Museum of the City of New York@museumofcityny

Where the past informs the future. Open daily 10am-6pm. #CyclinginNYC #CityforCorduroy #JackieRobinson100. 6/6: #VoiceoftheVillage + #PrideEqualsPower

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Museum of the City of New York

Hattie McKeever's business dealt largely with the macabre as the primary waxworks shop for Coney Island's World in Wax Musee. She created waxworks reenacting murders, executions, accidents, and crimes meant to frighten amusement park visitors. She also made notable figures such as Julius Caesar and King Solomon, and in a 1949 New York Post profile said, "I've traveled around the world a dozen times and lived hundreds of years without leaving this room." 🔗 Link in bio for more photos of her workshop, her staged creations, and a foggy day in Coney Island. 🎡
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📷: Robert Offergeld. “Coney Island Waxworks.” 1950. Museum of the City of New York, X2011.4.12083.3. #ConeyIsland #waxworks #waxmuseum #waxmusee


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Museum of the City of New York

After 637 performances, the play “Dead End” closed on #thisdayinplay in 1937. Set during the Depression, the story follows a group of boys on the crime-filled streets of the Lower East Side. The show gave rise to the Dead End Kids, a group of young actors who went on to star in several movies. You can enjoy this image and more Broadway behind-the-scenes in “A City For Corduroy: Don Freeman’s New York," now on view. Come by soon! The exhibition closes June 23rd. #CityforCorduroy
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📷: White Studio. ["Dead End" theater still.], 1935. Museum of the City of New York, 49.93.1. ©The New York Public Library.


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Museum of the City of New York

Now open! "PRIDE: Photographs of Stonewall and Beyond by Fred W. McDarrah." Photographer Fred W. McDarrah was one of the few photographers present to document the Stonewall uprising in 1969. See his photographs of this watershed moment in LGBTQ history, plus decades of NYC Pride parades that followed. #PridePower #WorldPride #PrideMonth
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📷: Fred W. McDarrah, "First Gay Pride March," July 27, 1969. Courtesy Fred W. McDarrah Archive/MUUS Asset Management Co LLC.


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Museum of the City of New York

East Harlem, 1952. Taken just around the corner from the Museum on 105th St. near Park Avenue, this photograph is a recent acquisition to our collection of over 400,000 photographic prints and negatives. It was taken by Walter Rosenblum, a member of the Photo League (along with photographers Lewis Hine and Berenice Abbott) who taught photography at Brooklyn College for 40 years. In addition to photos, our collection includes costumes & textiles, objects documenting the history of theater in NYC, silver by New York silversmiths, and so much more. Check out the link in bio for more on breadth of the Museum’s collection.
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📷: Walter Rosenblum. Hopscotch, 105th Street, NY. 1952. Museum of the City of New York, 2017.38.28. #eastharlem #nychistory #hopscotch


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Museum of the City of New York

This beautiful neighbor of ours across the park is celebrating a milestone today: the cornerstone of its first building was placed by U.S. President Rutherford B. Hayes on this day in 1874. That very first structure (swipe 👉 to see what it looked like ca. 1877) was soon overshadowed by this imposing building that we all recognize. So glad you found your home along @CentralPark just like us, @amnh! 🎉
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📷 : Irving Underhill, 1913. Museum of the City of New York, X2010.11.1575; Harroun & Bierstadt, ca. 1877. Museum of the City of New York, X2010.11.1234. #onthisday #otd #nychistory #amnh


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Museum of the City of New York

Can you guess what proposed mode of NYC transport this is? (Swipe 👉for a closer look.)
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This is the "Carveyor," a transportation invention intended to replace for the ever-congested shuttle between Grand Central and Times Square. The Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company and Stephens-Adamson Manufacturing Company put their engineering and manufacturing brains together and came up with a “low-cost, more efficient 42nd Street Shuttle service for long-suffering New Yorkers." In 1954, it looked like the city was going to move forward with the project after being awarded $3.8 million for it, but the idea was ultimately cancelled due to high costs. #neverbuiltnyc
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📷 : H.A. Bruno & Associates. [Working model.] 1953. Museum of the City of New York; H.A. Bruno & Associates. [Close-up of working model.] 1953. Museum of the City of New York.


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Museum of the City of New York

Photographer Fred W. McDarrah created an encyclopedic archive of NYC culture & politics from the 1950s through the 1970s for the alternative newsweekly "The Village Voice," and our exhibition of his photographs opens one week from today on June 6. From the Beats to the Stonewall uprising to anti-Vietnam activism, McDarrah captured the evolving and vibrant life of the Village. #VoiceoftheVillage Also opening June 6 is the companion exhibition, "PRIDE: Photographs of Stonewall and Beyond by Fred W. McDarrah," which focuses on McDarrah’s images of gay pride and other LGBTQ parades, demonstrations, and events. #PridePower
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📷: Fred W. McDarrah, "Outside the Caffe Borgia, at MacDougal and Bleecker Streets," 1966. Courtesy Fred W. McDarrah Archive/MUUS Asset Management Co LLC. #villagevoice #thevillage #greenwichvillage #eastvillage #fredmcdarrah #pride #worldpride #pride2019


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Museum of the City of New York

Recognize any faces in this photograph from 1964? You might not recognize the speaker, garment union president David Dubinsky, but unions were so powerful in the mid-20th century that it was considered only natural that he would speak at a massive midtown election rally for President Lyndon Johnson, joined by Johnson’s running mate Hubert Humphrey and U. S. Senator Robert F. Kennedy. This incredible power that unions wielded was not equally shared, however, and female, African-American, Latino, and Asian American New Yorkers still fought obstacles to their presence in union ranks and leadership. Learn more about the history of labor in NYC in #CityofWorkers, now on view.
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📷 : Burton Berinsky. ILGWU President David Dubinsky and Liberal Party leader Alex Rose rally voters for LBJ, RFK, and Hubert Humphrey, Seventh Avenue, 1964. Courtesy of Kheel Center for Labor-Management Documentation & Archives, Cornell University.


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Museum of the City of New York

Who's ready to frolic this weekend? #caturday #catsofinstagram #archivalcats
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Currier & Ives. Ready for a Frolic, 1874. Museum of the City of New York, 56.300.333.


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Museum of the City of New York

The 42nd St. branch of @NYPL opened to the public on this day in 1911. The monumental building had been dedicated the day before by President William Howard Taft and included 75 miles of bookshelves to hold its collection of over one million books. 📚 The beautiful beaux-arts building remains a beloved NYC landmark today, welcoming more than ten million visitors a year. 😮
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📷: David Robbins, Federal Art Project. General Scenes. [New York Public Library.], May 1937. Museum of the City of New York, 43.131.10.125. #otd #onthisday #onthisdayinhistory #nychistory #nypl #library #libraries #beauxarts #bookstagram #booksonbooksonbooks


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Museum of the City of New York

Artist and author Don Freeman came to New York to study art but could not escape his love of theater, sometimes sneaking backstage to draw the stagehands and actors. 🎭 The time Freeman spent backstage is evident in his book, "Hattie the Backstage Bat," originally published in 1970. It is the story of a theater bat who lives in the rafters of the Lyceum. But, unlike Freeman, Hattie is not content with simply watching the happenings of theater and has plans to make her theatrical debut... will such a little bat cause a big scare on opening night? You can learn more about Hattie and Freeman's other children's book characters, like Corduroy the bear, in #CityforCorduroy (now on view). // Preparatory work for "Hattie the Backstage Bat," 1970. Charcoal on Board.
Don Freeman Papers, Kerlan Collection, Children’s Literature Research Collections, University of Minnesota.


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Museum of the City of New York

145 years ago on #thisdayinplay, "the popular American tragedian, Mr. John McCullough… in his thrilling personation of Damon in John Banim’s classic play… ’Damon and Pythias’” performed at Booth’s Theatre (23rd Street between Fifth and Sixth Avenue). New Yorkers could enjoy an evening of dramatic entertainment for as little as 25 cents. 👉 Swipe through to see all three sections of this theater broadside from our collection!

Many of our 19th-century theater broadsides have recently been conserved and digitized, newly available on our website! This project was possible thanks to a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities: Exploring the human endeavor (@nehgov).


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