National Geographic@natgeo

Experience the world through the eyes of National Geographic photographers.

http://natgeo.com/environment/plasticpledge

Photograph by @simonnorfolkstudio

Chichen Itzá was a large pre-Columbian Maya city in Yucatán State, Mexico, and a major focal point in the Maya Lowlands from the Late Classic period (c. CE600–900) through the Terminal Classic (c. CE800–900) to the Postclassic period (c. CE900–1200). Architecturally, the site exhibits a multitude of styles, reminiscent of central Mexico and of the Puuc and Chenes styles of the Northern Maya lowlands. The presence of central Mexican styles was once thought to have been representative of direct migration or even conquest from central Mexico, but most recent interpretations view the presence of these non-Maya styles more as the result of cultural diffusion.

Here photographed, the Temple of the Warriors (Templo de los Guerrero), which consists of a large stepped pyramid flanked and fronted by rows of carved columns depicting warriors. It is one of the most impressive and important buildings at Chichen Itzá. The structure entombs a former building called The Temple of the Chac Mool. The complex was excavated and restored by the Carnegie Institution of Washington from 1925 to 1928.

Follow @simonnorfolkstudio for updates, outtakes, unpublished and archive material.Photograph by @simonnorfolkstudio

@simonnorfolkstudio @natgeo

#documentaryphotography #simonnorfolk #mexico #mayaworld #mayanworld #yucatan #history #heritage #worldheritage #worldheritagesite #archaeology #mayaruins #mayanruins #igtravel #visualarchitects #lighting #dusk #chichenItza #chaacmool

image: @simonnorfolkstudio
words: @tribaleye


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Image by @beverlyjoubert. Keeping a possessive paw on his kill while he gets his breath back. The Duba Plains lions were famed for their buffalo hunts, but buffalo herds will move with the seasons, following the best grass. The lechwe population has bounced back remarkably in the decade since hunting ended here, and despite the antelopes’ adaptations to swampy areas, these Okavango lions are well used to hunting in and around water and can easily match their speed. In the absence of buffalo, lechwe now make up a significant portion of their diet. #okavangolions #bigcats #thisismytrophy


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Photo by: @renaeffendiphoto
Egyptian family at a Cairo theme park pose in ways that recall the natural, family-oriented style of ancient Egyptian Amarna art transformed by the 18th dynasty pharaoh Akhenathen. #art #ancientegypt #egypt #history #people


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Sun Xueli is wearing a blouse involuntarily assorted with the mountain of plastic bottles that surround her. Her work is to detach the paper strips and sort the plastic bottles by color. When the bottles arrive to her, at the colleting point in Hua Jü Yuan in the south of Beijing, they have already passed trough three stages: the migrant worker that collects them in the road, the intermediary that has bought them and then sold them in bulk to the contractor that rents this space from the state owned company China Recycling Development Corporation. CRDC will then sell the sorted bottles to a factory in the south of China that will eventually recycle them. / Photo by @paolowoods #china #planetorplastic #plastic


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@natgeo photo by @stevewinterphoto with @africanparksnetwork

Lions in Malawi, the ‘warm heart of Africa’, are making a comeback! The country’s pride is growing as six wild lions have been safely transported from South Africa to their new homes in Majete Wildlife Reserve and Liwonde National Park to help revive the parks’ predator populations. Just last week, four of these lions (two males and two females) joined the two male lions who were translocated to Liwonde in February this year. Lions were last seen in the park over four years ago, and it had been even longer since a breeding population lived in the park. We moved the other two males to Majete Wildlife Reserve to improve the genetic diversity of the current lion population there. All lions are in secure enclosures (bomas) where they are adjusting to their new environment and bonding, and will be released over the coming weeks and months. Africa’s wildlife has suffered immensely in recent decades, and the lion population has crashed by more than 40% since 1993. Just 100 years ago, more than 200,000 lions lived in Africa- today, best estimates put them at fewer than 20,000. “Very simply, if a park is not being managed then it will be lost, we have two options, one is we allow these places to disappear. The other is we make our own plan,” says CEO of @africanparksnetwork, Peter Fearnhead who was recently quoted by the Washington Post (see link in our bio). By working closely with the Government of Malawi, the local community as with critical support from the Dutch Government, @lionrecovery and @leonardodicapriofdn – we are making a plan to restore the species to protected areas across Africa for the benefit of future generations. #AfricanParks #NaturesReturn #Conservation #Wildlife #Liwonde #Majete #Lions #Predators @africanparksnetwork #DutchGovernment, @lionrecovery and @leonardodicapriofdn @Zakouma_national_park


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Photo by @CarltonWard // One of my camera traps, which I checked last week, produced this photo of a bobcat winding it's way through cypress knees and over a downed tree in Florida Panther National Wildlife Refuge. This is one of my favorite and most challenging camera sites. My goal is to show an endangered Florida panther amidst the quintessential south Florida swamp habitat that has been necessary for its survival during the past century. But since I first placed a camera trap here in 2015, the swamp has been flooded with water for 70 percent of the time. I've captured an amazing alligator photo, some good bear shots, and now this bobcat, but not yet a panther image that rises to the promise of this location. And now the rainy season has started again. Hopefully I'll get a couple more weeks of when this drainage is still a dry trail, and maybe a panther will come through. If not, it will be another 8 months before the water subsides and I can try again. Meanwhile, I am thankful for this bobcat that came through in the twilight hours to show off its beautiful forest home. My #PathofthePanther project with @NatGeo is about using the story of the Florida panther to inspire appreciation and protection of the Florida Wildlife Corridor so we can keep the Everglades connected to the rest of America and provide and path for the northward expansion and recovery of the panther, for the benefit of all of the other species (and people) who rely on its domain. Please follow @CarltonWard for more hidden wildlife. @FL_WildCorridor @USFWS @myfwc #FloridaWild #KeepFLWild


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Photo by @williamalbertallard // These bison plunging through deep snow were photographed in Montana in 1966. I was fairly new at National Geographic but had been assigned to photograph wildlife in the winter in Yellowstone National Park. Yellowstone then had a herd of about 400 bison that park management was trying to gather to check for brucellosis, a contagious disease that in cattle can cause cows to abort their calves. I was flying at about 500 feet in a Bell two-seater helicopter piloted by Bob Schellinger, renown for his mountain rescue work and then working for the park along with fellow pilot Elwood “Swede” Nelson. The day’s objective was to find groups of bison that inhabited the park’s Hayden Valley. When spotted, we’d drop down to skim along at tree level trying to drive them into a lane created in some timber leading to a corral trap built along Nez Perce Creek. Once contained, they’d be worked into chutes and blood tested. In the case of this picture a small number of bison had swung around to face and seemingly challenge us and in the combination of the deep snow and the downdraft from the helicopter the swirling snow created an almost watercolor-like palette for my Kodachrome transparency.
Flying with Bob was a great pleasure. He was a superb pilot and a very nice man with a dry sense of humor. At night we used to shoot pool at a bar in tiny Gardiner, Montana where we lived in a place called the Town Motel right at the edge of the northwest entrance to the park. Bob Schellinger died in a crash several years later while attempting a mountain rescue. My essay, “Yellowstone Wildlife in Winter,” the first essay I wrote as well as photographed for National Geographic was published in November, 1967.
#followme @williamalbertallard for more images of Montana and other assignments spanning five decades.
@thephotosociety
#wildlifephotography #filmphotography #bison


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These exuberant birds are vulturine guineafowl, photographed at @lincolnchildrenszoo here in Nebraska. They are gregarious creatures that flock in groups of up to 25 birds in the forests of central Africa. Though they live in open habitats, they are most comfortable when undercover and will roost in trees. Vulturine guineafowl are terrestrial, so rather than fly away when alarmed, as most birds do, they will run.
To see an up close portrait of a vulturine guineafowl, check out @joelsartore


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photos by @vincentjmusi
Tolliver, Monty, Django, Bear and Mary Anne, 2017-2018

Not every dog thinks having his or her portrait made is such a great idea and I wonder at times if I’ve lost a bit of my inner Dr. Dolittle.
I present a selection of photographs where things didn’t always go as planned from my personal work with dogs.

You can’t learn from your mistakes if you don’t make any, you can find more of mine @vincentjmusi

#yearofthedogs


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Photo: @tbfrost | Almost nothing is known about green anacondas in the primary rainforest of the Amazon. A team of researchers I'm traveling with here is trying to change that. Unfortunately, the only Anaconda we've come across in nearly three weeks is this dead one , which was killed with multiple machete blows to the head. It seems that every snake locals see , they kill. This anaconda was killed because it was trying to eat a chicken , but it probably didn't have a choice as the swamp that was once its home has largely been filled in with sand so people can build homes. This isn't a new problem , it is a classic conservation issue, but what makes it worse in this situation is so little is known about green anacondas here in Peru researchers can't say how devastating or not the loss of a single snake is to the ecosystem and the survival of the species.
If you want to follow me as I look for the largest snake in the world in the swamps of the Amazon rainforest, I'm @tbfrost


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Video by @renan_ozturk

During our recent shoot in Chilean Patagonia I noticed the uncanny similarity of the huge ice and rock formations throughout the region. ~

Enjoy this little sampler of the environmental mimicry flying through one the last wild conservation success stories on earth. ~

With drone pilot @aaroncohan, Photographer @chrisburkard, and conservation masters @tompkins_conservation @kristine_tompkins. #patagonia #drone #rewilding #turningthetide ~

See @renan_ozturk for more aerials from around the globe.


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Film by @kitracahana // Find link to film on my Instagram account. //
Stephane Alexis, 24, has put his own goals and aspirations on hold to help his parents care for his younger brother Torence, who has cerebral palsy. He spends upwards of 20 hours per week caring for Tor and has noticed the toll that caregiving can take mentally as well as physically. “It’s not an easy job. He needs you for everything, so you have to be taking care of him 24/7” Stephane says.

Young caregivers are an often overlooked population with millions of children and young adults caring for loved ones with little access to emotional as well as financial support.
Find the link for the full short film - Caring for Tor on my Instagram account. @kitracahana

#youngcarer #youngcaregiver #cerebralpalsy #caregiving #caregiver #care #disability #ottawa #canada #youngcarers #brothers #love


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