Everyday Climate Change@everydayclimatechange

Climate Change is Real! A diverse group of photographers from 6 continents document climate change. Share your photos with #everydayclimatechange.

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Photo by Amnon Gutman @gutmanen for @everydayclimatechange
A refugee from Afghanistan lighting a fire during early hours of a very hot spring day, near the Greek-Macedonian border.
Even under an intermediate scenario, the Greek mainland in 2071-2100 would, compared to now, have some 35-40 more days with a maximum daily temperature of 35 C or more, while even greater would be the increase (by around 50 at the national level) in the number of tropical nights (when minimum temperatures do not fall below 20C). At the other end of the spectrum, the number of nights with frost is expected to drop significantly, especially in Northern Greece (by as many as 40). Changes are also expected in precipitation extremes. In Eastern Greece and NW Macedonia, the maximum amount of precipitation occurring within 3-day periods is expected to increase by as much as 30%, whereas in Western Greece it is expected to decrease by as much as 20%. By contrast, the greatest increases in drought periods are projected for the eastern part of the mainland and for Northern Crete, where 20 more drought days are expected per year in 2021-2050 and up to 40 more drought days are expected in 2071-2100.
#climatechange #globalwarming# #climatechangegreece


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Photo by Georgina Goodwin @ggkenya for @everydayclimatechange. .
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Aerial over the rice paddies and villages of south-east #Madagascar. The country is now experiencing a large fluctuation in rainfall patterns, increased temperatures, and larger severe weather events over the past few decades. These changes are not only affecting the wildlife but the Malagasy people as well. Recently, Madagascar has been showing longer dry periods and more intense downpours during the rainy season. The country is surprisingly poor for one so rich in resources, and there is virtually no road network. Here in the south it rains for 10 months of the year which makes any road that is there impassable. More severe rain and drought seasons will have severe consequences for the population who cannot move to even to get to medical facilities during the wet season, and lose most of their crops (rice) from drought during the dry season. Such local isolation means women must give birth at home and if there are any complications there is a much higher chance of the birth causing a fistula, a hole in the birth canal caused by prolonged childbirth which leaves the woman with chronic incontinence and in many cases a stillborn baby. Women who are incontinent suffering with fistula will be less likely to reach the medical facilities where corrective surgery is offered so they will suffer for longer. Creating climate and health awareness programs, better infrastructure and roads, and forest restoration projects are all things that can be done to help mitigate this trend!
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#climatechange #climatechangeisreal @fistula_foundation #globalwarming everydayclimatechange #women #myfeatureshoot #documentary #womenphotojournalism @NatGeo #natgeohub @Catchlight.io @magnumfoundation @dysturb #ReportageSpotlight #mycanon #visualsgang #canonphotos #toldwithexposure #apjd #water #poverty #ic_landscapes #river #Africa

Vangaindrano
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everydayclimatechange photo by John Novis @johnnovis for 
#everydayclimatechange
High winds and stormy seas batter the Rottingdean promenade in Sussex, South of England coast in a prelude to a second weather system coming days after the remnants of Hurricane Ophelia caused widespread disruption to Ireland, northern England and Scotland. Climate change is creating the ability for hurricanes to sustain themselves as they travel north in increasing warmer seas and is expected to be a continuing trend, putting Europe potentially in the firing line further extreme weather conditions.
#climatechange 
#climatechangeisreal
#everydayclimatechange
#everydayclimatechange
#globalwarming
#hurricanebrian
#orphelia
#nofilter

Rottingdean, East Sussex, United Kingdom
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Photo by James Whitlow Delano @jameswhitlowdelano for @everydayclimatechange

Vendors sell local produce at the weekly market in a region recovering from drought. The rains finally arrived heavier than usual in the summer of 2016, ending the worse drought in decades, but experts worried that the rains were so heavy that they might lead to crop failures. This region in the Northern Ethiopian Highland is rated by USAID as at risk of "high" to "extreme" food insecurity. Lalibela, Ethiopia
Climate scientists tell us to expect more wild swings in weather from dry to wet and back again, especially in marginal climates like the Ethiopian Highlands that depend heavily on seasonal rains. According to the UNDP, 80% of Ethiopia's workforce are employed in the agriculture sector. The arrival of the seasonal rains, failure to arrive or the arrivals of floods is a high stakes business for the Ethiopian people and climate change is introducing even greater uncertainty.

#climatechange #globalwarming #foodinsecurity #rains #flood #drought #Africa #Ethiopia #EthiopianHighl


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Photo by Will Baxter @baxpix for @everydayclimatechange

A woman cuts firewood near #Kakuma in #Turkana county, #Kenya, August 30, 2017. Turkana, Kenya's least-developed county, is experiencing what many call "the worst drought in living memory". Water shortages and lack of pastureland has driven many #pastoralists to take what remains of their herds over the border into #Uganda.
#photojournalism #Africa

#documentaryphotography #climatechange #drought #desertification #globalwarming
#migration #displacement #charcoal


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@paoloverzone: Nico Bornemann engineer of the The Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research at work on permafrost measurements,
Sar-Dakh Island Siberia.
What is permafrost?
Researchers use the term permafrost, or permanently frozen ground, when the temperature of the ground remains under zero degrees Celsius for at least two consecutive years. The material can consist of rock, sediment or soil, and can contain varying quantities of ice. In some regions of the Arctic, the makeup is 70 percent ice. Especially Northeast Siberia experienced extremely long and cold winters during the last ice ages, lasting from about 100,000 to 10,000 years ago. At the same time, the ground there was not protected by an ice sheet, and cold air deeply penetrated into the ground. As a result, the permafrost in this region reaches deep into the Earth – extending as far as 1.7 kilometres down. Most permafrost landscapes can be recognised by the typical patterning of their surface, for example polygons, formed by repeated deep freezing in winter. The very cold Arctic winter temperatures cause the frozen soils to contract across the land surface, resulting in a regular pattern of cracks much like drying cracks. Subsequently, the centimetre-wide and meter-deep cracks are then filled with snow melt water during the spring thaw. Thanks to the soil’s intense cold, the water then refreezes, creating vertical veins of ice that grow over decades to millennia into ice wedges.

#awi #permafrost #siberia #russia#climatechange #globalwarming


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everydayclimatechange photo by John Novis @johnnovis for 
#everydayclimatechange
The British Airways i360 observation tower is seen against a darkened sky in the middle of the afternoon on Brighton Seafront, Sussex, UK. Extreme weather caused by climate change has forced hurricane Ophelia, originating in the Azores northwards, dragging tropical air from the Sahara with it. The met office claimed a mixture of forest fires in Iberia and Saharan dust, have sent debris into the air causing the dust to be dragged high in the atmosphere.
#climatechange 
#climatechangeisreal
#everydayclimatechange
#everydayclimatechange
#globalwarming
#ophelia
#nofilter

Brighton and Hove Seafront
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Photo by Monirul Alam @meghmonir for @everydayclimatechange~ Bangladesh, Gaibandha October 2016 - Rupali Begum, 20 years old, with her two baby takes poses for photos in front of her father’s houses in Gaibandha Sadar Upazila, where she live. When she read in class seven she was married due to an economic problem. She was not wanted as early married but her family to do it for the reality. She said, married girl suffer many complication, like me. She lives with her father’s house. Her husband works abroad. She takes care her two baby's, household works. Some time she try to swing works for money to support her family. Rupali also said, During the rainy season sometimes over flooded their homes and displayed them,than they face lot of problem.In Bangladesh has one of the highest rates of early marriage in the world. Almost two-thirds of the women between 20 and 24 were married before the age 18, according to a national survey by Plan Bangladesh and ICDDR,B in 2013.

Climate change is arguably one of the largest threats to global development and security. When we think about climate change, we might picture rising sea levels, scarce resources and natural disasters. But climate change is also driving rates of child marriage around the world.Floods, droughts and natural disasters have forced thousands of farmers in rural Bangladesh out of work by destroying their crops, livestock and homes. Many of these families choose to migrate to Dhaka in search of employment where the costs of living are much higher.

The negative impact of child marriage is acknowledge worldwide and consequently there are a host of policies and programmers that focus strongly on its prevention.Young married girls are more likely to drop out of school and consequently, miss opportunities in gainful employment later in life. Teenage pregnancy, before the age of physical maturity, increases the risk of birth complications and giving birth to a low-birth-weight baby, which is closely linked to child stunting. Climate Change is my long-term project where I began to document of marginal condition in my own country of Bangladesh. ©️ Monirul Alam / WITNESS PHOTO
#climatechange #bangladesh#child


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Photo by Georgina Goodwin @ggkenya for @everydayclimatechange.
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Women from the Mkombezi Rice Scheme in Malawi's south Chikwawa region carve out irrigation channels for rice and maize seeds with home-made wooden hoes and their bare hands. They worked for hours in the hot sun without a break, some as old as 75. Each plants and harvests just 0.3ha. The 2015 and 2016 rains failed in Malawi, it left 2.8 million people food insecure because of drought and flooding according to the World Food Programme. Now in 2017 around 6.7 million people, roughly half of Malawi's rural population, are in need of food assistance says FEMS NET (Famine Early Warning System Network).
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Climate change is posing many challenges in Malawi where 84% are rural people who depend on the rain for subsistence farming. Women make up 70% of the agricultural workforce and remain the largest proportion of the poor. Social and cultural gender roles and responsibilities, and limited access to resources means women in rural Africa continue to be the most vulnerable to the impacts of climate change.
Assignment for @catholicreliefservices. Check out my instagram story 👆for more beautiful images from this story about how coming together we can overcome the effects of climate change! .
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#climatechange #globalwarming #documentary #womeninphotojournalism #womenempowerment
#farming #ourplanetdaily #feedfeed #commontable #myfeatureshoot #rural #Malawi #foodsecurity #liveauthentic #followmetoo #mycanon #earthfocus #visualsoflife #mycanon #ReportageSpotlight @catchlight.io @gettyreportage #apjd @leonardodicaprio

Chikwawa District
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Photographs by @paolopatrizi for @everydayclimatechange

In the late 1990s, Lake Urmia, in north-western Iran, was twice as large as Luxembourg and the largest salt-water lake in the Middle East. Since then it has shrunk substantially, and was sliced in half in 2008, with consequences uncertain to this day, by a 15-km causeway designed to shorten the travel time between the cities of Urmia and Tabriz. Historically, the lake attracted migratory birds including flamingos, pelicans, ducks and egrets. Its drying up, or desiccation, is undermining the local food web, especially by destroying one of the world’s largest natural habitats of the brine shrimp Artemia, a hardy species that can tolerate salinity levels of 340 grams per litre, more than eight times saltier than ocean water. Effects on humans are perhaps even more complicated. The tourism sector has clearly lost out. While the lake once attracted visitors from near and far, some believing in its therapeutic properties, Urmia has turned into a vast salt-white barren land with beached boats serving as a striking image of what the future may hold.

Desiccation will increase the frequency of salt storms that sweep across the exposed lakebed, diminishing the productivity of surrounding agricultural lands and encouraging farmers to move away. Poor air, land, and water quality all have serious health effects including respiratory and eye diseases .

The results of an investigation, which recently appeared in the Journal of Great Lakes Research, revealed that in September 2014 the lake’s surface area was about 12% of its average size in the 1970s, a far bigger fall than previously realised. The research undermines any notion of a crisis caused primarily by climate changes. It shows that the pattern of droughts in the region has not changed significantly, and that Lake Urmia survived more severe droughts in the past.

#climatechange#globalwarming#extremeweather#everydayclimatechange#climatechangeisreal #drought #Iran


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@paoloverzone : Night arrival at the Arctic research station Samoylov island together with the participants of the Russian-German Lena expedition 2017.
The research station island Samoylov offers Russian and German researchers the possibility to examine the permafrost in the Lena Delta (Siberia) and to draw conclusions in regard to past and current climate events.
The base Samoylov Island is situated on the eponymous island in the Lena Delta. Located in the northeast of Siberia, the delta extends over 150 kilometres into the Laptev Sea and represents one of Russia’s largest conservation areas. The region is crucial to understanding the processes at work in the permafrost of the Siberian Arctic, making it a natural magnet for the researchers. #climatechange #environment #globalwarming #permafrost #siberia #russia


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