andy_bardon@andy_bardon

Photographer & Director
Contributor @NatGeo

www.andybardon.com/

715 posts 108,478 followers 475 following

andy_bardon

Out for a dive with the boys


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andy_bardon

🌱 Details. 😊


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andy_bardon

🌴Island life 🥥


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andy_bardon

🔷Blues 🔵


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andy_bardon

Salt water therapy 💦😛


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andy_bardon

A Tahitian pearl farmer heads the the surface for a much needed breath of air while swimming with a few baskets of pearl oysters. So impressive to watch this team harvest this regenerative gemstone. Sustainability matters @kamokapearl /// Shot for @natgeo @waittfoundation @waittinstitute


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andy_bardon

🍂Changing of the seasons. Enjoying the last bits of fall before winter arrives 🍁


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andy_bardon

🦁Lioness @resistiegler


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andy_bardon

Words by @erinkaoyama /// My grandmother, Misa Hatakeyama, was 20 years old, just a few years younger than I am now, when she was sent to the prison camp at Heart Mountain, Wyoming. I have so many memories of Gra, as we called her, from growing up - sitting next to her on our couch while she knit a sweater for me or for one of my siblings, trying desperately to master using chopsticks while she patiently demonstrated, or running to her terrified after accidentally catching an eel while fishing in the pond by our house. But Gra never talked about her time at Heart Mountain. So what I know about that period of her life is what I’ve been able to glean from government records or the interpretive center that sits at the site of the former concentration camp, doing the work of memorializing the lives lived there during the just over three years that the camp was open. According to WRA records, Gra had completed nearly two years of college when the evacuation order went into effect. And from the registry at the Heart Mountain Wyoming Interpretive Center, I know that 20-year-old Misa volunteered to take the very first train out to Heart Mountain from the Pomona Assembly Center on August 12, 1942. She went by herself, without her older brother or her parents, to help finish setting up the mess hall or maybe the hospital. And she left Heart Mountain, with her parents, on June 9, 1943. I spent over a month this summer working at the Heart Mountain Interpretive Center, to learn about who comes to visit and why and also to share my family's connection to the site. I found that my being there, representing an embodiment of the camp's legacy, sometimes helped to make the stories and the history more real for many of our visitors. It was a complex but beautiful experience, working everyday surrounded by the history that completely changed the course of my family’s lives. I am incredibly grateful to have spent time at Heart Mountain, working with the staff and the community, to honor the memory of my grandma and to share those memories and this history with so many folks from around the world. /// Shot for the @omoiyari_songfilm


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andy_bardon

Words by @erinkaoyama ///My grandmother, Misa Hatakeyama, was 20 years old, just a few years younger than I am now, when she was sent to the prison camp at Heart Mountain, Wyoming. I have so many memories of Gra, as we called her, from growing up - sitting next to her on our couch while she knit a sweater for me or for one of my siblings, trying desperately to master using chopsticks while she patiently demonstrated, or running to her terrified after accidentally catching an eel while fishing in the pond by our house. But Gra never talked about her time at Heart Mountain. So what I know about that period of her life is what I’ve been able to glean from government records or the interpretive center that sits at the site of the former concentration camp, doing the work of memorializing the lives lived there during the just over three years that the camp was open. According to WRA records, Gra had completed nearly two years of college when the evacuation order went into effect. And from the registry at the Heart Mountain Wyoming Interpretive Center, I know that 20-year-old Misa volunteered to take the very first train out to Heart Mountain from the Pomona Assembly Center on August 12, 1942. She went by herself, without her older brother or her parents, to help finish setting up the mess hall or maybe the hospital. And she left Heart Mountain, with her parents, on June 9, 1943. I spent over a month this summer working at the Heart Mountain Interpretive Center, to learn about who comes to visit and why and also to share my family's connection to the site. I found that my being there, representing an embodiment of the camp's legacy, sometimes helped to make the stories and the history more real for many of our visitors. It was a complex but beautiful experience, working everyday surrounded by the history that completely changed the course of my family’s lives. I am incredibly grateful to have spent time at Heart Mountain, working with the staff and the community, to honor the memory of my grandma and to share those memories and this history with so many folks from around the world. /// Shot for @omoiyari_songfilm


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andy_bardon

Words by @erinkaoyama /// My grandmother, Misa Hatakeyama, was 20 years old, just a few years younger than I am now, when she was sent to the prison camp at Heart Mountain, Wyoming. I have so many memories of Gra, as we called her, from growing up - sitting next to her on our couch while she knit a sweater for me or for one of my siblings, trying desperately to master using chopsticks while she patiently demonstrated, or running to her terrified after accidentally catching an eel while fishing in the pond by our house. But Gra never talked about her time at Heart Mountain. So what I know about that period of her life is what I’ve been able to glean from government records or the interpretive center that sits at the site of the former concentration camp, doing the work of memorializing the lives lived there during the just over three years that the camp was open. According to WRA records, Gra had completed nearly two years of college when the evacuation order went into effect. And from the registry at the Heart Mountain Wyoming Interpretive Center, I know that 20-year-old Misa volunteered to take the very first train out to Heart Mountain from the Pomona Assembly Center on August 12, 1942. She went by herself, without her older brother or her parents, to help finish setting up the mess hall or maybe the hospital. And she left Heart Mountain, with her parents, on June 9, 1943. I spent over a month this summer working at the Heart Mountain Interpretive Center, to learn about who comes to visit and why and also to share my family's connection to the site. I found that my being there, representing an embodiment of the camp's legacy, sometimes helped to make the stories and the history more real for many of our visitors. It was a complex but beautiful experience, working everyday surrounded by the history that completely changed the course of my family’s lives. I am incredibly grateful to have spent time at Heart Mountain, working with the staff and the community, to honor the memory of my grandma and to share those memories and this history with so many folks from around the world. /// Shot for @omoiyari_songfilm on 35mm film


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andy_bardon

Winter is coming 🤩


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