Bertie Gregory@bertiegregory

24y/o Wildlife filmmaker and host of Nat Geo's 'Wild_Life'. Previously Jaguars and Leopards for Nat Geo with Steve Winter then BBC NHU camera bursary.

https://youtu.be/S_zD4N2NqWQ

352 posts 311,369 followers 703 following

A really really bad day to be a caiman... Part of a new jaguar show shot with @stevewinterphoto premiering tonight on @natgeowild in the US (other territories coming soon!). Huge thanks to the awesome team @natgeo !!! Shot on @reddigitalcinema with @pantanalsafaris


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A big male jaguar takes a drink at sunset. During the dry season in Brazil's Pantanal, the jaguars stick close to the rivers. Not only do these rivers provide drinking water, they also concentrate the jaguar's primary prey- capybara and caiman. As a result, the best way to observe them is by boat. This gives an added benefit for filming as you can use the boat as a giant camera slider to create movement in the shot. Using a gyrostabilised rig and an electric motor, my boatman and I were able to smoothly (and almost silently) glide past giving the shot this rotation. Shot for a new jaguar show on @natgeowild premiering December 10th in the US (other territories coming soon). Also check out @stevewinterphoto 's jaguar story in this month's issue of National Geographic Magazine. Shot on @reddigitalcinema with @pantanalsafaris.


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A female jaguar bolting after a capybara in the northern Pantanal, Brazil. This whole chase lasted less than 5 seconds but by shooting at 100 frames per second, it allowed us to see this jaguar's epic agility and laser focus throughout the hunt. Unfortunately she ended this hunt empty handed! Shot for a new jaguar show on @natgeowild premiering December 10th in the US (other territories coming soon). Also check out @stevewinterphoto 's jaguar story in this month's issue of National Geographic Magazine. Shot on @reddigitalcinema with @pantanalsafaris


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An adult giant otter munching on a tasty catfish in the northern Pantanal, Brazil. Adults needs to eat about 2kg/4lbs of fish every single day. This individual was well on the way to its target! This species lives in family groups of up to 20 individuals so needs incredibly healthy ecosystems to support it. As a result, giant otters are a great indicator species. Shot for a new jaguar show on @natgeowild premiering December 10th in the US (other territories coming soon). Also check out @stevewinterphoto 's jaguar story in this month's issue of National Geographic Magazine. Shot on @reddigitalcinema with @pantanalsafaris


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This image of a howler monkey walking past newly discovered ancient paintings is part of @stevewinterphoto 's jaguar story in this month's issue of @natgeo magazine. Here's how Steve got the shot! The biggest painting at the top of this panel is a jaguar, identified by its open mouth. Carlos Castaño Uribe, our expedition leader and the man who discovered the first paintings in Chiribiquete National Park, has found that of all the animal depictions, only the jaguars have open mouths. Dating these paintings is difficult as the paint itself doesn't contain any carbon (it's an iron oxide based paint). Instead, the archaeology team collects the remains of the fires (carbon containing) at the base of these painting walls. These fires were used to prepare the walls for painting so give a good indication of the age of the paintings themselves. The carbon dating results from a previous expedition by this group suggested the paintings could be up to 20,000 years old making them some of the earliest evidence of humans in the Amazon.

Shot on an expedition with @fundacion_herencia, an incredible group of people doing real 21st century exploration. It’s very humbling to know that there are still places on this planet we know almost nothing about. But despite it’s remoteness, it is still under threat. It’s so vital that we find a way to protect Chiribiquete National Park, its pristine rainforest, these amazing paintings and the uncontacted people who live here.
We owe a huge thanks to Parks Colombia and the Colombian Ministry of Culture for their support. For more on this place, read @stevewinterphoto 's jaguar story in this month's @natgeo Magazine. Also stayed tuned for our jaguar TV show for @natgeowild premiering in the US on December 10th.


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My mentor @stevewinterphoto has been a @natgeo photographer for over 20 years. During that time he's seen some amazing things. That's why watching his face light up literally every minute during our expedition into Chiribiquete National Park, really added another layer of significance as to how special this place is. Enjoy this short compilation of his reactions!! To be continued (you're not going to want to miss the next video!) This video is an extract from an expedition with @fundacion_herencia, an incredible group of people doing real 21st century exploration. It’s very humbling to know that there are still places on this planet we know almost nothing about. But despite it’s remoteness, it is still under threat. It’s so vital that we find a way to protect Chiribiquete National Park, its pristine rainforest, these amazing paintings and the uncontacted people who live here.
We owe a huge thanks to Parks Colombia and the Colombian Ministry of Culture for their support. For more on this place, read @stevewinterphoto 's jaguar story in this month's @natgeo Magazine. Also stayed tuned for our jaguar TV show for @natgeowild premiering in the US on December 10th.


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After @Alejosanchezsanchez 's epic climb, it was time to move on. This meant bolting over the side of the tepuis in the helicopter with the doors off! Despite having lived next to the enormous cliff face for 2 days, nothing quite prepared us for going over the edge at high speed. To be continued... This video is an extract from an expedition with @fundacion_herencia, an incredible group of people doing real 21st century exploration. It’s very humbling to know that there are still places on this planet we know almost nothing about. But despite it’s remoteness, it is still under threat. It’s so vital that we find a way to protect Chiribiquete National Park, its pristine rainforest, these amazing paintings and the uncontacted people who live here.
We owe a huge thanks to Parks Colombia and the Colombian Ministry of Culture for their support. For more on this place, read @stevewinterphoto 's jaguar story in this month's @natgeo Magazine. Also stayed tuned for our jaguar TV show for @natgeowild premiering in the US on December 10th.


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After @Alejosanchezsanchez made that huge decent and an incredible discovery, he now had one thing left to do- climb up of course! His reaction with his colleague @jota_arango was priceless. After giving him 10 minutes to recover (alright 15), we decided to change location which led to @stevewinterphoto getting an unbelievable shot which sits in this month's issue of @natgeo Magazine. Stay tuned for the story of this shot!

This video is an extract from an expedition with @fundacion_herencia, an incredible group of people doing real 21st century exploration. It’s very humbling to know that there are still places on this planet we know almost nothing about. But despite it’s remoteness, it is still under threat. It’s so vital that we find a way to protect Chiribiquete National Park, its pristine rainforest, these amazing paintings and the uncontacted people who live here.
We owe a huge thanks to Parks Colombia and the Colombian Ministry of Culture for their support. For more on this place, read @stevewinterphoto 's jaguar story in this month's @natgeo Magazine. Also stayed tuned for our jaguar TV show for @natgeowild premiering in the US on December 10th.


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Following yesterday's post. After we filmed the paintings from on top of the cliff with the drone, @alejosanchezsanchez and @jota_arango from @arriera.co prepared their ropes for a closer look. When Alejo reached the bottom, he discovered the panel was much bigger than we had thought stretching 150m long and 8m high. After seeing the paintings, he then had one mighty climb ahead of him- to be continued!
This video is an extract from an expedition with @fundacion_herencia, an incredible group of people doing real 21st century exploration. It’s very humbling to know that there are still places on this planet we know almost nothing about. But despite it’s remoteness, it is still under threat. It’s so vital that we find a way to protect Chiribiquete National Park, its pristine rainforest, these amazing paintings and the uncontacted people who live here.
We owe a huge thanks to Parks Colombia and the Colombian Ministry of Culture for their support. For more on this place, read @stevewinterphoto 's jaguar story in this month's @natgeo Magazine. Also stayed tuned for our jaguar TV show for @natgeowild premiering in the US on December 10th.


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As promised, here is the view from the drone as I flew down to find the ancient paintings. We couldn't believe our eyes. The biggest painting in the middle of this panel is a jaguar, identified by its open mouth. Carlos Castaño Uribe, our expedition leader and the man who discovered the first paintings in Chiribiquete National Park, has found that of all the animal depictions, only the jaguars have open mouths. As we studied the videos, I joked to @stevewinterphoto about repelling down the enormous cliff face to get a closer look. I say 'joked' as I assumed it was a ridiculous suggestion, it was at this moment that @alejosanchezsanchez and @jota_arango from @arriera.co started preparing their ropes! To be continued... This video is an extract from an expedition with Fundacion Herencia, an incredible group of people doing real 21st century exploration. It’s very humbling to know that there are still places on this planet we know almost nothing about. But despite it’s remoteness, it is still under threat.
We owe a huge thanks to Parks Colombia and the Colombian Ministry of Culture for their support. For more on this place, Stay tuned for @stevewinterphoto ‘s upcoming jaguar story for @natgeo Magazine. Also stayed tuned for our jaguar TV show for @natgeowild premiering in the US on December 10th.


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After landing on top of the tepuis, finding a spot to launch the drone proved harder than expected. The paintings were located right at the bottom of the cliff-face meaning we had to find a place where the cliff jutted out in order to look back and down at the cliff (otherwise the drone would lose signal). Fortunately our ropes guru Alejo Sanchez (@alejosanchezsanchez) used his knowledge and skills to find a route to a good vantage point. To be continued! This video is an extract from an expedition with Fundacion Herencia, an incredible group of people doing real 21st century exploration. It’s very humbling to know that there are still places on this planet we know almost nothing about. But despite it’s remoteness, it is still under threat.
We owe a huge thanks to Parks Colombia and the Colombian Ministry of Culture for their support. For more on this place, Stay tuned for @stevewinterphoto ‘s upcoming jaguar story for @natgeo Magazine. Also stayed tuned for our jaguar TV show for @natgeowild premiering in the US on December 10th. @arriera.co @jota_arango


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After spotting the paintings from the helicopter(see previous post), we landed above them and planned our next move (to be continued!). This short video diary is an extract from an expedition with Fundacion Herencia, a amazing group of people doing real 21st century exploration.

We owe a huge thanks to Parks Colombia and the Colombian Ministry of Culture for their support. For more on this place, Stay tuned for @stevewinterphoto ‘s upcoming jaguar story for @natgeo Magazine. Also stayed tuned for our jaguar TV show for @natgeowild premiering in the US on December 10th.


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A lot led up to Alejo Sanchez's massive cliff decent in my previous post. The day before we had been flying around a number of these unsurveyed tepuis-like mountains looking for evidence of ancient paintings. After an hour of flying with no luck, Jorge Arango suddenly yelled 'painting, painting'! This would be the first time humans had seen these ancient paintings since they were created. Not only was I lucky enough to share this moment with this incredible group of people from Fundacion Herencia who are doing real 21st century exploration, I also (luckily!) had the camera rolling to capture this spine tingling moment. After circling back around for a closer look, we landed above the paintings and planned our next move. To be continued!
We owe a huge thanks to Parks Colombia and the Colombian Ministry of Culture for their support. For more on this place, Stay tuned for @stevewinterphoto ‘s upcoming jaguar story for @natgeo Magazine. Also stayed tuned for our jaguar TV show for @natgeowild premiering in the US on December 10th.


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Extreme climber Alejo Sanchez descends down an enormous rock face deep in the heart of the unexplored Chiribiquete National Park, Colombia (turn sound on to hear him singing!). When he reached the bottom of this cliff, he made a remarkable discovery. He found a massive panel of ancient paintings featuring jaguars, people and more. This area is home to many of these paintings, representing some of the earliest evidence of humans in the Amazon. I shot this whilst accompanying a team from Fundacion Herencia, an incredible group of people doing real 21st century exploration. It’s very humbling to know that there are still places on this planet we know almost nothing about. But despite it’s remoteness, it is still under threat.
We owe a huge thanks to Parks Colombia and the Colombian Ministry of Culture for their support. For more on this place, Stay tuned for @stevewinterphoto ‘s upcoming jaguar story for @natgeo Magazine. Also stayed tuned for our jaguar TV show for @natgeowild premiering in the US on December 10th.


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Meet this awesome family and their house which has got to be in the runnings for coolest house of all time. I was lucky enough to hang out with this family for last two weeks as they fished on the river pictured. I’m now back home in Bristol and already missing their epic way of life. Shot for a new BBC series about the world’s city wildlife.


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Great to be back in Brazil, this time filming for ‘Wild Metropolis’, a new BBC series about the world’s city wildlife. We ended today with some nice drone filming. Thanks director @melville.m for the photo. #earthonlocation


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A helicopter carrying a team of archeologists and biologists deep into the heart of the unexplored Chiribiquete National Park. The team from Fundacion Herencia are doing real 21st century exploration. It’s very humbling to know that there are still places on this planet we know almost nothing about. This massive area boasts one of the largest protected areas of jaguar habitat in the world. It is also home to ancient paintings of jaguars, representing some of the earliest evidence of humans in South America. But despite its remoteness, it is still under threat.
We owe a huge thanks to Parks Colombia and the Colombian Ministry of Culture for their support. Stay tuned for @stevewinterphoto ‘s upcoming jaguar story for @natgeo Magazine and our TV show for @natgeowild.


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The dramatic landscape deep in the heart of the unexplored Chiribiquete National Park. This massive area boasts one of the largest protected areas of jaguar habitat in the world. It is also home to ancient paintings of jaguars, representing some of the earliest evidence of humans in South America. I shot this from a drone whilst accompanying a team from Fundacion Herencia, an incredible group of people doing real 21st century exploration. It’s very humbling to know that there are still places on this planet we know almost nothing about. But despite its remoteness, it is still under threat.
We owe a huge thanks to Parks Colombia and the Colombian Ministry of Culture for their support. Stay tuned for @stevewinterphoto ‘s upcoming jaguar story for @natgeo Magazine and our TV show for @natgeowild.


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A waterfall deep in the heart of the unexplored Chiribiquete National Park. I shot this from a helicopter whilst accompanying a team from Fundacion Herencia, an incredible group of people doing real 21st century exploration. It’s very humbling to know that there are still places on this planet we know almost nothing about. This massive area boasts one of the largest protected areas of jaguar habitat in the world. It is also home to ancient paintings of jaguars, representing some of the earliest evidence of humans in South America. But despite its remoteness, it is still under threat.
We owe a huge thanks to Parks Colombia and the Colombian Ministry of Culture for their support. Stay tuned for @stevewinterphoto ‘s upcoming jaguar story for @natgeo Magazine and our TV show for @natgeowild.


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I think I found nemo- a pair of Red Sea Anemone fish swim around their host anemone off the coast of Gubal Island in the North Red Sea. These fish and their anemone provide the textbook example of a symbiotic relationship- one in which two species benefit from each other. The fish benefit as the anemone provides a protective home. The anemone benefits as the fish clean parasites and scare away anemone eating fish. Nature, you just about nailed it.


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A massive school of anthias (the bright orange fish) feed in the water column over a coral reef in the Northern Red Sea. The diversity (the number of different species) of coral reefs is mind blowing. It is estimated that whilst they only occupy 1% of the ocean floor, they are home to more than 25% of the ocean's biodiversity! Coral reefs all around the world are in trouble but why should we care? Well, aside from just being awesome, they provide so many functions that are vital to human existence including coastline storm protection, fisheries production, tourism and climate regulation.


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Turn sound on! Moments before the video in my last post, this happened. My dive buddy and I had spent the best part of an hour trying to film a little fish called a lemon goby that lives in aptly named, stag-horn coral (pictured on the right). I wasn’t having much luck with these skittish little fish so sculled backwards to film my dive buddy in action. This was when a pair of bottlenose dolphins appeared out of the blue behind him. I had no way of telling my buddy there were dolphins just metres behind him as I had both hands on the camera trying to film this comical moment. I resorted to just shrieking into my regulator (the sound you can hear).


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A pair of bottlenose dolphins glide majestically through late afternoon sunrays. Dolphins have a great way of teasing you. They’ll buzz in out of nowhere, get you all excited, and then before you’re actually ready to photograph them, they’ll whizz off again into the blue. This encounter however, was one where they kindly and calmly cooperated! Shot in the Northern Red Sea with my pal @takeiteasyduxy.


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An octopus on the hunt at night in the northern Red Sea, Egypt. Here the octopus is net feeding where it spooks fish into little caves before ballooning with its 8 tentacles blocking all exits. Predators like this octopus are crucial to the functionality of coral reefs as they keep the number of grazing animals in check. If octopus are overfished and removed the reef, the number of grazers increases and the reef as a whole suffers. Long story short, ecosystems need predators. When you look after the predators, you look after everything underneath! Apologies for the rubbish lighting- I had been shooting stills (with strobes, not video lights) when I came across this octopus. I felt stills just didn’t do this behaviour justice so botched some horribly flat lighting with my dive torch. I know, excuses, excuses...


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After filming this epic storm roll in, the wind started to pick up so it was time to bring the drone home. I’m very glad we made that call at the right time because 20 seconds after landing we were in a howling gale and torrential rains! Coming to the end of a shoot here in Thailand, fingers crossed for last days luck! #cuttingitfine #butgottadronethestorm


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A baby bottlenose dolphin (a calf) comes over to check me out in waters off Gubal Island in the northern Red Sea. I was lucky enough to spend over an hour with this calf and it’s mother as they swam laps around me. It's incredible to think that bottlenose dolphins are capable of diving well over 250m deep.


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A bizarre looking Porites coral and a school of anthias (the bright orange fish). The diversity (the number of different species) of coral reefs is mind blowing. It is estimated that whilst they only occupy 1% of the ocean floor, they are home to more than 25% of the ocean's biodiversity! Coral reefs all around the world are in trouble but why should we care? Well, aside from just being awesome, they provide so many functions that are vital to human existence including coastline storm protection, fisheries production, tourism and climate regulation.


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Glassfish pulsating in a cave in the northern Red Sea, Egypt. The diversity (the number of different species) of coral reefs is mind blowing. It is estimated that whilst they only occupy 1% of the ocean floor, they are home to more than 25% of the ocean's biodiversity! Coral reefs all around the world are in trouble but why should we care? Well, aside from just being awesome, they provide so many functions that are vital to human existence including coastline storm protection, fisheries production, tourism and climate regulation.


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Behind the scenes from my last post of the lettuce coral shot by @takeiteasyduxy. Filming underwater is all about buoyancy. I’m certainly not claiming to have the best buoyancy but here you can see that by finely controlling my buoyancy I am able to get very close to my subject without touching it. Getting close underwater is key as reducing the amount of water between the subject and the camera dramatically increases the clarity of the shot. The no touching part is obviously critical so that both the marine life and other people can enjoy this view for years to come!


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A lettuce coral covered in anthias in the Northern Red Sea. The diversity (the number of different species) of coral reefs is mind blowing. It is estimated that whilst they only occupy 1% of the ocean floor, they are home to more than 25% of the ocean's biodiversity! Coral reefs all around the world are in trouble but why should we care? Well, aside from just being awesome, they provide so many functions that are vital to human existence including coastline storm protection, fisheries production, tourism and climate regulation.


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