Ciril Jazbec@ciriljazbec

National Geographic photographer / based in Slovenia / Leica Camera / Arctic stories

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Ciril Jazbec

I’m very proud I can share with you my directing debut, a video that emerged from a special opportunity to work with @anacolja , an internationally renowned model, and @volvocars. The synergies that gathered in this project from the onset have been amazing. Everyone in the team has given so much love and energy to make it happen. This Autumn we have worked hard and I’m glad we have been able to translate a personal yet universal message into a such powerful visual work. To see the full video follow link in my profile. #anacolja #volvo


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Ciril Jazbec

In Bhutan I had the privilege of witnessing something very special while staying with a local yak-herding family at their summer camp on the Masanggang mountain, at around 4,500 m above sea level. Tshering, the father of the family, performed a monthly ritual with all the male yaks, whereby he pushes them to the ground and then pours salt into their throats. The practice is thought to keep their bodies strong and Tshering takes it very seriously. It may look cruel and harsh but in reality, he and the yaks were dancing in the rain. Read the @natgeo story with a link in my profile to learn more.


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Ciril Jazbec

A solar panel used to charge mobile phones at a yak summer camp at the base of Mt. Masangang 4,500m above the sea level. Once carbon neutral Bhutan has now become the only carbon negative country in the world absorbing more carbon from the air than releasing. The climate change is disrupting the small nation’s fragile ecosystem. Even though the small nation of Bhutan is hardly responsible for most of the world's greenhouse gases, the country is responding by doubling down on its already impressive environmental regulations. Read the @natgeo story with a link in my profile to learn more.


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Ciril Jazbec

Tshering’s wife Om, 43, milks a female yak at the family summer camp at the foot of the Masanggang Glacier. Yaks are the main source of income for the family. Om is one of Tshering’s two wives – Bhutan has a tradition of polygamy. Read the @natgeo story with a link in my profile to learn more.


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Ciril Jazbec

This was one of those magical mornings. I woke up from my tent in this simply incredible scenery with Himalayan glaciers surrounding our base. Tshering’s camp sits under Mt. Masanggang, at about 4,500 m above sea level. His wife Om, 43, is taking care of female yaks. Every morning they milk most of them; some of the milk is later used to make cheese. Om’s daughter, Sangay Yangdon, is 13 and is helping her mother during her school holiday week. Read the @natgeo story with a link in my profile to learn more.


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Ciril Jazbec

It’s been exactly three years since I took the picture of a young Syrian refugee while passing through Rigonce in Slovenia. Unfortunately, the situation hasn’t improved much but only moved to the border between Bosnia and Croatia.
This Friday evening the whole series will be on show in a special group exhibition of Slovenian contemporary photography ‘If Slovenia Were’ curated by @klavdijsluban at @gradrajhenburg in Brestanica very close to the border with Croatia.
You are most kindly invited to the opening of our exhibition at 7pm. It’s exactly 1h drive away from Zagreb and Ljubljana.
The exhibition will be on view until April 21, 2019.


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Ciril Jazbec

Tshering’s camp sits under Mt. Masanggang, at about 4,500 m above sea level. Light in the tent is turned on during dinner time. Even though it’s July, it gets very cold during the night; temperatures here at 4,500 m above sea level can fall below zero degrees Celsius. The main problems faced by Tshering's family are the rapidly changing climate and wild predator attacks. More in the @natgeo story in my profile.


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Ciril Jazbec

We sat down to drink some warm yak milk after a 10h trekking to the yak summer camp at the Mt. Masangang. Tshering, the father of the family, talked about his family, his two wives, and expressed a concern about the scarcity of water resources for the future generations. Read the @natgeo story with a link in my profile to learn more.


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Ciril Jazbec

A view of the retreating Masangang Glacier at the Mt. Masangang from a yak summer camp at 4,500m above the sea level. A yak herding family moves to the camp and lives there for about five months every summer. The rest of the year they stay in the hometown of Laya in Bhutan. Tshering, the father of the family, told me that 25 years ago glaciers were very solid and numerous. He commented: “We didn't do anything but they are melting fast.” Read the @natgeo story with a link in my profile to learn more.


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Ciril Jazbec

When we first arrived at a summer yak herding camp at the base of Mt. Masangang, all I could see were female yaks, which are similar in size to European cows. It was not until the evening that the fifty-year-old yak herder, Tshering, rounded up all the male yaks.
Their sight took my breath away because these creatures seemed like they had just arrived from another planet. There was very heavy rainfall, and they were running to our camp from all possible corners of the mountain. Tshering told me to stay out of the way and be very careful with my movements.
Tshering and his family live in the camp five months a year and spend the rest in Laya. They have 20 male and 20 female yaks. While male yak is mainly used for transportation, ploughing field, clothing and tents, the female yak is mainly intended for milk. Read @natgeo story with a link in my profile to learn more.


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Ciril Jazbec

Yak herder Tshering and his son Karma are leading a caravan from the village of Laya, the highest settlement in the country, to Gasa, a valley town that is two days of walking away. They use horses and mules to carry the bags with their equipment and goods for trading. Follow link in my profile to read @natgeo story published earlier this year.


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Ciril Jazbec

Fifteen-year-old Karma is a 7th-grader in Laya. Unlike his father Tshering, who is a yak herder, Karma wants to be an engineer and work in Bhutan’s capital, Thimphu. / Twelve-year-old Chini on the second photo is a 4th-grader in Laya. She is on the way to welcome her uncle monk from Gasa. She wants to become a nurse and help women in her villlage.
Read more in @natgeo story following link in my profile.


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