George Steinmetz@geosteinmetz

Photographer for National Geographic and NY Times Magazine, creating an aerial perspective on climate change and global food supply @feedtheplanet

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/08/04/insider/photographing-climate-change.html

Shanghai traffic at rush hour. If 1.3 billion people in China adopt the same transportation and energy consumption habits as the United States, the impact on our planet will be staggering.
This video was part of an extraordinary project for the NYTimes Magazine documenting the effects of climate change on all seven continents. @NYTMag @pulitzercenter #LosingEarth #climatechange


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The dinghy of @oceanexpeditions pushing through the slush of calving glaciers while surveying the bathymetry around Brabant Island, Antarctica. The West Antarctic Peninsula is one of the most rapidly warming areas on earth, with rapid loss of ice.

This video was part of an extraordinary project documenting the effects of climate change on all seven continents for the New York Times Magazine. @NYTMag @pulitzercenter #LosingEarth #climatechange @simo_oceanphotography


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Partially burned athletic fields of Cardinal Newman High School after a wildfire swept through Santa Rosa, California on 10.10.2017.
Although the cause of the Tubbs Fire is still under investigation, early reports indicated that it was caused by 80 mph winds that pushed power lines into trees. Many years of severe drought left many trees dead, and the wet winter the previous year created an abundance of grass for fueling the fire.
This photo was taken for an extraordinary special issue of last Sunday’s New York Times Magazine devoted to a single story by Nathaniel Rich revealing the lost opportunity we had to limit the impacts of climate change. Over the course of the past year, I was sent to every continent to take aerial photographs of the effects of our inaction. @NYTMag @pulitzercenter #LosingEarth #climatechange


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A thick layer of green algae covers the surface of China’s Lake Tai, which thickens around the pavilions and shoreline walkways of an unfinished tourist attraction. Thirty years ago the waters of China’s third largest lake were clear of algae, but rising water temperatures and nitrogen-rich runoff from both cities and agriculture have turned its surface into a slime that looks like pea soup.

Over the course of the past year, I was sent to every continent to photograph the effects of climate change for last week’s special issue of the New York Times Magazine. @NYTMag @pulitzercenter #LosingEarth #climatechange


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The suburbs of Nouakchott, the capital of Mauritania, are fighting a losing battle agains windblown sand. Nouakchott was a small village in 1958 when it was selected to be the future nation's capital, but droughts and increasing desertification since the 1970s have displaced a vast number of Mauritanians who resettled in Nouakchott, which now has, some 40% of the desert country's population. With no power or plumbing systems, the water is delivered once a week by truck, with each family getting 50 gallons of drinking water to carry home. Local residents complained about the moving sand, which has been getting worse since this community was created seven years earlier.
This photo is part of a special issue of last weekend’s New York Times Magazine devoted to a single story by Nathaniel Rich revealing the lost opportunity we had to limit the impacts of climate change. Over the course of the past year, I was sent to every continent to take aerial photographs of the effects of our inaction. @NYTMag @pulitzercenter #LosingEarth #climatechange


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31 August 2017, the day after Hurricane Harvey hit Beaumont, Texas, and dumped 30 inches of rain on Port Arthur in 18 hours. For this flat, low-lying community, there was simply nowhere for the rain water to go. Warmer sea water from our changing climate is causing tropical storms to be more wet and powerful, and the extraordinary is becoming more commonplace.

This photo is part of a special issue of last weekend’s New York Times Magazine devoted to a single story by Nathaniel Rich revealing the lost opportunity we had to limit the impacts of climate change. Over the course of the past year, I was sent to every continent to take aerial photographs of the effects of our inaction. @NYTMag @pulitzercenter #LosingEarth #climatechange


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The Trift Bridge in Switzerland spans a chasm that was filled with 100 ft. of ice just twenty years ago, making this one of the fastest retreating ice fields in the Alps. The chasm now has to be crossed by the 550 ft. long foot bridge. Behind it is a newly created lake, with the remnant of the Trift Glacier up high in the background. By the end of the 21st century, scientists predict that most of central Switzerland’s glaciers will have disappeared.

This photo was part of an extraordinary special issue of last Sunday’s New York Times Magazine devoted to a single story by Nathaniel Rich, revealing the lost opportunity we had to limit the impacts of climate change. Over the course of the past year, I was sent to every continent to take aerial photographs of the effects of our inaction. @NYTMag @pulitzercenter #LosingEarth #climatechange


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Wildfires are spreading into areas once considered safe, like this suburb of Santa Rosa, California. Houses in Coffey Park were burned to their foundation last October by a fast spreading wildfire fanned by strong winds three days earlier. The fires are thought to have been caused by 80mph winds that pushed dead tree limbs into power lines. Years of severe drought left many trees dead, and the wet winter the previous year created an abundance of grass for fueling the fire, creating perfect conditions for the fast moving fire.

This photo is part of an extraordinary special issue of last Sunday’s New York Times Magazine devoted to a single story by Nathaniel Rich revealing the lost opportunity we had to limit the impacts of climate change. Over the course of the past year, I was sent to every continent to take aerial photographs of the effects of our inaction. @NYTMag @pulitzercenter #LosingEarth #climatechange


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Passengers arriving at the flooded dock of a small island in the Brahmaputra Delta in Bangladesh that is becoming increasingly uninhabitable. This area is flooded on an almost annual basis by tropical storms. The primary crop here is rice, which can be planted only once annually when outgoing flood waters turn the delta water fresh to irrigate the rice. Because sea surface temperatures in the Bay of Bengal have increased significantly, scientists believe Bangladesh has suffered some of the fastest sea-level rises in the world. They project at least a five-foot rise by 2100, which would displace 50 million people.
This photo was part of an extraordinary special issue of yesterday’s New York Times Magazine devoted to a single story by Nathaniel Rich revealing the lost opportunity we had to limit the impacts of climate change. Over the course of the past year, I was sent to every continent to take aerial photographs of the effects of our inaction. @NYTMag @pulitzercenter #LosingEarth #climatechange


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Chinstrap penguin colonies in Antarctica are being decimated by climate change. This colony on Deception Island has seen numbers go from 85,000 nests in 2003 to 53,000 today. Warming ocean temperatures have led to a decline in krill, their principal food, which depends on abundant sea ice.
This photo is part of an extraordinary special issue of this week’s New York Times Magazine devoted to a single story by Nathaniel Rich revealing the lost opportunity we had to limit the impact of climate change. Over the course of the past year, I was sent to every continent to take aerial photographs of the effects of our inaction. @NYTMag @pulitzercenter #LosingEarth #climatechange #oceanites @oceanexpeditions . To read the back story on this most extraordinary project, and see how this picture was taken, go to link in bio.


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Marine biologists studying seagrass in Shark Bay, Western Australia, which the has been damaged by warming sea water. Marine heat waves have killed off over 1,000 sq km of seagrass here since 2011. Seagrass forms the primary habitat and food for dugongs, turtles, and many fishes. Current climate models predict that these marine heat waves will only increase in frequency.

This photo is part of an extraordinary special issue of this week’s New York Times Magazine devoted to a single story by Nathaniel Rich revealing the lost opportunity we had to limit the impacts of climate change. Over the course of the past year, I was sent to every continent to take aerial photographs of the effects of our inaction. @NYTMag @pulitzercenter #LosingEarth #climatechange. To read about the making of these pictures see link in bio.


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The ancient oasis town of Chinguetti in Mauritania is slowly being buried by mobile sand dunes, a problem accelerated by increasingly intensive sandstorms that have deposited 20-40 inches of sand over the past 15 years.
This photo is part of an extraordinary special issue of this week’s New York Times Magazine devoted to a single story by Nathaniel Rich revealing the lost opportunity we had to limit the impacts of climate change. Over the course of the past year, I was sent to every continent to take aerial photographs of the effects of our inaction. @NYTMag @pulitzercenter #LosingEarth #climatechange


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