Andrea Frazzetta@andrea_frazzetta

Photographer // Contributor to
The New York Times Magazine -
National Geographic Travel - Based in Milan - Represented by INSTITUTE
@instituteartist

http://www.andreafrazzetta.com/

The Atacama Desert in northern Chile is the driest non-polar desert on Earth. The Mano de Desierto is a large-scale sculpture of a hand located on the Panamerican Highway. The sculpture was constructed by the Chilean sculptor Mario Irarrázabal at an altitude of 1,100 meters above sea level. Its exaggerated size is said to emphasize human vulnerability and helplessness.
This is a picture from the series “In Her Orbit” shot for the New York Times Magazine and in print this week on D la Repubblica.
For this assignment, I’ve been in Chile following of the legendary Nathalie Cabrol and her team at the SETI Institute. Cabrol is an explorer, an astrobiologist and a planetary geologist specializing in Mars.
@nytmag @drepubblicait @instituteartist @setiinstitute #Chile #mars


18

The “Valle della Muerte” - The Death Valley of Chile. Near San Pedro de Atacama.
A picture from the series “In Her Orbit” shot for the New York Times Magazine and in print this week on D la Repubblica.
A mission led by Nathalie Cabrol, the head of the SETI Institute and the world's foremost expert in the study of bio-organisms on Mars, is conducting a detailed study of the geological characteristics of these places of Chile.
@nytmag @drepubblicait @instituteartist @setiinstitute #Chile #mars


8

“D la Repubblica” was the first Magazine I've ever published with. That’s why I’m very happy to be back on it, on the Cover, with a story dedicated to the extraordinary Nathalie Cabrol. Thanks @manilacamarini. @instituteartist @drepubblicait #portrait #science #nasa #seti


17

A solitary fisherman at Papuma Bay. Papuma is a scenic beach on East Java, Indonesia, is quite popular among the people of Java for the white sands and the big rocks. Besides its natural scenic beauty, Papuma is also rich of exotic animals.
Indonesia is situated on the Ring of Fire—a 25,000-mile seismically active belt of volcanoes and tectonic plate boundaries that frame the Pacific basin. About five million Indonesians live and work near active volcanoes, where farming soil is most fertile. Java alone is home to 141 million people—one of the most densely populated islands on Earth.
“Sulfur Road” my latest assignment for National Geographic is on line, check it on NatGeo website.
@andrea_frazzetta @natgeotravel @instituteartist #natgeotravel #ijen #java #indonesia #volcano #papuma


17

A panoramic view of the forest surrounding Mount Ijen. - Swipe left for the rest -
Mount Ijen, on the Island of Java, Indonesia, hosts one of the last remaining active sulfur mines in the world.
Active since 1968, the mine produces 14 tons of sulfur per day, which is mainly exported to China and Southeast Asia.
Indonesia is situated on the Ring of Fire—a 25,000-mile seismically active belt of volcanoes and tectonic plate boundaries that frame the Pacific basin. About five million Indonesians live and work near active volcanoes, where farming soil is most fertile. Java alone is home to 141 million people—one of the most densely populated islands on Earth.
“Sulfur Road” my latest assignment for National Geographic is online, check it on NatGeo website.
@andrea_frazzetta @natgeotravel @instituteartist #natgeotravel #dronephotography #ijen #java #indonesia #volcano #sulfur #miners


20

Sunarto, one of Mount Ijen's miners, was born in the nearby village of Plambang where he now lives with his family, including his son Marko. He earns an average of 10 dollars a day in the mines.
Mount Ijen, on the Island of Java, Indonesia, hosts one of the last remaining active sulfur mines in the world.
Every day, miners make the arduous trek up Ijen’s 9,000-foot slopes under the cover darkness before descending another 3,000 feet into the crater. Enveloped in toxic fumes and heat, they chip away at the hardened blocks and carry 150 to 200-pound loads back up the crater twice a day.
Indonesia is situated on the Ring of Fire—a 25,000-mile seismically active belt of volcanoes and tectonic plate boundaries that frame the Pacific basin. About five million Indonesians live and work near active volcanoes, where farming soil is most fertile. Java alone is home to 141 million people—one of the most densely populated islands on Earth.
“Sulfur Road” my latest assignment for National Geographic is online, check it on NatGeo website.
@andrea_frazzetta @natgeotravel @instituteartist #natgeo #natgeotravel #ijen #java #indonesia #sulfur #miners


26

Mount Ijen, on the Island of Java, Indonesia, hosts one of the last remaining active sulfur mines in the world.
Active since 1968, the mine produces 14 tons of sulfur per day, which is mainly exported to China and Southeast Asia.
Sulfur it is used to refine sugar, to produce sulfuric acid, and it can be found in many products of regular use such as medicines, cosmetics, matches, fertilizer, insecticides and fungicides.
Considered a form of cultural heritage tourism, mine tours can be found around the world from Africa to Australia. Unlike Mount Ijen, few are still active, and many have been “museumified.”
Some researchers propose tourists are attracted to these sites because they elicit what philosophers have termed “the sublime”—a feeling of pleasure in seeing a dangerous but awe-inspiring object, like a violent act of nature. Victor Hugo defined it as “a combination of the grotesque and beautiful as opposed to the classical ideal of perfection.”
Mount Ijen is sublime.
“Sulfur Road” my latest assignment for National Geographic is on line, check it on NatGeo website.
@andrea_frazzetta @natgeotravel @instituteartist #natgeotravel #ijen #java #indonesia #sulfur #miners


25

Ijen volcano hosts the world's largest acidic crater lake, famous for its rich turquoise color. Scientists fear a release of the acid lake from an eruption or earthquake could be catastrophic for surrounding communities.
Mount Ijen, on the Island of Java, Indonesia, hosts one of the last remaining active sulfur mines in the world, and its otherworldly vistas have captivated travelers for more than two centuries.
“Sulfur Road” my latest assignment for National Geographic is on line, check it on NatGeo website.
@andrea_frazzetta @natgeotravel @instituteartist #natgeotravel #ijen #java #indonesia #sulfur #miners


29

Shrouded in sulfuric gas, a miner uses a metal pole to extract lumps of sulfur.
Mount Ijen, on the Island of Java, Indonesia, hosts one of the last remaining active sulfur mines in the world.
Enveloped in toxic fumes and heat, the miners chip away at the hardened blocks and carry 150 to 200-pound loads back up the crater twice a day.
“Sulfur Road” my latest assignment for National Geographic is on line, check it on NatGeo website.
@andrea_frazzetta @natgeotravel @instituteartist #natgeotravel #ijen #java #indonesia #sulfur #miners


23

A miner's headlamp cuts through the darkness and volcanic gas. Miners often begin their work at night before the sun's heat becomes too oppressive.
Mount Ijen, on the Island of Java, Indonesia, hosts one of the last remaining active sulfur mines in the world.
Every day, miners make the arduous trek up Ijen’s 9,000-foot slopes under the cover darkness before descending another 3,000 feet into the crater. Enveloped in toxic fumes and heat, they chip away at the hardened blocks and carry 150 to 200-pound loads back up the crater twice a day.
“Sulfur Road” my latest assignment for National Geographic is online, check it on NatGeo website.
@andrea_frazzetta @natgeotravel @instituteartist #natgeotravel #ijen #java #indonesia #sulfur #miners


47

Sunarto, 41 years old, carries a load of sulfur out of the crater. Mount Ijen, on the Island of Java, Indonesia, hosts one of the last remaining active sulfur mines in the world, and while its otherworldly vistas have captivated scientists and travelers for more than two centuries, in recent decades, the miners themselves have become a controversial tourist attraction.
Every day, miners make the arduous trek up Ijen’s 9,000-foot slopes under the cover darkness before descending another 3,000 feet into the crater. Enveloped in toxic fumes and heat, they chip away at the hardened blocks and carry 150 to 200-pound loads back up the crater twice a day.
“Sulfur Road” my latest assignment for National Geographic is online, check it on NatGeo website.
@andrea_frazzetta @natgeotravel @instituteartist #natgeotravel #ijen #java #indonesia #sulfur #miners


37

Mount Ijen, on the Island of Java, Indonesia, hosts one of the last remaining active sulfur mines in the world. Since 1968, the sulfur miners have ventured into this unpredictable labyrinth of gas clouds and superheated fumaroles to extract “devil’s gold” and carry it back down the mountain. Ijen’s half-mile turquoise crater lake takes on an eerie glow in the darkness. Deceptively beautiful, it has a pH lower than that of battery acid—the largest acid lake on Earth, caustic enough to dissolve metal.
“Sulfur Road” my latest assignment for National Geographic is online, check it on NatGeo website.
@andrea_frazzetta @natgeotravel @instituteartist #natgeotravel #ijen #java #indonesia #sulfur #miners #drone


27

The end of the page