Aperture Foundation@aperturefnd

Aperture connects the photo community with the most inspiring work, the sharpest ideas, and with each other—in print, in person, and online.

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Aperture Foundation

Lee Friedlander, New York City, 1962.
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Street Art, Street Life (Aperture/The Bronx Museum of the Arts, September 2008) examines the street as subject matter, venue and source of inspiration for contemporary artists and photographers from the late 1950s to the present. Link in bio.
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Image © the artist and Janet Borden, Inc.


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Aperture Foundation

“I have always thought that the darkroom is a sexual place. Its smell is so strong. And if you do it with bare hands, it’s like you’re having sex. Photography has that quality; it engages the five senses. It possesses something like sexuality.” –Daido Moriyama
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With more than seventy interviews from Aperture magazine and Aperture photobooks, Aperture Conversations spotlights the voices of renowned photographers in dialogue with leading critics, curators, and writers from 1985 to the present. Link in bio.
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Image: Daido Moriyama, Tights, 2017 © Daido Moriyama Photo Foundation / Courtesy of Luhring Augustine, New York and Taka Ishii Gallery, Tokyo #daidomoriyama


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Aperture Foundation

Refocus, an exhibition in collaboration between Aperture and @WeTransfer, spotlights three mid-career photographers–Siân Davey, Janet Delaney, and Joe Nishizawa–whose work explores physical and psychological landscapes. .
On view at Aperture Gallery through Wednesday, September 26.
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Image © Siân Davey (@siandavey1)


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Aperture Foundation

“Contrary to popular wisdom, Los Angeles does have a center. Its heart is not spatial (hence the misconception), but memorial. Southern California has formed, pearl-like, around the grain of Latinx people and other people of color who claim the city in the names of their ancestors.” –Yxta Maya Murray
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This is the Los Angeles artist Christina Fernandez showcases in her work. In her series, Maria’s Great Expedition (1995-96), Fernandez creates the narrative of an immortal immigrant journeying from Mexico to Southern California in the nineteenth century. Read more on Fernandez’s work in Aperture magazine’s latest issue, “Los Angeles.” Link in bio.
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Image: Christina Fernandez, Element #6, from the series Maria’s Great Expedition, 1995–96; courtesy the artist and Gallery Luisotti, Santa Monica


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Aperture Foundation

Paul Strand, Iris, 1928.
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Collect this hand-pulled dust-grain photogravure from Paul Strand, printed by master printer Jon Goodman. Featuring an overlay signed by Hazel Strand, wife of the late Paul Strand, it is accompanied by a slipcased copy of Paul Strand: Time in New England, also signed by Hazel Strand. Link in bio.
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Image © Aperture Foundation, Inc., Paul Strand Archive


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Aperture Foundation

✨ Announcing the shortlist of the 2018 Paris Photo–Aperture Foundation PhotoBook Awards ✨
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See the full list at aperture.org/blog.


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Aperture Foundation

Deana Lawson, Mama Goma, 2014.
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Visit us this weekend at the 2018 New York Art Book Fair to shop our latest releases and best sellers, including Deana Lawson: An Aperture Monograph, Stephen Shore Stereographs: New York, 1974, Aperture 232, “Los Angeles”, and more. September 21–23 at @momaps1, for more details, see aperture.org/events.
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Image © 2018 Deana Lawson and courtesy @rhonahoffmangallery, Chicago, and @sikkemajenkins & Co., New York #deanalawson #nyartbookfair @printedmatter_artbookfairs


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Aperture Foundation

“Rather than tap into the conventional documentarian’s sense of knowingness, or the romantic traveler’s sense of sentimentality or nostalgia, many of the works in [Taiyo Onorato & Nico Kreb’s] Eurasia are simply baffling—a plastic bottle atop an iron-oxide red rock formation spews viscous white liquid onto the shallow riverbed below; new monumental architecture shimmers in barren and underdeveloped desert landscapes. ‘As an onlooker, you often can’t figure out what’s going on,’ Krebs says, ‘and that’s partly what this work is about—the incompleteness, or the lack of in-depth understanding that we experienced while we were traveling.’” –Aaron Schuman
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Read more in Aperture 222, “Odyssey.” Available through the link in bio.
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Image: Taiyo Onorato & Nico Kreb, Well, 2013; from Eurasia, 2013–15; Courtesy the artists, RaebervonStenglin, Sies+Höke, and Peter Lav Gallery


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Aperture Foundation

Sergio Larrain, Valparaíso, 1952.
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A notoriously reclusive artist, Sergio Larrain’s photography career was relatively short before he retreated to the Chilean countryside in the late 1960s to study meditation. His most well-known project, Valparaíso, began in 1957 while he traveling with poet Pablo Neruda for Du magazine. After publication in 1991, Larrain informed the publishers that he had made his own facsimile of the book, reflecting on how he would have constructed the layout. Sergio Larrain: Valparaíso (Aperture, 2017) is the first reproduction of this iconic series in book form. Link in bio.
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Image © Sergio Larrain/Magnum Photos


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Aperture Foundation

Dawoud Bey’s "The Birmingham Project" memorializes one of the most heartwrenching attacks of the American civil rights movement: the bombing of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama, by four Klansmen on September 15, 1963. The explosion killed four girls preparing for Sunday school: Addie Mae Collins, 14, Denise McNair, 11, Carole Robertson, 14, and Cynthia Wesley, 14. More than twenty others were injured in the church, and two other black youths lost their lives in the immediate aftermath. Birmingham police shot Johnny Robinson, 16, and white teens murdered Virgil Ware, 13, as he rode his bike through the white side of town.
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In his series of thirty-two black-and-white photographs, Bey pairs Birmingham black youth and adults. His sitters are the ages of the child victims of the attack and the ages they would have been had they lived to be photographed fifty years later. The Birmingham Project forces us to ask a series of what ifs: What if that bomb hadn’t gone off in the Sunday school basement? What if those children had been allowed to grow to adulthood? What if black lives truly mattered?
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Dawoud Bey: The Birmingham Project is on view at the @ngadc, read more on Aperture Online at aperture.org/blog.
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Images: Dawoud Bey, 1. Ceala Cowan, 2. Mary Parker, 3. Braxton McKinney, 4.Lavone Thomas, 2012, from The Birmingham Project, 2012–13 © the artist and courtesy Rena Bransten Projects


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Aperture Foundation

“In Star Montana’s world, the stories and the light each mark their own time, because everyone here knows the cruelty of clocks….These photographs perform a fragile communion; it is intimacy that hurts.” –Juana María Rodríguez
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Star Montana’s (@starmontana) dreamy portraits capture the golden aura of East Los Angeles. Read more on Aperture Online at aperture.org/blog
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Image: Star Montana, Marina, East Los Angeles, 2016; Courtesy the artist


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Aperture Foundation

Saul Leiter, Walk with Soames, 1958.
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According to Saul Leiter, “the history of art is a history of color.” Photographing on the streets of Manhattan’s East Village, Leiter’s lush, Kodachrome, photographs observed the patterns and rhythms of daily life, showcasing the accidental, brief coalescence of objects and people into a harmonious pictorial composition. Read more in Color Rush: American Color Photography from Stieglitz to Sherman (Aperture/Milwaukee Art Museum, 2013), available through the link in bio.
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Image © Saul Leiter, Courtesy of Howard Greenberg Gallery


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