Jodi Cobb@jodicobbphoto

National Geographic photographer || Speaker || Author: Geisha

http://www.jodicobb.com/

131 posts 65,880 followers 260 following

Back where I belong.


7

To really appreciate the earth, especially on #EarthDay, it’s often best to see it from above. The Italian island of Burano is in the same lagoon as Venice, and is an astonishing sight with nearly 3000 people crowded into its vibrantly colored houses. Legend has it that they were painted so vividly so the fishermen could spot them through the fog. Now if the residents want to change the color, they have to choose from a list of government-approved hues. @natgeo @thephotosociety #venetianlagoon #Burano
Want to have your #EarthDay photo published on NatGeo.com? Add #NatgeoEarthDay to your images, then check NatGeo.com on Earth Day, April 22nd.


11

Fifth avenue, New York City, tonight. @stuartweitzman


27

Just another airport ... Detroit, just passing through...


7

Merle Haggard, Nashville 1976. Country music legend, died Wednesday on his 79th birthday. R.I.P. @merlehaggardofficial #merlehaggard


13

For a National Geographic story on the science of love, I explored what scientists say are the three stages: lust (anyone will do); romantic obsession (only one person will do); and long-term attachment (why couples stay together for decades). Somewhere around Stage 2 comes marriage, at least in some cultures, and everyone hopes that’s the beginning of Stage 3. With the divorce rate in the US hovering between forty and fifty percent, that isn’t always the case, but hope springs eternal. I’ve photographed weddings all over the world, as they are usually among the most joyous events in a person’s life and the best party in the village. But a mass wedding in Taiwan where 100 couples tied the knot was unique-- and tiring. #love


20

Spring break, Cancun, Mexico 2006. Pool party.


15

Cancun, Mexico 2006. For a National Geographic story on the science of love, I explored what scientists say are the three stages: lust (anyone will do); romantic obsession (only one person will do); and long-term attachment (why couples stay together for decades). Spring break in Cancun seemed a perfect place to start. #springbreak @thephotosociety @natgeo


40

Growing up in the brothels of Mumbai, India. Girls born to women trapped in the sex industry traditionally had little hope of escaping their mothers' fate, but various organizations are working hard to change that by educating the girls and providing them with options and choices. Huge numbers of women are lured, sold, tricked—and born—into the commercial sex trade worldwide. Human trafficking remains one of the largest criminal activities in the world, with an estimated 27 million people held in bondage: bought and sold against their will, held captive, brutalized and exploited for profit. The only good news is that people are becoming more aware, more able to recognize situations that previously had gone unnoticed, and are organizing to help. Please find a way to do something. @natgeo @thephotosociety


90

Because every day should be Women’s Day, a reminder that women are often the most vulnerable to human trafficking. A woman trapped in a brothel on Falkland Road, Mumbai, India—the woman is in the cage, the bird is free, the irony is heartbreaking. Huge numbers of women are lured, sold and tricked into the commercial sex industry worldwide. Human trafficking remains one of the world's most intractable and horrific problems—even more so today than when I took on a year-long project on the issue in 2003. To illuminate the plight of an estimated 27 million people held in slavery worldwide, I went to 12 countries where I witnessed unspeakable horrors. Although many women enter the sex industry willingly, they often have no idea what is in store, and don’t expect to become enslaved. @natgeo @thephotosociety


86

To honor International Women’s Day, a reminder that women are often the most vulnerable to human trafficking. Brick kiln workers in India are held in debt bondage for generations. Owners lend the workers money for an emergency like a medical problem or a funeral, then charge outrageous interest rates so the debts can never be repaid and are passed on to their children. Human trafficking remains one of the world's most intractable and horrific problems—even more so today than when I took on a year-long project on the issue in 2003. To illuminate the plight of an estimated 27 million people held in slavery worldwide, I went to 12 countries where I witnessed unspeakable horrors. The story got the biggest response in the history of National Geographic until then, but not much has changed. The stoicism on this woman’s face humbles me.
@thephotosociety @natgeo


41

Flying in to Madison WI for my presentation "Stranger in a Strange Land" tomorrow night at the National Geographic Live series at the Overture Center for the Arts. Please come if you're around! @thephotosociety @natgeolive


11

Snow day, Washington DC. For my commission from JBG property group to document U Street Corridor. @thephotosociety @natgeo


23

Koi pond, Sea Island, GA. iPhone. @thephotosociety


36

Feeling bad that I've been snowed out of my home in Washington DC, so photographed the ice in my water glass in Florida today. Looks cold.


8

Women of Vision exhibition opens at Orlando Museum of Art. Please stop by and see the amazing work of 11 National Geographic photographers who just happen to be women! #womenofvision @natgeo


8

Glenn Frey, The Eagles, 1972. RIP. #Glennfrey #Eagles #heartachetonight


5

Human trafficking remains one of the world's most intractable and horrific problems—even more so today than when I took on a year-long project on the issue in 2003. To illuminate the plight of an estimated 27 million people held in bondage worldwide, I went to 12 countries where I witnessed unspeakable horrors. The story got the biggest response in the history of National Geographic until then, but my efforts to publish the work in book form failed. No publisher wanted to take on the challenge. I'm still trying, and still heartbroken from the stories of the victims and survivors. Here, a baby in extreme danger of being sold into the illegal adoption trade, one of the many forms of trafficking.


301

Unpublished #frommyarchives. Moments after birth in #Botswana. #elephant


36

From the archive: perfect timing to find this panda. On the heels of @AmiVitale's wonderful talk at @NatGeo last week. So good to see Ami's pictures of the progress of pandas in China since I made this picture in the same area 34 years ago. Chengdu zoo in Sichuan Province.


69

Experimenting. Rain on a pedicab window last night in New York City. Reflecting the trees wrapped in lights for the holidays. Wonderful time to be in the city. #newyorkcity @thephotosociety @natgeo


21

New York in the rain today. @thephotosociety #Newyork


14

Throwback Thanksgiving. For my National Geographic story on Broadway years ago, I convinced the manager of the Marriot Marquis to have his engineer remove the entire window from its frame to get this new angle on #macysthanksgivingdayparade. Before the "cleanup" of Times Square. Happy thanksgiving!


21

Beautiful post on National Geographic's Proof blog this morning. Seven colleagues, each with over 30 years at the magazine, posted their favorite photographs in NG's history. Moved by Cathy Newman's words about this photograph of Ella Eronen -- and this is why I've loved working with Cathy all these years.
Read the rest of her piece and the six others -- link in profile. "It was taken on assignment for a story on Helsinki and the subject—Ella Eronen, one of Finland’s most beloved actresses—greeted Jodi at the door and told her to wait while she put on the costume of “Madame,” an actress who felt lost unless she had a role to play. It was her most famous role, and that’s the portrait we see hanging on the wall. Eronen moved around and posed with great drama until finally, needing to catch a breath, she sat down and lifted a mirror to check her makeup.

That was when Jodi snapped the frame—and captured a small, sharp narrative of age seeking to recapture youth. It’s all there in one image. The gold clock relentlessly ticking. The portrait of her younger self, gazing down, perhaps, with gentle irony. And the mirror reflecting—what? Vanity, surely. But also, I think, wistful longing." - Cathy Newman, Years at National Geographic: 37


31

Surprise at end of editing first 600 rolls of film for my retrospective...had no memory of being onstage with Steven Tyler in 1978. Those pants...@iamstevent #whatalongstrangetrip #archivedive


16

So it begins....thousands of rolls of film to edit for my retrospective book. Every journey begins with a single step--or yellow box. Archive archeology. #garrettbox


11

Celebrating the way cool Deanne Fitzmaurice who has finally made a camera bag for us girls. Launch at penthouse party in NYC during #photoplusexpo #thinktankphoto #deannefitzmaurice #lilydeanne


12

Flying in to San Francisco airport for NG Live speaking engagement at Fox Theater in Redwood City tonight. Hope my SF friends can come!


12

Chris Squire, bassist and co-founder of the band Yes, in 1974. RIP.
Music was my passion then, and most of my friends were musicians. I didn't have any talent that I could discern, so photography became my passport to that world. I photographed many of the great bands of the time, and was given access that is mostly unthinkable today. It was a magic time in both music and photography. @thephotosociety #rip #chrissquire #yes #music #rocknroll #blackandwhite #band


9

Photo by Jodi Cobb @jodiCobbphoto. An oxpecker perches on a giraffe's head in Botswana, from an assignment on global warming for National Geographic a couple years back. So many unpublished photographs through the years. @thephotosociety @natgeo #wildlife #nature #africa


18