Onedayinmyworld@onedayinmyworld

@witness_change campaign amplifying voices and uncovering stories of people living with mental health conditions around the world.

www.onedayinmyworld.com/

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Onedayinmyworld

50 year old Rohingya Mohammad Yunus sold fuel for cooking before he fled Myanmar in September 2017. The Rohingya people are one of the most persecuted minority groups in the world. Following a concerted campaign of extreme violence by the Myanmar authorities against Rohingya people in Myanmar’s Rakhine State in August 2017, at least 700,000 Rohingya fled over the border into Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh. Living conditions in the Cox’s Bazar refugee camps, now the largest in the world, are dire. Many people lack access to clean water, sanitation, health care and shelter. The mental and psychosocial impact of not only being forcibly displaced, but also the difficult conditions of the camp, continue to affect the Rohingya refugees.
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One year ago this week “ethnic cleansing” perpetrated by the Myanmar military against the Rohingya sparked a massive refugee crisis. Nearly a million Rohingya – those who escaped the flames and executions – are now living in camps in Bangladesh. Many of them were raped, most saw loved ones killed, thousands arrived wounded. All are traumatized. Here, in this impoverished monsoon soaked corner of Bangladesh, is one of the most densely populated areas of PTSD affected and depressed people on earth.
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#inmyworld is designed to expose the challenges faced by people living with #mentalhealth issues and give them the chance to be seen, heard and valued. @witness_change is a nonprofit that aims to improve life for excluded groups by amplifying their stories. This work was made in collaboration with Médecins Sans Frontières @doctorswithoutborders who are providing mental health support to the refugees and local population. Photo by @hammond_robin. To see more or to share your own mental health story please follow @onedayinmyworld


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Onedayinmyworld

The family of the deceased husband of Rohingya refugee Rohima Khatun, 25, in the refugee camp they now call home. “We came to Bangladesh because the Mogh (local Rakhine Buddhists) were torturing us," says Rohima. "They told us that we don't have any right to stay in this country, and you should go back to Bangladesh.” She explains what happened to her: "They separated the men and women. They handcuffed the men and they started raping the young girls. The men were shouting and so were the children. They started beating both.” They set fire to the houses. Military men went to rape her she said, but when they saw she was seven months pregnant and carrying a four-year old child they left her. The child was terrified and started screaming: “The four year old was crying so they took the child from me and threw him in the fire and they shot my husband in front of me, in the yard of our house.” She discusses life now, a year later: “Every single moment I remember this and get emotional because i lost my neighbor, husband, child, relatives.”
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One year ago this week “ethnic cleansing” perpetrated by the Myanmar military against the Rohingya sparked a massive refugee crisis. Nearly a million Rohingya – those who escaped the flames and executions – are now living in camps in Bangladesh. Many of them were raped, most saw loved ones killed, thousands arrived wounded. All are traumatized. Here, in this impoverished monsoon soaked corner of Bangladesh, is one of the most densely populated areas of PTSD affected and depressed people on earth.
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#inmyworld is designed to expose the challenges faced by people living with #mentalhealth issues and give them the chance to be seen, heard and valued. @witness_change is a nonprofit that aims to improve life for excluded groups by amplifying their stories. This work was made in collaboration with Médecins Sans Frontières @doctorswithoutborders who are providing mental health support to the refugees and local population. Photo by @hammond_robin. To see more or to share your own mental health story please follow @onedayinmyworld


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Onedayinmyworld

"I feel very disturbed thinking about the incidents [which] happened before my eyes," says Bachamiah, 55, a Rohingya refugee. "I saw people getting killed brutally, a child was thrown into the fire... I think if I hadn't seen these incidents happening before my eyes, perhaps it could be more easier for me to lead a happy life. But now most of the time it comes into my mind and makes me unhappy."
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One year ago “ethnic cleansing” perpetrated by the Myanmar military against the Rohingya sparked a massive refugee crisis. Nearly a million Rohingya – those who escaped the flames and executions – are now living in camps in Bangladesh. Many of them were raped, most saw loved ones killed, thousands arrived wounded. All are traumatized. Here, in this impoverished monsoon soaked corner of Bangladesh, is one of the most densely populated areas of PTSD affected and depressed people on earth.
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#inmyworld is designed to expose the challenges faced by people living with #mentalhealth issues and give them the chance to be seen, heard and valued. @witness_change is a nonprofit that aims to improve life for excluded groups by amplifying their stories. This work was made in collaboration with Médecins Sans Frontières @doctorswithoutborders who are providing mental health support to the refugees and local population. Photo by @hammond_robin. To see more or to share your own mental health story please follow @onedayinmyworld


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Onedayinmyworld

Nightmares bring 12 year old Rohingya refugee Johura back to the day that 14 of her 16 family members were killed. But her most regular dream is of eating a meal with her mother and sister in their Myanmar village. What food do you like? “I don’t feel hungry.” Ever? “If I feel very hungry, I have a little rice.” Why don’t you enjoy eating? “When I think of my parents, I don’t feel good eating.” Do you think about them often? “Yes. I do. With every breath I take.”
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One of life’s greatest misconceptions is a simple fable. That time is a healer. One year ago this week “ethnic cleansing” perpetrated by the Myanmar military against the Rohingya sparked a massive refugee crisis. Nearly a million Rohingya – those who escaped the flames and executions – are now living in camps in Bangladesh. Many of them were raped, most saw loved ones killed, thousands arrived wounded. All are traumatized. Here, in this impoverished monsoon soaked corner of Bangladesh, is one of the most densely populated areas of PTSD affected and depressed people on earth.
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Johura was semi-conscious much of the journey from Myanmar to Bangladesh. She had lost a lot of blood from a bullet that struck her hip. However from the shoulder of the man carrying her she shook awake to see a group of boys - one of them her 10-year-old brother - her only surviving sibling. And there is her light - the glimmer of hope in which she might find peace. Neither food, nor friends, nor playing, nor pretty dresses make her happy. How about you brother, does your brother make you happy? “If my brother is happy, that can make me happy - in here, he is the only one who can.”
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#inmyworld is designed to expose the challenges faced by people living with #mentalhealth issues and give them the chance to be seen, heard and valued. @witness_change is a nonprofit that aims to improve life for excluded groups by amplifying their stories. This work was made in collaboration with Médecins Sans Frontières @doctorswithoutborders who are providing mental health support to the refugees and local population. Photo by @hammond_robin. To see more or to share your own mental health story please follow @onedayinmyworld


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Onedayinmyworld

12 year old Rohingya refugee Johura Begum in Khoranic School. She lost 14 of her 16 family members when the Burmese military attacked her village in Rakhnie state of Myanmar. The only other survivor was her 10 year old brother. “The military people announced that we’d be fine, that we shouldn’t worry. They separated the men from the women… I saw everything with my eyes. People were being gathered by the side of the river. The pretty women were being taken somewhere. And the older men, they were being killed. Before they were killed they were given the task of digging holes to bury themselves.”
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One year ago this week “ethnic cleansing” perpetrated by the Myanmar military against the Rohingya sparked a massive refugee crisis. Nearly a million Rohingya – those who escaped the flames and executions – are now living in camps in Bangladesh. Many of them were raped, most saw loved ones killed, thousands arrived wounded. All are traumatized. Here, in this impoverished monsoon soaked corner of Bangladesh, is one of the most densely populated areas of PTSD affected and depressed people on earth.
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#inmyworld is designed to expose the challenges faced by people living with #mentalhealth issues and give them the chance to be seen, heard and valued. @witness_change is a nonprofit that aims to improve life for excluded groups by amplifying their stories. This work was made in collaboration with Médecins Sans Frontières @doctorswithoutborders who are providing mental health support to the refugees and local population. Photo by @hammond_robin. To see more or to share your own mental health story please follow @onedayinmyworld


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Onedayinmyworld

Salima Khatun, 20, fled to Bangladesh from Myanmar on 01 September 2017. “The military came at 3 am in the morning,” says Salima. She explains how they took the women aside and handcuffed the men. Then, in front of the men, they started raping the women from the village. “My husband tried to save me,” she says. Her son was standing with her husband when he rose to his feet and tried to stop the military men from raping his wife. One of the military men raised his gun and shot at her husband. He missed. The bullet killed her six year old child. The military men then went to beating her husband “…with their hands, their rifles, their boots.” Then they loaded the men into vehicles and drove them away. “That was the last time I saw my husband,” she says. One year later, from the safety of the sprawling refugee camp which is now her home, she speaks of the pain she still feels: “When I remember the torture by the military I feel very painful in my heart… Every night I remember what happened… All the time I’m happy in the camp but at night, when I’m alone, I feel bad.”
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One year ago this week “ethnic cleansing” perpetrated by the Myanmar military against the Rohingya sparked a massive refugee crisis. Nearly a million Rohingya – those who escaped the flames and executions – are now living in camps in Bangladesh. Many of them were raped, most saw loved ones killed, thousands arrived wounded. All are traumatized. Here, in this impoverished monsoon soaked corner of Bangladesh, is one of the most densely populated areas of PTSD affected and depressed people on earth.
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#inmyworld is designed to expose the challenges faced by people living with #mentalhealth issues and give them the chance to be seen, heard and valued. @witness_change is a nonprofit that aims to improve life for excluded groups by amplifying their stories. This work was made in collaboration with Médecins Sans Frontières @doctorswithoutborders who are providing mental health support to the refugees and local population. Photo by @hammond_robin. To see more or to share your own mental health story please follow @onedayinmyworld


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Onedayinmyworld

50 year old Rohingya refugee Mohammad Yunus sold fuel for cooking before he fled Myanmar in September 2017.
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One year ago this week “ethnic cleansing” perpetrated by the Myanmar military against the Rohingya sparked a massive refugee crisis. Nearly a million Rohingya – those who escaped the flames and executions – are now living in camps in Bangladesh. Many of them were raped, most saw loved ones killed, thousands arrived wounded. All are traumatized. Here, in this impoverished monsoon soaked corner of Bangladesh, is one of the most densely populated areas of PTSD affected and depressed people on earth.
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#inmyworld is designed to expose the challenges faced by people living with #mentalhealth issues and give them the chance to be seen, heard and valued. @witness_change is a nonprofit that aims to improve life for excluded groups by amplifying their stories. This work was made in collaboration with Médecins Sans Frontières @doctorswithoutborders who are providing mental health support to the refugees and local population. Photo by @hammond_robin. To see more or to share your own mental health story please follow @onedayinmyworld


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Onedayinmyworld

Johura Begum, 12, and her 10 year old brother Hyrul Amin now live with their aunt and uncle in a sprawling refugee camp in Bangladesh. They lost 14 of their 16 family members when the Burmese military attacked their village in Rakhnie state of Myanmar. They were the only survivors. “The military people announced that we’d be fine, that we shouldn’t worry. They separated the men from the women… I saw everything with my eyes. People were being gathered by the side of the river. The pretty women were being taken somewhere. And the older men, they were being killed. Before they were killed they were given the task of digging holes to bury themselves.” Johura got away. “When I was running to save my life i fell in the river then I was shot. I climbed out of the river and into the graveyard... I saw one of my sisters shot in the face. She had blood all over her face... then I fainted. When I woke up a man was carrying me. He was running. I woke up and along the way I saw my young brother.” Johura spent 14 days in hospital. She now lives with her brother and her aunt in one of the sprawling refugee camps for Rohingya in Bangladesh.
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One year ago this week “ethnic cleansing” perpetrated by the Myanmar military against the Rohingya sparked a massive refugee crisis. Nearly a million Rohingya – those who escaped the flames and executions – are now living in camps in Bangladesh. Many of them were raped, most saw loved ones killed, thousands arrived wounded. All are traumatized. Here, in this impoverished monsoon soaked corner of Bangladesh, is one of the most densely populated areas of PTSD affected and depressed people on earth.
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#inmyworld is designed to expose the challenges faced by people living with #mentalhealth issues and give them the chance to be seen, heard and valued. @witness_change is a nonprofit that aims to improve life for excluded groups by amplifying their stories. This work was made in collaboration with Médecins Sans Frontières @doctorswithoutborders who are providing mental health support to the refugees and local population. Photo by @hammond_robin. To see more or to share your own mental health story please follow @onedayinmyworld


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Onedayinmyworld

25 year old Fatima Khatun fled her village of Chorpara Rasidong with her five year old daughter Yeasamin Akter (pictured), and four month old Tawhid Uddin, because, as Fatima says, “the military people were torturing people.” She adds that her husband was made a slave, mosques closed down, people forbidden to marry, and “the pretty women and girls were raped in front of parents and brothers." She and her children were forced to leave when the military started burning the houses in their village. When the fire reached their house Yeasamin was still inside. Fatima rushed to her when she heard her screaming. She saved her from the flames but not before her leg and buttocks were badly burnt. In the refugee camp, "there is no peace as we don’t have our own land, our own people, and our country,” says Fatima. What particularly worries her is the difficult future her daughter will face: “They destroyed her life — if it was a son I could get over that, but because she’s a girl, they have destroyed her life - as we don’t have any money or land somehow we need to get our daughter married...”
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One year ago this week “ethnic cleansing” perpetrated by the Myanmar military against the Rohingya sparked a massive refugee crisis. Nearly a million Rohingya – those who escaped the flames and executions – are now living in camps in Bangladesh. Many of them were raped, most saw loved ones killed, thousands arrived wounded. All are traumatized. Here, in this impoverished monsoon soaked corner of Bangladesh, is one of the most densely populated areas of PTSD affected and depressed people on earth.
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#inmyworld is designed to expose the challenges faced by people living with #mentalhealth issues and give them the chance to be seen, heard and valued. @witness_change is a nonprofit that aims to improve life for excluded groups by amplifying their stories. This work was made in collaboration with Médecins Sans Frontières @doctorswithoutborders who are providing mental health support to the refugees and local population. Photo by @hammond_robin. To see more or to share your own mental health story please follow @onedayinmyworld


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Onedayinmyworld

“When people experience a trauma, especially a great life threatening trauma, that trauma never really goes away, but they can learn to recover, they can learn to move on, they can learn to put their lives back together. And they do that by relying on coping skills," says Jodi Nelan, a Mental Health Activities Manager with Médecins Sans Frontières. "We can help them with that by teaching them new things, but it is really hard when they are living in the camp to be able to cope, to be able to put things back together. They have fewer options, they have more stressors. So a lot of people find it difficult to move forward.”
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One year ago this week “ethnic cleansing” perpetrated by the Myanmar military against the Rohingya sparked a massive refugee crisis. Nearly a million Rohingya – those who escaped the flames and executions – are now living in camps in Bangladesh. Many of them were raped, most saw loved ones killed, thousands arrived wounded. All are traumatized. Here, in this impoverished monsoon soaked corner of Bangladesh, is one of the most densely populated areas of PTSD affected and depressed people on earth.
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#inmyworld is designed to expose the challenges faced by people living with #mentalhealth issues and give them the chance to be seen, heard and valued. @witness_change is a nonprofit that aims to improve life for excluded groups by amplifying their stories. This work was made in collaboration with Médecins Sans Frontières @doctorswithoutborders who are providing mental health support to the refugees and local population. Photo by @hammond_robin. To see more or to share your own mental health story please follow @onedayinmyworld


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Onedayinmyworld

“I’m thinking about my brother day and night.” 23 year old Rohingya Asmot Ullah was was shot in the leg as he ran with his brother from the Myanmar military who were attacking his village. He looked up from the ground where he fell to see his brother stumble after being shot in the stomach. His brother died where he lay. “When I think about him I do not feel peaceful,” says Asmot.
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“Mental illness” does not translate into the Rohingya language. Instead they talk about a peaceful state of mind to express wellbeing. Un-peaceful minds are troubled, depressed, anxious, traumatised. The Rohingya have more reason than most not feel at peace.
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One year ago this week “ethnic cleansing” perpetrated by the Myanmar military against the Rohingya sparked a massive refugee crisis. Nearly a million Rohingya – those who escaped the flames and executions – are now living in camps in Bangladesh. Many of them were raped, most saw loved ones killed, thousands arrived wounded. All are traumatized. Here, in this impoverished monsoon soaked corner of Bangladesh, is one of the most densely populated areas of PTSD affected and depressed people on earth.
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#inmyworld is designed to expose the challenges faced by people living with #mentalhealth issues and give them the chance to be seen, heard and valued. @witness_change is a nonprofit that aims to improve life for excluded groups by amplifying their stories. This work was made in collaboration with Médecins Sans Frontières @doctorswithoutborders who are providing mental health support to the refugees and local population. Photo by @hammond_robin. To see more or to share your own mental health story please follow @onedayinmyworld


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Onedayinmyworld

12 year old Johura Begum and her 10 year old brother Hyrul Amin now live with their aunt and uncle in a sprawling refugee camp in Bangladesh. They lost 14 of their 16 family members when the Burmese military attacked their village in Rakhnie state of Myanmar. They were the only survivors. One year after the attack, she says: “A lot of kids can call for their parents but we don’t have parents to call out to. Whenever I can’t call for my parents, I don’t feel peaceful... whenever I feel the pain (from the wound), what the military people did in Myanmar, I remember that… I don’t feel good at all here, I want to see my parents and siblings and now that I have to live in someone else house, I don’t like it... The other kids are peaceful, that’s why they are playing. I’m not peaceful in my body that’s what I can’t play… Me and my brother have all the worries of this world.”
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One of life’s greatest misconceptions is a simple fable. That time is a healer. One year ago this week “ethnic cleansing” perpetrated by the Myanmar military against the Rohingya sparked a massive refugee crisis. Nearly a million Rohingya – those who escaped the flames and executions – are now living in camps in Bangladesh. Many of them were raped, most saw loved ones killed, thousands arrived wounded. All are traumatized. Here, in this impoverished monsoon soaked corner of Bangladesh, is one of the most densely populated areas of PTSD affected and depressed people on earth.
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#inmyworld is designed to expose the challenges faced by people living with #mentalhealth issues and give them the chance to be seen, heard and valued. @witness_change is a nonprofit that aims to improve life for excluded groups by amplifying their stories. This work was made in collaboration with Médecins Sans Frontières @doctorswithoutborders who are providing mental health support to the refugees and local population. Photo by @hammond_robin. To see more or to share your own mental health story please follow @onedayinmyworld


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