Aperture Foundation@aperturefnd

Aperture connects the photo community with the most inspiring work, the sharpest ideas, and with each other—in print, in person, and online.

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❤️💛💚💙💜 Happy #Pride!
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“Ethan Jame Green’s (@ethanjamesgreen) portraits bring to mind Diane Arbus’s midcentury studies of gender nonconformists, except Green emphasizes not their otherness, but their beauty and empowerment. Today’s trans youth, after all, have the cultural agency to tell their own stories, and Green treats them as collaborators.” –Michael Schulman, from Aperture Issue 229, “Future Gender”, see more through the link in our bio.
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Photo by Ethan James Green, Maria and Massima, 2017 #lgbtq


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Catherine Opie, Oliver in a Tutu, 2004, from the series In and Around Home.
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Since her debut at the 1995 Whitney Biennial, Catherine Opie has deployed photography to make the LGBT community visible. At times, she has focused on S&M practices, her signature Self-Portrait/Pervert (1994), Opie, though, insists that she not be defined by a single identity; her gaze is generous. Read more in Aperture’s “Future Gender” issue, from the link in bio.
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Image ©️ the artist and courtesy Regen Projects, Los Angeles, and Lehmann Maupin, New York and Hong Kong


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Mickalene Thomas draws on cultural icons and her relationships with lovers and family alike to subvert the male gaze and assert new definitions of beauty. ‘Muse’ gathers together her various approaches to photography in a courageous exploration of gender and sexuality.
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To celebrate Pride, all weekend we'll be sharing images from our archive focused on LGBTQ communities. See more through the link in our bio.
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Image: Mickalene Thomas, Din, une très belle négresse #1, 2012, from "Muse: Mickalene Thomas Photographs" (Aperture, 2015) ©️ Mickalene Thomas, Lehmann Maupin, New York and Hong Kong and Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York #pride #lgbtq


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One of the most powerful visual activists of our time, Zanele Muholi’s (@muholizanele) photographs are radical statements of identity, race, and resistance. As Muholi states, “I am producing this photographic document to encourage people to be brave enough to occupy spaces, brave enough to create without fear of being vilified.”
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Zanele Muholi: Somnyama Ngonyama, Hail the Dark Lioness is available now for pre-order, from the link in bio.
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Image: Zanele Muholi, Senzekile II, Cincinnati, 2016; from Zanele Muholi: Somnyama Ngonyama, Hail the Dark Lioness (Aperture, 2018) ©️ Zanele Muholi, courtesy of Stevenson Gallery, Cape Town/Johannesburg, and Yancey Richardson Gallery, New York #pride #lgbtq


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“Ren Hang’s photographs do not consciously attempt to address queer identity in China but rather function as a form of play or performance in a place where any explicit declaration of same-sex orientation is still considered risky and nude photographs are routinely labeled pornographic.” –Stephanie H. Tung, from Aperture Issue 218, “Queer”
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To celebrate Pride, all weekend we'll be sharing images from our archive focused on LGBTQ communities. See more through the link in our bio.
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Image: Ren Hang, Untitled, 2014 #renhang #pride #lgbtq


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Joel Meyerowitz, Vivian, Bronx Botanical Gardens, New York City, 1966
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Wander through cherry trees and orange shrubs with photographers such as Joel Meyerowitz, Collier Schorr, and Luigi Ghirri, as featured in The Photographer in the Garden and on Aperture Online. Link in Bio.
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Image ©️ Joel Meyerowitz, Courtesy Howard Greenberg Gallery


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☀️ Happy Summer Solstice ☀️
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For the past thirty years, Martin Parr has captured the world with his colorful and satirical sensibility. Parr’s images chronicle the absurd in the everyday, from sunbathers in Speedos, tea-drinkers and rainbow cakes, to socks with sandals, all with his unique sense of humor. In The Martin Parr Coloring Book! forty-eight of Parr’s iconic mages have been re-imagined into original drawings. Link in bio.
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Image: Martin Parr, Benidorm, Spain, 1997; from The Martin Parr Coloring Book! (Aperture, 2017) ©️ Martin Parr/Magnum Photos #summersolstice


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“I try to portray these moments to reveal how people are occupying time. How life is still going on despite the difficulties people are facing. How they are organizing themselves to fight against the hostility of places they are passing through. At the camp, the body undergoes an 'administrative' status. The evolution of the people in these areas often lasts for years: there’s zero stability; men, women, and children are in a state of precarious vulnerability."
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#WorldRefugeeDay
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Since 2007, the French photographer Samuel Gratacap has followed the lives of refugees and migrants crossing the Mediterranean, documenting moments of departure—and the emotions of waiting. Read more about Gratacap's work in Aperture Issue 222, "Odyssey", from the link in our bio.
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Image: Samuel Gratacap, Departure day, Choucha Camp, Tunisia, 2012–14


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"Time is suspended, space is distorted, light on black skin is a metaphor, and black music, cut into sounds of salvation, carries the narrative."
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Read more from Antwaun Sargent (@sirsargent) on how the films of Kahlil Joseph and Arthur Jafa consider the poetics of African American life, in the “Film & Foto” issue of Aperture magazine and on Aperture Online. Link in bio.
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Image: Ray Francis, Harlem, New York, late 1960s, from the book Timeless: Photographs by Kamoinge Courtesy the artist and Schiffer Publishing


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Calling all photobook makers! The 2018 Paris Photo–Aperture Foundation PhotoBook Awards is now open, celebrating the the photobook’s contribution to the evolving narrative of photography, with three major categories: First PhotoBook, PhotoBook of the Year, and Photography Catalogue of the Year. Enter by June 30 and save with our Early Bird Special.
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Entry details at aperture.org/photobookawards
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Image by Susan Meiselas from Subscription Series No. 5 (@TBWBooks), courtesy of the artist and TBW Books


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“We often forget to recognize how empowering it can feel to be photographed and to be represented. And that’s continued today.” –Zackary Drucker ( @zackarydrucker )
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With more than seventy interviews from Aperture magazine and Aperture photobooks, Aperture Conversations spotlights the voices of renowned photographers in dialogue with leading critics, curators, and writers from 1985 to the present. On sale now as part of our Summer Sale. Link in bio.
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Image: Lia Clay ( @liaclay ), Pierce, 2017, from the series What It Means to Be Trans/GNC & at the Beach in America. Courtesy the artist and @refinery29 #pride #nypride #lgbtq


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For over a decade, Takashi Homma has turned his lens toward Tokyo's suburban environs and urban center. His vision of Tokyo has navigated a finely nuanced line between sterility and sentimentality. As Ivan Vartanian writes, "Homma's once dispassionate eye now shows a modicum of connectivity, of personal involvement. The photographer even inserts himself into his photographs and begins to address themes that are somewhat private: his studio, his desk, his dog….The work ‘My dog, Royce 1, 2005, chosen as the cover image for the artist's monograph, is just such an example of this connectivity."
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This limited edition print coincided with the release of Takashi Homma: Tokyo (Aperture, 2008), the first Homma volume to be published for an international audience. Collect now as part of our Summer Sale. Link in bio.
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Image: Takashi Homma, My Dog, Royce 1, 2005, from Takashi Homma: Tokyo (Aperture, 2008)


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