George Steinmetz@geosteinmetz

Photographer for National Geographic and NY Times Magazine, creating an aerial perspective on climate change and global food supply @feedtheplanet

georgesteinmetz.com/about/bio/

857 posts 740,190 followers 401 following

George Steinmetz

Spring in The Netherlands... not too shabby! With thanks to @toalaolivares for the heli ride


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George Steinmetz

Dune heights in China's in the Badain Jaran desert average 1,200 ft. making them perhaps the world’s tallest. Between the dunes are lakes saltier than seawater surrounded by shallow fresh water springs. The lakes are slowly evaporating, and the way of life for Mongolian herders in the area is disappearing as well. In 2001 it took thirty bactrian camels and ten horses to access this roadless area with all our gear and scientific team, but the motorized paragliding was extraordinary! #notadrone #oldschool #exploration #paramotor @natgeo #DesertAirBook


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George Steinmetz

Recreational spelunkers climbing out of 162 ft. deep Neversink Pit, a limestone sink hole that harbors rare and endangered species of ferns. The cave is an extraordinary example of grass-roots conservation that is owned and managed by the #SouthEasternCaveConservancy to preserve it for future generations. @scci_caves #caving #spelunking #conservation #biodiversity


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George Steinmetz

It took me a few days to cross South Sudan by train in 1982. The price was right up on the roof, if you didn’t roll off in your sleep. Getting some privacy during toilet stops was a definite challenge, and you had to be quick or be left behind. I brought a camera with me as I thought I might find things like I grew up seeing on the pages of @natgeo. #oldschool #autodidact #AfricanAirBook


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George Steinmetz

The rain had just stopped when I took this photo of the coal sorting yard near Tuoketuo, China’s biggest coal-fired power plant in Inner Mongolia. The yard is about 2km long, and supplies the fuel for about 1/3 of Beijing's electricity. While China leads the world in installed wind and solar power, coal still supplies a 3/4 of electrical needs. #LosingEarth


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George Steinmetz

World Champion paramotor pilot Alain Arnoux exploring the mega dunes of the Dasht-e Lut basin in Iran. They say it's one of the hottest places on earth, but there was nobody out there with a thermometer. #hyperarid #sandtrap #nowimps #DesertAirBook


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George Steinmetz

Once mortal enemies, still fierce competitors, Asmat people from neighboring villages race dugout canoes on the Pomatsj River, Papua, Indonesia, circa 1993. Today the tribes of Papua find themselves fighting for cultural survival as Indonesia pushes ahead to assimilate its last frontier. #Asmat #Papua #Anthropology


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George Steinmetz

Early spring has its subtle beauty, as the leaf buds begin to emerge on trees around the bandshell in Central Park, NYC. To see more, check out @NewYorkAirBook #Gotham


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George Steinmetz

It takes a lot of work to maintain the vegetable gardens of Timbuktu, on the edge of the Sahara Desert in Mali. Water has to be drawn by hand pump and then carried by the head load to fertilized plots set out in the sand. #farming #oldschool #paramotor #AfricanAirBook


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George Steinmetz

Village boys in South Sudan having a pick-up game of soccer, with stones for goal posts and a rubbish-filled bag for a football. The rules are simple, the game is not. #futbol #soccer #football#GOAL


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George Steinmetz

Zebra congregate near the last remaining waterhole of the Makgadikgadi Pans before they begin their annual migration to the Boteti River, Botswana. @meno_a_kwena #paraglider #AfricanAirBook


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George Steinmetz

I found this freeze-dried carcass of a weddell seal in Antarctica’s Dry Valleys, some 20 mi from the coast at an elevation of 1500 ft.. Scientists don't know why the seals wriggle up the Dry Valleys to die, but presume it's caused by mental illness, as there is no food or way for them to survive there. The dry climate preserves the carcasses for thousands of years, and they are eventually sand-blasted apart by katabatic winds in excess of 100mph. With thanks to the NSF for letting me explore the frozen desert for #desertairbook


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