Cara Santa Maria@cara_santa_maria

We can do so much better.

http://carasantamaria.com/

‪Spent the afternoon hanging with @annarothschild at the @smithsoniannmnh and eating ice cream cones in DC. Forgot to get a selfie, so here’s a reminder to be good to the planet instead. #carrierpigeon #museumlife #nerdfriends #NatGeoFest


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Photo by @amivitale. Kamara, a Kenyan rhino keeper is nuzzled by black rhino Kilifi who he hand-raised along with two other baby rhinos at the Lewa Wildlife Conservancy (@lewa_wildlife) in Kenya. Kamara spends 12 hours every day watching over the vulnerable baby rhinos. If you went back 50 years, this is where one of the densest populations of black rhinos lived, but today most people living here have never seen a rhino in their life despite it being the most perfect habitat for them. In two generations, this animal was poached almost to extinction. These communities and people like Kamara hold the key to saving Africa's great animals. | These images are being shared in celebration of the 2018 National Geographic Explorers Festival, which brings together innovative scientists, conservationists, explorers, and storytellers from around the world to share their discoveries, insights, and solutions for creating a more sustainable future. To showcase the work of this community, @Cara_Santa_Maria —an award-winning science journalist, the creator of the popular podcast “Talk Nerdy,” and a correspondent on National Geographic’s Explorer television program—has selected six images from photographers who are also National Geographic Explorers. Learn more about the Explorers Festival and watch a livestream at natgeo.com.


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Photo by @erikalarsen888/ Santiago Yahuarcani is a member of the Huitoto Aymeni clan originally coming from La Chorrera a town on the border of Peru and Colombia. His family was removed from their land during the era of exploitation of rubber in the Amazon. Santiago comes from the Jaguar Clan and his last name translates to ‘blood of the jaguar’. The jaguar for the Huitoto people is a powerful and sacred animal. Their shamans can take the form of the jaguars for hunting and other purposes. Santiago and his wife Nereda are now living in Pevas, Peru. They are a family of artists and storytellers who dedicate their life to the preservation of their people’s identity and the knowledge of their ancestors and spiritual world. They create jaguar masks to honor and perpetuate the forms of transformation from human to jaguar. The masks that hold this power are called Janaba. This work is part of a larger project on the communication between humans and the natural world. | These images are being shared in celebration of the 2018 National Geographic Explorers Festival, which brings together innovative scientists, conservationists, explorers, and storytellers from around the world to share their discoveries, insights, and solutions for creating a more sustainable future. To showcase the work of this community, @Cara_Santa_Maria —an award-winning science journalist, the creator of the popular podcast “Talk Nerdy,” and a correspondent on National Geographic’s Explorer television program—has selected six images from photographers who are also National Geographic Explorers. Learn more about the Explorers Festival and watch a livestream at natgeo.com.


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Photo by @dzalcman Crosses mark the grave sites at a cemetery in Quinhagak, a Yup'ik village of about 800 residents on the southwest coast of Alaska. This image is from an ongoing project on the impact of assimilation policies on Indigenous communities. For all of 2018, I'll be interviewing survivors from Maine to Hawaii about their experiences in government boarding schools, mission schools, and foster care. | These images are being shared in celebration of the 2018 National Geographic Explorers Festival, which brings together innovative scientists, conservationists, explorers, and storytellers from around the world to share their discoveries, insights, and solutions for creating a more sustainable future. To showcase the work of this community, @Cara_Santa_Maria —an award-winning science journalist, the creator of the popular podcast “Talk Nerdy,” and a correspondent on National Geographic’s Explorer television program—has selected six images from photographers who are also National Geographic Explorers. Learn more about the Explorers Festival and watch a livestream at natgeo.com.


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Video by @anandavarma / An Anna's hummingbird flies in a wind tunnel blowing at 26 miles per hour. These birds may be small, but they are much more powerful than you would think! This video was made possible by a storytelling grant from the National Geographic Society and became part of my hummingbird story for National Geographic Magazine. The focus of the story was on what tools scientists use to study these amazing birds. This video starts at 2000 frames per second and ends at 3000 frames per second. That means by the end, it is playing 100 times slower than what your naked eye would see. I modified an industrial humidifier to create a make-shift fog machine so that the air movement in the wind tunnel would be visible. Scientists use fog machines to visualize the air flow around hummingbird wings and wind tunnels to measure their flight performance. | These images are being shared in celebration of the 2018 National Geographic Explorers Festival, which brings together innovative scientists, conservationists, explorers, and storytellers from around the world to share their discoveries, insights, and solutions for creating a more sustainable future. To showcase the work of this community, @Cara_Santa_Maria —an award-winning science journalist, the creator of the popular podcast “Talk Nerdy,” and a correspondent on National Geographic’s Explorer television program—has selected six images from photographers who are also National Geographic Explorers. Learn more about the Explorers Festival and watch a livestream at natgeo.com.


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Photo by @edkashi / Santos Felipa Abad de Arismendis, 57, lost her son, Frank Jairzinhio Arismendis Abad, 33, last year from CKDu, or chronic kidney disease of unknown etiology. Arismednis lives in Talara, Peru, and her son worked part-time at the docks from 11 to 16 years old when he began to suffer from a kidney-related illness. At 24 years old, he was diagnosed with CKDu and was placed on dialysis. To receive his treatment, he had to travel to Piura, three hours from his home. After heavy rains one day, the road became impassable and he missed his dialysis and died. | These images are being shared in celebration of the 2018 National Geographic Explorers Festival, which brings together innovative scientists, conservationists, explorers, and storytellers from around the world to share their discoveries, insights, and solutions for creating a more sustainable future. To showcase the work of this community, @Cara_Santa_Maria —an award-winning science journalist, the creator of the popular podcast “Talk Nerdy,” and a correspondent on National Geographic’s Explorer television program—has selected six images from photographers who are also National Geographic Explorers. Learn more about the Explorers Festival and watch a livestream at natgeo.com.


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#Repost @natgeo with @get_repost
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Photo by @hannahreyesmorales / Young boys attempt to fly plastic kites in an abandoned boat in Tondo, Philippines—one of the most densely populated places on Earth. The neighborhood of Baseco, where the boys live, rests where the Pasig River and the Manila Bay meet, and much of the community's plastic waste winds up in the waters. The Philippines is at the center of the world's marine biodiversity, but ranks third, after China and Indonesia, in ocean pollution. | These images are being shared in celebration of the 2018 National Geographic Explorers Festival, which brings together innovative scientists, conservationists, explorers, and storytellers from around the world to share their discoveries, insights, and solutions for creating a more sustainable future. To showcase the work of this community, @Cara_Santa_Maria—an award-winning science journalist, the creator of the popular podcast “Talk Nerdy,” and a correspondent on National Geographic’s Explorer television program—has selected six images from photographers who are also National Geographic Explorers. Learn more about the Explorers Festival and watch a livestream at natgeo.com.


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I am absolutely HONORED to be curating the @natgeo Instagram feed! I'll be highlighting images from photographers who are also National Geographic Explorers, in honor of #NatGeoFest 2018! (Oh yeah, I’m also hosting it for the next two days—check it out!)


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Hosting the @natgeo Explorers Festival today and tomorrow at HQ in DC! Join us live at natgeo.com!
#NatGeoFest


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Can anyone guess what I’m up to this week?


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Pride Nails! 🏳️️‍🌈 #ManicureMonday #Pride #RainbowBright 🌈


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Got a super mansplainy email this week, so we talked about it on the Skeptics’ Guide to the Universe (the other podcast I work on). And what do you know? I’m now getting angry emails mansplaining to me why mansplainers aren’t actually mansplaining, but are just trying to help. 🙄🤦🏻‍♀️🤮


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