thornicroft’s and West African giraffe) to ‘Near Threatened’ (Rothschild’s giraffe). “While giraffe are commonly seen on safari, in the media, and in zoos, people are unaware that these majestic animals are undergoing a silent extinction,” – says Dr Julian Fennessy, Director of @giraffe_conservation (GCF) and a partner of African Parks. In spite of this, there is also positive news as we have recently recorded an increase in Kordofan giraffe in @zakouma_national_park in Chad, which African Parks has been managing since 2010. Zakouma is home to 50% of the global population of this Critically Endangered subspecies, and effective law enforcement has provided them, and other key species, with the safety they need to breed and thrive. To learn more please click the link in our bio. Photo: Michael Viljoen #africanparks #africanparksnetwork #wildlife #chad #zakouma #endangered #iucn #giraffe


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AfricanParksNetwork

"We can all make a difference. Just believe in yourself and get started" - Dr. Pete Morkel, winner of the @tusk_org Prince William Award for Conservation in Africa, 2018. We are delighted to share that Dr. Pete Morkel, a wildlife veterinarian and long-time friend and colleague of African Parks, has been awarded a lifetime achievement award for his tireless work to save wildlife and wild places across Africa. We have had the privilege of working with Dr. Morkel throughout his career, which spans more than three decades, and he has been instrumental in many of our own wildlife translocations and monitoring programmes for elephants, rhinos and lions across the continent. Pete is considered one of the world’s foremost experts on rhino conservation and management in the wild. He is the go-to person for wildlife capture in some of Africa’s most rugged and difficult environments. Throughout this career, Pete has shown often put his own personal safety last, and has spent many months at a time away from his family dedicating his entire energy and attention to the conservation and welfare of Africa’s wildlife. We thank him and his family for his unrelenting dedication to save Africa's wildlife, his passion for educating future conservationists and for allowing us to be part of his extraordinary journey.
Congratulations Dr. Morkel for this award – it is truly well deserved! 🎥 @tusk_org #africanparks #Repost @tusk_org with @get_repost
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CONGRATULATIONS Dr Pete Morkel on being the Winner of the Prince William Award for Conservation in Africa, 2018!
Dr Pete Morkel has been key to myriad African conservation initiatives for over 35 years. His unsurpassed skills in game capture, wildlife translocations andre-introductions have had a signi cantimpact on wildlife management and conservation across the continent.
Pete is considered one of the world’s foremost experts on rhino conservation and management in the wild. It is here that he has made his greatest contributions being key to the translocation and management of many populations across the continent.
Thank you Pete for all the incredible work you have done to ensure our wildlife is around for future generations!


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AfricanParksNetwork

JOIN US: To all our friends in New York, come and experience the story of African Parks first hand at the ‘Sketch for Survival’ exhibition taking place at The Explorers Club this Wednesday, November 14. Our Chief Marketing Officer, Andrea Heydlauff, will be sharing the extraordinary story of Garamba National Park in the DRC; one of Africa’s oldest national parks and a World Heritage Site, that is the last stronghold for the largest population of elephants and the last remaining Kordofan giraffe in the DRC. For over 15 years, Andrea has written and co-authored numerous scientific and popular publications on conservation, has spoken widely at conferences and is an award-winning filmmaker; and has focused on human dimensions, community engagement, education, media and creative storytelling. Join Andrea as she explains how we plan to save the endangered species that call Garamba National Park home. We would love to meet and connect with our supporters in New York, so we hope to see you there! Please click the link in our bio to secure your place at the event as space is limited. Photo: @lifethroughalensphotography #africanparks #africanparksnetwork #garamba #congo #sketchforsurvival #wildlife #elephants #giraffe #worldheritage #drc @aheydlauff #newyork #usa #storytelling @the_explorers_club @realafrica @garamba_national_park


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AfricanParksNetwork

News outlets are reporting today, that China has postponed the lifting of the ban on the trade of tiger and rhino parts for medicinal and other uses. Over a week ago it was announced that China would allow trading in products made from farmed tigers and rhinos under "special circumstances", reversing a previous ban that was established in 1993 amid a global push to protect fast-disappearing endangered species. There was concern that overturning the ban could make it easier for poachers and smugglers who are dealing in the illegal trade, to hide behind a legalised one. However, China announced today that lifting the ban has now been postponed, further reiterating that the old bans would continue to be enforced and that Illegal acts will be dealt with severely. To read the full article, please click the link in our bio. 🥄 @liwonde_national_park #Worthmorealive #rhino #illegalwildlifetrade #wildlife #conservation #africanparks #wildlifeconservation #wildlifecrime #wildlifetrade #endangeredspecies


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AfricanParksNetwork

Meet our Shoebill Guardians: local fisherman from Bangweulu Wetlands who are the protectors of the park’s rare and wonderfully prehistoric-looking shoebill storks. Bangweulu Wetlands in northeast Zambia are filled with shimmering lagoons and an intricate network of tranquil waterways. Tucked deep away in a maze of islands, you’ll find one of the park’s most iconic species - the shoebill. Shoebills, named for their massive bills that look almost clog-like, are quirky giant storks that are endemic to Africa and live only in remote marshy places. The IUCN classify the birds as vulnerable to extinction, as they survive in only a handful of countries. Bangweulu is home to 100-or-so Shoebills, making this Africa’s second-most important population. Demand from poachers for their eggs and chicks – which can fetch up to $10,000 - is placing considerable pressure on a diminishing wild population. However, in Bangweulu, dedicated locals have banded together to protect the birds and their nests to stop the trade at the source, and are known as “Shoebill Guards ”. These fishermen track and monitor the park’s shoebill nests to see if eggs have been laid and to keep watch for signs of human disturbance. And their vigilance is paying off. Since 2012 when we first began the program, 25 chicks successfully fledged from 21 guarded nests. Six chicks that were stolen from nests have also been rescued from captivity and rehabilitated, and released back into the wild. This success has led African Parks to expand the program from an initial nine guards hired in 2012 to 12 today; and over the next few years, we aim to hire a team of 20 guards to cover the 2,317 square miles of wetlands. And it’s not just shoebills that local people are helping to protect; these communities play a critical role in all the conservation work carried out at Bangweulu. Their futures are entwined, dependent on the birds’ survival in this incredible landscape where water meets the sky. If you would like to thank these incredible communities, please leave a message in the comments below – or show your support for their work by donating via the link in our bio. Photo: @morgan_trimble #africanparks #wildlife


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AfricanParksNetwork

“Sketch for Survival” is helping bring working dogs to Garamba National Park’s in the DRC. Garamba is one of Africa's oldest and ecologically significant parks that sadly has also been one of the hardest hit by elephant poaching. Once home to over 22,000 elephants in the 70’s, today only around 1,200 remain. But, our revised law enforcement strategy enacted in 2016 has already seen a reduction of elephants poached by 50% in 2017, and in 2018 only two known elephants have been killed. A canine unit will help better equip Garamba’s teams to address the threats they are facing more effectively and provide needed protection to all the wildlife living in the park. Sketch for Survival is a fundraising initiative, made possible by Explorers against Extinction, that aims to raise awareness about the plight of poaching, and they have asked celebrities and artists to spend 26 minutes on a sketch of an endangered species for their touring exhibition. The 2018 Sketch for Survival collection has over four hundred artworks from artists in more than thirty different countries. A portion of the profits from the online auction of artwork will go to support our conservation work in Garamba and help in funding a needed K9 unit for the park. To learn more about this initiative, the artists sketching a future for Garamba’s elephants, and how you can help, please visit the link in our bio. 📷 @lifethroughalensphotography #africanparks #garamba #drc #wildlife #sketchforsurvival #giraffe #consevation


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AfricanParksNetwork

One of the first cheetahs to be reintroduced to @liwonde_national_park in Malawi has been successfully fitted with a tracking collar. Known as CM2, this seven year old male was one of four cheetahs who were reintroduced to Liwonde in May 2017, after a 100-year absence in the park, and a 20-year absence in the country. Since their reintroduction last year, the population has since tripled! An experienced team of conservation experts and wildlife vets safely darted this male in order to fit the collar which will allow us to track his movements via satellite. Through collaring individual animals, important detailed information can be gathered such as home range sizes, habitat use and preferences, spatial movements compared to other predators and also associations among the existing cheetah population, and overall survival. Within an hour of being darted he was back on his feet, exploring the flood plains of the park. With the reintroduction of lions to Liwonde earlier this year, Liwonde is quickly emerging as a bright spot for big cat conservation and for tourism in Malawi, thanks to support from our partners including the Malawi Government, the Dutch Government, @endangeredwildlifetrust , @lionrecovery and the @leonardodicapriofdn


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AfricanParksNetwork

Regrettably, we have further bad news to report from Chad. An additional two black rhino carcasses were discovered in Zakouma National Park this week, bringing the total mortalities to four, of the six that were reintroduced in May this year. We can confirm that none of these rhinos were poached and we are taking all actions to determine what may have resulted in their deaths. On the advice of a team of veterinarians experienced in working with black rhinos, the remaining two animals are being recaptured and placed in holding facilities in order to facilitate closer management; and a SANParks veterinarian was dispatched to Zakouma National Park to assist with the process, and one rhino has already been recaptured and is doing well in their enclosure. Post-mortems have been conducted and various samples of blood, tissue and fecal matter were sent to specialist pathology laboratories in South Africa. Histopathological results so far have indicated that infectious diseases or plant toxicity are not the cause of death. Serological evidence has however indicated exposure to trypanosomes, a blood borne parasite transmitted by tsetse flies, but at this stage this is not suspected to be the cause of the mortalities. Low fat reserves do suggest however that maladaptation by the rhinos to their new environment is the likely underlying cause, although tests to be undertaken on brain and spinal fluid may shed additional light on the exact cause of deaths. Collaboration among the Governments of the Republic of South Africa and the Republic of Chad, including SANParks and African Parks remains active as efforts continue to be made to establish clarity around the exact cause of deaths of the four rhinos, and to safeguard the remaining two animals. Please see the link in our bio for the full, joint statement.


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AfricanParksNetwork

Liuwa’s vast open plains are home to the second largest wildebeest migration in Africa. With over 40,000 wildebeest, a plethora of water birds, and apex predators including hyenas, cheetahs, and @liuwaplainnationalpark’s famous lions, Liuwa offers an unparalleled sense of space and wilderness, that epitomises wild Africa. Liuwa’s wildlife also shares this landscape with over 15,000 community members who live inside the park and who are the custodians of the reserve and its wildlife. Liuwa has emerged as a popular tourism destination as visitors can witness spectacular wildlife, without the crowds, and as a result it has recently been selected as one of the top 52 destinations to visit in 2018 by the @nytimes, and the King Lewanika Lodge made Travel + Leisure’s hotel “It List” for 2018. Tourism is an essential component in the long-term management of national parks as it creates tangible economic benefits for the local communities who live there, and helps sustain the park’s conservation efforts. Find out more about visiting this extraordinary park by clicking the link in our bio. Photo: @willbl #africanparks #wildlife #africanparksnetwork #zambia #liuwa #wildebeest #migration #bucketlist #travel


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AfricanParksNetwork

Big cat sighting: An inquisitive leopard was recently caught on camera in @akagerapark in Rwanda. Did you know that since African Parks assumed management of Akagera, in partnership with the Rwanda Development Board in 2010, large mammal numbers have increased from 4,000 to over 13,500? Here are five more inspiring things you may not know about Akagera since African Parks assumed management of the park:
1. Visitor numbers have increased from 12,000 a year to 36,000 – half of which are Rwandan nationals
2. Over 5,000 school children visit the park each year
3. A single community cooperative earns over $100,000 per year from providing guiding services to tourists
4. Full time employment levels have increased from 18 people in 2010 to 230 today
5. Park income has risen ten-fold from $200,000 in 2010, and this year we anticipate breaking the $2 million mark!
These are the results African Parks can achieve when we take on the direct responsibility for the long-term management of national parks and protected areas in partnership with government and communities. The benefits of well-managed protected areas go well beyond wildlife with direct links to mitigating climate change, creating sustainable development and providing improved security for both people and wildlife. If you would like to make a donation to support parks like Akagera and our efforts to protect these areas for people and wildlife alike, please click the link in our bio. 🎥 @drewbantlin #africanparksnetwork #africanparks #bigcats #wildlife #leopard #conservation #akageranationalpark #akagera #rwanda


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AfricanParksNetwork

In an unprecedented move, the Wyss Campaign for Nature has committed $1 billion to help protect 30% of the planet by 2030! “I will give this sum over the next decade to help accelerate land and ocean conservation around the world,” said Mr Hansjörg Wyss, philanthropist and Board Member of African Parks, in his New York Times OpEd published yesterday. With plant and animal species disappearing at a rate 1,000 times faster than they were before humans arrived on the scene, this momentous commitment offers the planet a much-needed lifeline – and hopefully inspired others to follow. Mr Wyss continued, “For the sake of all living things, let’s see to it that far more of our planet is protected by the people, for the people and for all time”. Thank you Mr Hansjörg Wyss and Wyss Campaign for your extraordinary commitment to nature, and to humanity. Read the full OpEd by clicking the link in our bio. #AfricanParks #WyssCampaign #Nature #wildlife #forceforgood #campaignfornature


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