Allison 🌲 By the Rock and Weed@bytherockandweed

Artist // Maker in Ohio│Pyrography & Wood Slice Art│Paintings & Painted Stones│Nature & Animals│ bytherockandweed.com
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http://bytherockandweed.etsy.com/

Getting so close to finishing this pond painting! I’m putting a looooooot of hours into it and it’s definitely been a learning experience but I can’t wait to see it completed and move on to a new piece!


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Still far from finished but I’m making some progress on this piece tonight! 🐢🎨


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So happy to see some leaf buds and flowers starting to come up! I love winter but there’s something about the fresh feeling of spring and all the plants coming back that makes me feel more awake and motivated 🌻🌳🌻Here are a couple of sweet leaves in love I stumbled upon in the woods last spring 🌜🍃🌛


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Took a little break from wood-burning to paint this little northern leopard frog - he’s the beginning of larger painting I’m excited to keep working on! It’s also my first time using gouache paint and I’m hopelessly in love with it 🎨


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I’ve finally finished the fourth piece in my wood-burned endangered animals series - the North Atlantic right whale. Right whales are members of the baleen whale family - instead of teeth they have two comblike rows of long baleen plates hanging from their upper jaw. Through these plates they filter zooplankton - primarily copepods - which is their main source of food. These right whales spend their lives following a migratory path in coastal waters of the Atlantic and are usually between 45 and 60 feet long when fully grown and can weigh up to 96,000 kg. They are thought to live about 50 to 70 years - with some up to 100 - although their current life expectancy is much lower due to outside threats. On their heads are rough white patches of skin called callosities which can be used like fingerprints to identify individuals, which has helped to keep track of overall health and population size - it is estimated that only 300 to 350 North Atlantic right whales still exist today. .
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Sadly, the name “right whale” came from whalers who identified them as the “right” whale to kill when hunting - they’re slow swimmers who travel near to the coast and float when they’re killed, making them easy and convenient targets. During the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries, right whales were hunted to near extinction for oil and baleen, the latter being used for things like corsets and buggy whips. Now, although it has been illegal to hunt them since 1935, many die colliding with ships or becoming entangled in fishing equipment. Pollution in the water also makes them more susceptible to disease and affects their reproductive capabilities. Furthermore, these whales generally do not mate until they’re ten years old. Females have a gestation period of one year, only giving birth to a new calf every 4 to 6 years, which makes their overall population growth a slow process -particularly since only about 100 breeding females remain. Just this year (as their winter calving season came to a close earlier this month), it was reported that no new newborns had been seen in their calving areas.
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I finally had time to make a little progress on my next endangered species piece, the North Atlantic right whale. I’ve seen some articles cropping up over the past week about these lovely creatures because their winter breeding season is ending and no new calves have been sighted - a bad sign for a species with only about 100 breeding females remaining. The main causes of their declining population are entanglement with commercial fishing gear and fatal collision with ships. If changes aren’t made soon to protect it from such dangers, the North Atlantic right whale could be extinct by 2040.
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I’ll be finishing this wood-burned piece to share soon, along with more info about North Atlantic right whales - thanks for following along! 🐋❤️


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Seeing owl faces in freshly-cut wood slices and finding inspiration for the next endangered animal wood-burning. As much as I wanted to have a new one in the series ready to post each week, I’m having trouble finding enough time to finish them quickly enough, especially since I enjoy delving into the research about about each one and putting more detail into the wood-burned pieces than I’d originally planned. All of this to say, I’m excited to continue working on the series, but it will come along at a slower pace than I’d dreamed up. Thanks so much to anyone who’s been following along! I hope you’ll enjoy the next one 🐋
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Whale illustrations by Rudolf Freund, found in an old encyclopedia ♡


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Here is the third species in my wood-burned, endangered animal series - the Sumatran elephant. Sumatran elephants are a subspecies of the Asian elephant which is smaller than its African cousin and is also highly sociable, often living in groups of six or seven females led by the oldest - the matriarch. Elephants have the longest gestation period of any mammal at 22 months and the calves stay with their mothers for years, frequently cared for by other females in their group.
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In 2012, the Sumatran elephant was listed as a critically endangered species because half of its population and nearly 70% of its habitat had been lost or destroyed in just a single generation. Much of this is due to the deforestation caused by palm oil plantations and pulp and paper industries. This loss of habitat often compels remaining elephants to enter villages where they come into conflict with humans, frequently resulting in death on one or both sides. .
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Only the male Sumatran elephants have tusks - smaller than those of other elephants - and the poaching of the males causes an imbalance in the male/female ratio, making breeding increasingly difficult. In total, there remains an estimated 2,400 to 2,800 Sumatran elephants on the planet. .
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There is an ongoing effort to keep Sumatran elephants from extinction, with groups working to protect some of their remaining habitat, to keep the elephants away from villages, and to decrease poaching and illegal wildlife trade. Here’s to hoping they succeed.🐘❤️
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The above information about the Sumatran elephant comes from the World Wildlife Fund. To find out more, go here:
https://www.worldwildlife.org/species/sumatran-elephant .
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#sumatranelephant #savetheelephants #elephantlove #endangeredspecies #endangeredanimals #endangeredanimal #animallover @walnuthollow #walnuthollow #pyrography #woodburning #woodart


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This past week got away from me a bit so I’m still finishing up the third endangered species piece - I’m hoping to post the final piece tomorrow or Thursday! Until then, here’s a sneak peek at the work-in-progress 🐘


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Hey there! Here is the second of my wood-burned endangered animals series: the Sumatran rhinoceros. This two-horned, hairy rhino could once be found in India, Bhutan, Thailand, Myanmar, Malaysia, and possibly even Vietnam and China. Today, with less than 100 left, small populations of this critically endangered animal only exist on the islands of Sumatra and Borneo.
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One of the biggest reasons this rhino is being swiftly driven towards extinction is illegal wildlife trade and poaching. There is a large demand in many areas of Asia for the rhino horn because of its supposed medicinal qualities and there are some who keep them as ornaments, considering them a symbol of prestige and social distinction. Other reasons are an increasing lost of habitat and insufficient protection both within protected areas and without. Also, because of their devastatingly small and somewhat scattered population, the likelihood of a viable breeding pair meeting in the wild is extremely low and any long-term, significant rise in numbers is very unlikely. .
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That being said, there are groups working to protect existing populations. National parks like Bukit Barisan Selatan and Way Kambas in Sumatra, which are each home to some of the existing rhinos, have Rhino Protection Units dedicated to the safety and observation of the Sumatran rhinoceros. There’s a little hope left to save this beautiful animal 🦏💛
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The above information about the Sumatran rhino comes from the World Wildlife Fund. To find out more, go here: https://www.worldwildlife.org/species/sumatran-rhino
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#sumatranrhino #savetherhinos #endangeredanimal #endangeredspecies #animallover #woodburning #woodart #walnuthollow @walnuthollow


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Hey there! 😊 I mentioned in my last post that I’d be starting a new series soon - this is the first one 🐆 Over the course of 2018, I’ll be creating 25 wood-burnings of different endangered animals, along with a few details about each species and why their populations are struggling. I wish I could do all of them but the list of endangered species is sadly quite long.
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Which brings me to this beauty: the Amur leopard. There is estimated to be only 60 of them left in the world and their kind are listed as ‘critically endangered’. Living in the temperate forests of the Russian Far East, this rare subspecies can run up to 37 miles per hour. They’ve also been known to jump 19 feet horizontally and up to 10 feet vertically. There are a few main reasons for their dwindling numbers: they’re poached for their fur; their parts are traded illegally; their forest habitat is decreasing because of somewhat unsustainable logging; and there is insufficient prey - also caused by poaching and logging. On a brighter note, in 2012, Russia created a protected area of almost 650,000 acres which contains the Amur leopards’ breeding area and about 60% of its remaining habitat - so there’s still some hope to save this lovely leopard ❤️🐆
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The above information about the Amur leopard comes from the World Wildlife Fund. To find out more, please go here: www.worldwildlife.org/species/amur-leopard


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A little juniper magic 🌲❄️✨


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