Museum of Arts and Design@madmuseum

MAD champions artists, designers, and artisans, presenting contemporary art and design through a craft lens.

www.madmuseum.org/

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Museum of Arts and Design

Damien Davis’ (@damiendavis) practice explores historical representations of blackness by seeking to unpack the visual language of cultures both domestic and abroad, questioning how cultures code and decode representations of race through craft, design, and digital modes of production. His work is rooted in an ongoing project to establish a growing visual lexicon made out of a discrete iconography. Ultimately, Davis is developing a personal language of discourse by amassing, curating, and strategically deploying individual icons into various assemblages and objects.

During his residency at MAD, Davis is working on growing a new body of work focused on waiting rooms in children’s hospitals, which exist as a site for both nostalgia and trauma. The series will begin to unpack the complicated dynamics of families with sick children, and examine the US medical establishment’s long legacy of discriminating against and exploiting black Americans, the indelible memory of which remains deeply embedded in the collective consciousness of the community.

Visit Damien Davis every Saturday at MAD's Artist Studios.
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#MADArtistStudios #DamienDavis #MixedMedia #MixedMediaSculpture


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Museum of Arts and Design

Carol Prusa is a mid-career contemporary artist known for her meticulous silverpoint technique and use of unexpected materials from sculpted resin and fiberglass to metal leaf and LED lights. Prusa seeks to express her euphoria when glimpsing the strangeness and vital beauty of what is possible – to give form to thin spaces that evoke the mystery that both surrounds and binds us together.

See her work in 'MAD Collects: The Future of Craft Part 1,' on view through March 31, 2019. The exhibition examines works by a diverse roster of forward-thinking artists who are pushing the boundaries of craft.
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Carol Prusa, 'United States Bridge (Einstein-Rosen),' 2012. Silverpoint, graphite, titanium white pigment with acrylic binder on curved acrylic with lights, 60 × 60 × 12 in. (152.4 × 152.4 × 30.5 cm). #MADCollects #TheFutureofCraft #ContemporaryCraft #Craft #CarolPrusa


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Museum of Arts and Design

Burke Prize finalist Holland Houdek (@hollandhoudek) combines traditional metalworking techniques with the new technology of medical implants to create contemporary memento mori that encourage contemplation of the fragility and mortality of the human body.

See her work in 'The Burke Prize: The Future of Craft Part 2.' On view through March 17, 2019.
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Holland Houdek, 'Reconstructive Uterine Cavity,' 2014. Copper, Swarovski crystals and patina, 7 3/4 × 6 1/4 × 1 1/4 in. (19.7 × 15.9 × 3.2 cm), courtesy of the artist.

#BurkePrize #TheFutureofCraft #Craft #ContemporaryCraft #Copper #SwarovskiCrystals


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Museum of Arts and Design

The holiday season is upon us! 🎊 @thestoreatmad has plenty of affordable, unique, and contemporary gifts that won't break the bank. 🎁🏦🚫🔨 Want to save even more 💵💵💵? Join as a member to get $15 off membership (which includes benefits like unlimited admission, discounted public program tickets, special invites, and so much more) AND a 20% discount on all purchases from The Store at MAD (use the code MADGIFT18 to save).


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Museum of Arts and Design

We are saddened by the passing of artist Wendy Ramshaw (1939-2018). A trained designer of printed textiles and illustration, Ramshaw had played a significant role since the early 1970s in establishing British jewelry as an international force. Coming from a background in design, she was free from the fetters of jewelry traditions. The artist was best known for her innovative combinations of rings, which, when not being worn, are meant to be displayed on elaborate stands, as sculptural objects. Widely traveled as a visiting artist, Ramshaw absorbed many influences and incorporated many materials into her work, ranging from feathers to ceramics and glass.

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Wendy Ramshaw, 'Chain of Glass Tears for Weeping Woman,' 1998, 16 1/8 x 3 1/2 x 1/4 in, glass and blackened steel. Gift of Barbara Tober, 2005. Part of MAD’s permanent collection (currently not on view).


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Museum of Arts and Design

On view now 👁👁: ‘Lauren Skelly Bailey: Studio Focus’ incorporates assemblage sculptures, photography, conglomerations, and a site-specific installation, all featuring the artist’s distinctive layering, glazing, and reuse of ceramic materials.

Bailey’s paradoxically subtle and vibrantly colored works often reference the natural world, especially critically endangered coral environments, in which certain corals change to near-neon hues before being bleached due to the ravages of global warming.🌎
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#Ceramics

Photo: Kat Ryals


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Museum of Arts and Design

MAD artist-in-residence Jesse Harrod (@jkharrod) manipulates and transforms materials to animate their sexual and sensual qualities and explore the intersections between queer kinship, support, and sexuality. In her sculptural installations, she works with rope as a pliable element that she regards much like a drawing tool, specifically utilizing knot-making techniques such as macrame in ways that can be understood as simultaneously restraining and supporting. She is interested in the doubleness of rope as an element used within queer sexual play and as a material that conveys how bodies rely upon and support one another. 🌈

At MAD, Harrod is creating a series of works that investigates the relationship between color and gender identity. While color has always played an active role in her sculptural works, in these new works she is using color as a conceptual tool to explore how physical form, and forms of gendered embodiment, are made and remade through perception. ❤️🧡💛💚💙💜💖 Visit Harrod every Friday in #MADArtistStudios to learn more about work and process.

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#MixedMedia #MixedMediaSculpture


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Museum of Arts and Design

Burke Prize finalist Merritt Johnson (@me.rritt) rewrites indigenous and colonial histories through sculptural baskets that resemble artifacts on view in natural history and ethnographic museums, highlighting the complicated relationship between indigenous craft and its collection and display. Her work navigates spaces between bodies and the body politic, between land and culture rooted in and dependent on Anowarakowa Kawennote (Turtle Island). She has seen and felt the effects of the tongues, knives, and pens that cut apart land, culture, sex, and communities; she responds by creating works that build connection and vision. Her work casts light and shadow on how and who we are, and on how and who we could be.

See her work in the 'The Burke Prize 2018: The Future of Craft Part 2' On view through March 17, 2019.
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Merritt Johnson, ‘Container' (trade object), 2016. Hand-woven fiber and dentalium shells, 6 × 10 × 6 in. (15.2 × 25.4 × 15.2 cm), Courtesy the artist.

#BurkePrize #TheFutureofCraft #ContemporaryCraft #Craft #Handwoven #Fiber


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Museum of Arts and Design

Feminist artist and educator Judy Chicago (@judy.chicago) is well known as the founder of the first feminist art program in the United States. She launched the program at Fresno State College and later reestablished it at the California Institute of the Arts with Miriam Schapiro. Her work ranges in scale and material, from painting and needlework to large-scale collaborative mixed-media artworks like ‘The Dinner Party,’ which commemorates historical and mythical female figures.

Created with weaver and longtime collaborator Audrey Cowan, Chicago’s series “What If Women Ruled the World?” challenges accepted patriarchal traditions and offers a glimpse into an imagined reality. The significance of the series’ messages is reinforced by the choice of tapestry technique, a weft-faced weaving technique historically used to create portable murals, which might depict coats of arms, state emblems, or biblical and mythical narratives.

The work is featured in ‘MAD Collects: The Future of Craft Part 1.’ On view through March 31, 2019.
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Judy Chicago (United States, b. 1939) and Audrey Cowan (United States, 1931–2017), 'Would God Be Female? and Would There Be Equal Parenting?' from the “What If Women Ruled the World?” series, 2004. Modified Aubusson tapestry. Gift of the Robert and Audrey Cowan Family Trust, 2015.

#MADCollects #JudyChicago #Tapestry #FeministArt


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Museum of Arts and Design

Happy #Hannukah to all those celebrating! 💙 Pictured here is 'Menorah Brooch' (1995) by artist Ita Aber (United States, b. 1932). The brooch is made of gold and topaz.

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Gift of Joshua Aber, 2008


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Museum of Arts and Design

Sketch your ideal creature and then create your own soft toy 🐻 with textile designer and MAD artist-in-resident Elodie Blanchard (@theofficialelodie) in a fun and exciting workshop on Sunday, December 2 from 10 am to 1 pm! 🥳 At 10:30 am, join us for MADreads, where we’ll be reading Stripe Island, written and illustrated by the dynamic duo tupera tupera. 📖 This event is free with Museum admission.

In her artistic practice, textile designer Elodie Blanchard makes use of the textile waste that inevitably accumulates during the process of designing fabric and creating fiber installations. At MAD, Blanchard is creating playful “tree” sculptures out of Poly-Fil, metal rods, concrete, and fabric, and sewing embroidered textile scraps to create large collage wall hangings inspired by fauna or flora. Taken together, these elements create an enchanted landscape of nonsense, an alternative universe made of all the stuff not needed in our society of overconsumption. Blanchard’s interest lies in spotting discarded objects and transforming them into something whole and beautiful.

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#Textiles #TextileDesigner #ElodieBlanchardStudio #StudioSunday


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Museum of Arts and Design

"His objects hint at the historical forms and functionality of ceramics but refuse to satisfy their requirements. They are founded on a love of improvisation."—Roberta Smith, @nytimes
Los Angeles–based artist Sterling Ruby’s larger body of work includes a wide range of formats, many with a relationship to craft traditions, both studio and amateur. In addition to ceramics, his practice incorporates fabric, found-metal sculpture, cardboard collages, and drawings on paper. Sculptures in clay have long held a fascinating and primary position in Ruby’s broader studio work. Though he has no interest in separating himself from the history of his materials, Ruby upends tradition in his hybrid ceramic forms, which are simultaneously familiar and alien.

The exhibition is on view through March 17, 2019.
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Sterling Ruby, 'EURYDICE, 2018. Ceramic, 41 x 21 5/8 x 17 inches (104.1 x 54.9 x 43.2 cm)

#SterlingRubyCeramics #SterlingRuby #ContemporaryCraft #Craft #Ceramics


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