Juan Arredondo@juanarre

Latest work https://t.co/ypU5jdAvYh

http://www.juanarredondo.com/

371 posts 35,077 followers 712 following

Willya Hernández sleeps on the streets with her 2-year-old daughter. Every day she is taunted by locals and begs for food to survive, even selling her hair so her toddler can eat. But she says it's still better than what she's running from in Venezuela. This is her story, along with of dozens of others we met in Cucuta. “I need an angel,” Ms. Hernández said, holding back tears at 1 a.m. on a humid recent night. “We can’t go back, and we can’t stay here.” @nytimes -
It has been overwhelming the response from readers who want to help Willya and her family reach their destination. We are doing our best to track her down. This story has struck a chord with me, especially it is hard to hear that most of these refugees feel unwelcome by Colombians. My family was part of the Colombian diaspora abroad. They were welcomed in the US and given the opportunity to thrive, just as millions of Colombians have done elsewhere. Sure, we have a few bad apples and we have certainly paid the price for them, we are not all drug traffickers. Just as not all Venezuelans are thieves or murders as many have unfailrly labeled them. Still, we were given the opportunity to start a new life, a family, and a promising future in other places.

I'm dumbfounded to hear relatives, friends, colleagues, and people of the street discriminate our fellow neighbors from Venezuela. This situation has to be seen for what it is: a humanitarian crisis. We have to go beyond the poisons political discourse we are undergoing in Colombia. This is about being kind to one another. No one should be forced to sleep on the streets with their child, or go a day hungry and certainly be forced to bathe in raw sewage. Most of the Venezuelans we meet during this reportage, do not want to stay in Colombia, they want to reach Ecuador, Chile, Peru; countries that have open their borders to this crisis. -

I hope these images can help rethink your position on the current situation of our fellow Venezuelans and their predicament.

Link to article @nytimes
https://t.co/ypU5jdAvYh

#venezuela #cucuta #colombia #refugees #humanitariancrisis #withrefugees

Cúcuta, Norte de Santander
87

Venezuelas lining up in Cúcuta to collect a meal giving by a nonprofict good pantry.
In Colombia border town, desperate Venezuelas flee an economic crisis and rampant crime, just to arrive to unwelcome stay from locals.

Recent contribution on today's @nytimes with the tireless reporting of @joeparkdan
https://www.nytimes.com/2018/02/17/world/americas/venezuela-crisis-colombia-migration.html#click=https://t.co/ypU5jdAvYh

Cúcuta, Norte de Santander
31

Happy to see our story 'Peace Football Club' shot for @espn nominated for a @worldpressphoto sports story category.

In April 12 I'll travel to Amsterdam to know the winners of each category, good luck to my fellow nominees.

#photojournalism #documentaryphotography @gettyreportage @verbatimphoto
https://www.worldpressphoto.org/collection/photo/2018/sports/juan-d-arredondoo

Colombia
16

#Repost @natgeo with @get_repost
・・・
Photograph by @juanarre (Juan Arredondo)
A resident of the neighborhood La Loma, on the outskirts of the city of Cartagena, gets a haircut by a street barber.
The neighborhood has a reputation for being one of the most dangerous of the city, but its residents have seen a drop in crime rates in recent years. The city of Cartagena has seen a boom in tourism which according to the government has risen 250 percent since 2016. Still, La Loma and other neighborhoods are off-limits for most tourist.

Follow me @juanarre to see more about the challenges and changes Colombia is undergoing. #postconflict #thehealingofcolombia #dailylife #peace #Colombia #peaceprocess #Cartagena #LaLoma

Cartagena De Indias, Colombia
20

#Repost @natgeo with @get_repost
・・・
Photograph by @juanarre for @natgeo
Esperanza Medina, 40, holds her daughter Desiree Paz, at a transitional Zone in La Guajira, Colombia.

After 26 years of fighting for Colombia's resistance movement, Esperanza traded in her uniform for life as a mother.

Esperanza joined the FARC group when she was 14 and had her first child at 16, but FARC commanders forced her to give up the baby for adoption. She subsequently underwent seven abortions, but now that the fighting is over, she hopes to be able to raise Desiree herself.

Esperanza named her Daugher Desiree Paz (Desire for peace) a mix of French and Spanish name, for her wish to raise her daughter in a peaceful country.

I've been documenting Esperanza's reintegration for the past 12 months.Follow the link to read more about this ongoing project:
Former FARC Rebel Discovers Hope and Peace in Motherhood
https://t.co/1iEclHJoiJ

#FARC #demobilized #peacetalks #photojournalism #natgeo #hope #peace #reintigration #formerrebels #childsoldiers

La Guajira, Colombia
21

#Repost @natgeo with @get_repost
・・・
Photograph by @juanarre (Juan Arredondo)

Dawn calisthenics starts the day for members of two FARC “fronts” in November 2016. Women have made up about a third of FARC’s fighters.

In early 2017, 26 transitional and normalization zones were built to help an estimated 7,000 fighters transition into civilian life. Preparations are still under way for the massive reintegration, which was set to begin last year.
According to a recent report by the UN peacekeeping mission, around 40% of demobilized fighters have left the transitional zones due to security concerns and the lack of progress in the implementation of the reintegration programs. The report also expresses great concern for the growing number of murders of social leaders, promoters of coca substitution and former members of FARC in recent months.

Image shot for this month's issue of @natgeo 'The healing of Colombia' with text by Alma Guillermoprieto. Follow me @juanarre to see more about the changes Colombia is undergoing.

#colombia #farcdemobilization#demobilization #peace #peaceprocess

Caqueta, Colombia
24

#Repost @natgeo with @get_repost
・・・
Photo: @juanarre (Juan Arredondo)

Claudia Joana Cruz (22) stepped on a landmine in 2013 while she was returning from a field trip on the countryside in Cauca. From that day she recalls: “I lost consciousness after the blast and they told me later I was losing a lot of blood. The reason they had to amputate so high was due to the infection. It took almost five hours until I was finally given medical assistance."
More than 11,400 people have been injured or killed by landmines since 1990. Uncleared minefields remain an obstacle to development and resettlement in areas of Colombia.
A peace accord has ended the fighting but the countryside is littered with land mines and criminal gangs are growing reclaiming territories left by FARC demobilized rebels. Deming is one of the challenges this hopeful nation faces after five decades of Civil War.
Shot on assignment this month's issue of @natgeo 'The healing of Colombia' with text by Alma Guillermoprieto. Follow me @juanarre to see more about the challenges and changes Colombia is undergoing.
#postconflict #thehealingofcolombia #dailylife #peace #Colombia #peaceproces #landmines #medellin #nevergiveup

Medellín, Antioquia
50

#Repost @natgeo with @get_repost
・・・
Photo: @juanarre (Juan Arredondo)

A pit full is plastic balls at La Octava bar typifies Medellin’s growing nightlife and tourists appeal. It’s a dramatic change from the violent days under Escobar’s Medellín cartel, which at its height brought in as much as four billion dollars a year in cocaine trade.
It's a dramatic change from the violent days under Escobar's Medellin Cartel, which brought the city to be the most dangerous city in the world at one point.

After 52 years of internal conflict, this hopeful nation seek a lasting peace and new opportunities.

Shot on assignment this month's issue of @natgeo 'The healing of Colombia' with text by Alma Guillermoprieto. To see more about Colombia or to learn more about the changes that are taking place. Follow me @juanarre on instragram

#colombia #peaceprocess #medellin #almaguillermoprieto #postconflict #photooftheday #everedaylatinamerica

Medellín, Antioquia
46

In February 2000, when members of a paramilitary group massacred townspeople in El Salado, one victim was Miguel Ángel Contreras. His father, Jesús Contreras, has not visited El Salado since. Now 86, blind, and deaf, he lives with his daughter in Shot on assignment this month's issue of @natgeo 'The healing of Colombia' with text by Alma Guillermoprieto.
To see more about Colombia or to learn more about the changes that are taking place.
Follow me @juanarre on instragram

#colombia #peaceprocess #medellin #almaguillermoprieto #postconflict #photooftheday #everedaylatinamerica

Cartagena De Indias, Colombia
18

So long Cuba! You will always have a special place in my heart #cuba #havana #onassignment #travel #oldcars #chevy

José Martí International Airport
10

#Repost @natgeo (@get_repost)
・・・
Photograph by @juanarre (Juan Arredondo)

Tourist and visitors enjoy the panoramic view from the rooftop of a Hotel located in the exclusive neighborhood of El Poblado in Medellin typifies the growing nightlife and appeal of the city. It's a dramatic change from the violent days under Escobar's Medellin Cartel, which brought the city to be the most dangerous city in the world at one point.

After 52 years of internal conflict, this hopeful nation seek a lasting peace and new opportunities.

Shot on assignment this month's issue of @natgeo 'The healing of Colombia' with text by Alma Guillermoprieto. To see more about Colombia or to learn more about the changes that are taking place. Follow me @juanarre on instragram

#colombia #peaceprocess #medellin #almaguillermoprieto #postconflict #photooftheday #everedaylatinamerica

Medellín, Antioquia
70

Loading...