National Geographic Your Shot@natgeoyourshot

We are Your Shot — National Geographic's photo community. Let's tell stories together. #YourShotPhotographer

http://natgeoyourshot.com/

2,500 posts 737,653 followers 237 following

Lions in Lines | Photograph by Torie Hilley
.
Your Shot photographer Torie Hilley didn't think she'd be able to see anything interesting through the tall grass while on a safari in Zambia. "Then this pride of lions came walking toward us," she says, "taking advantage of the road to travel on. They, too, seemed they were tired of the tall grass swatting at their faces!"

Today we’re featuring @natgeoyourshot photographs selected for @natgeo “Photo of the Day.” To see more, go to natgeo.com/pod. #YourShotPhotographer


83

Under the Wave | Photograph by Rodney Bursiel (@rodneybursiel)
.
"I'm always looking for new angles and perspectives," says Your Shot photographer Rodney Bursiel. While photographing pro surfer Donavon Frankenreiter (@donavon_frankenreiter) in Fiji, they decided to get clever. "Makes you look twice," Bursiel says.

Today we’re featuring @natgeoyourshot photographs selected for @natgeo “Photo of the Day.” To see more, go to natgeo.com/pod. #YourShotPhotographer


120

Rainbow Windows | Photograph by Andrei Z. (@disdrei)
.
Colorful windows brighten a street in Singapore that's usually full of activity. Your Shot photographer Andrei Z. wanted to capture the scene, but the traffic made it impossible. "On my last day I was walking by again and noticed that the entire block was deserted. Incredible," he remembers. "I took a few shots of the building in all its glory, however now it was lacking life. Ironically, I found myself waiting for some sign of human life to enter the frame."

Today we’re featuring @natgeoyourshot photographs selected for @natgeo “Photo of the Day.” To see more, go to natgeo.com/pod. #YourShotPhotographer


100

Three-toed Sloth | Photograph by Matthijs Hollanders (@matthijs.hollanders)
.
“During a late-night hike through the Chocoan lowlands of Ecuador,” writes #YourShotPhotographer Matthijs Hollanders, “we came across a three-toed sloth close to the ground who was willing to pose for some quick photos.”

To celebrate #InternationalSlothDay, here are three facts for you about the three-toed sloth:
• The sloth is world’s slowest animal, so sedentary that algae grows on its furry coat.
• Sloths sleep in trees, and they sleep a lot — some 15 to 20 hours every day.
• The three-toed sloth emits a long, high-pitched call that echoes through the forests as “ahh-eeee” Because of this cry these sloths are sometimes called ais (pronounced “eyes”).


200

Emerging Hammerhead | Photograph by Rick Miskiv (@22degrees.co)
.
“While I was diving the Bajo Alcyone divesite at Cocos Island in Costa Rica, this hammerhead emerged from a school of jacks,” writes Your Shot photographer Rick Miskiv. “There was a massive school of jacks near a hammerhead cleaning station that suddenly swarmed the reef. They obscured my presence to the sharks. Then I saw the first hint of the hammerhead in the cloud of jacks. It was very exciting because I could tell the shark was directly approaching, and I think we were both equally surprised!”

This photo was submitted to the Underwater category of the 2017 Nature Photographer of the Year photo contest. The grand prize winner will receive $7500; their winning image will be published in an upcoming issue of National Geographic magazine, and featured on the @natgeo Instagram account. To enter, go to natgeo.com/photocontest. Good luck #YourShotPhotographer


59

Top Shot: What’s Up? | Photograph by Barbara Engel
.
“As I was walking along the beach, most of the elephant seals were taking a nap around midday on South Georgia Island,” writes Your Shot photographer Barbara Engel, “when suddenly this seal raised its head as if to say, ‘What’s up?’”

Top Shot features the photo with the most votes from the previous day’s Daily Dozen, 12 photos chosen by the Your Shot editors from thousands of recent uploads. Our community votes for their favorite photo from the selection, and the Top Shot is showcased on the @natgeoyourshot Instagram account. #YourShotPhotographer


114

Chasing Light | Photograph by Shri Gorde
.
Rowers practicing one winter morning on a river.

“At first, I thought it was a water strider, but later realized it was bunch of rowers practicing. I loved the synchronized ripples, sense of movement and direction, and the morning mist in the image. Cutting out the sun from the frame works well keeping the entire attention on the silhouetted subject. Beautiful image!” — @natgeo Photographer & Explorer Prasenjeet Yadav (@prasen88)
.
This photo was submitted to our “Chasing Moments” assignment — #Sponsored by @nikonusa — and curated by @natgeo photographer Ami Vitale (@amivitale). To participate in our assignment and share your “Chasing Moments,” go to the link in our profile. #YourShotPhotographer


178

[ #TBT From October 19, 2016 ] Top Shot: Watch the Cloud | Photograph by Vladimir Voychuk (@voy4uk)
.
A lenticular cloud forms over the volcanic peaks of the Kamchatka peninsula in Russia’s far east. The lens-shaped meteorological phenomenon forms at high altitudes as air passes over mountains.

Top Shot features the photo with the most votes from the previous day’s Daily Dozen, 12 photos chosen by the Your Shot editors from thousands of recent uploads. Our community votes for their favorite photo from the selection, and the Top Shot is showcased on the @natgeoyourshot Instagram account. #YourShotPhotographer


139

The Duel | Photograph by Sonalini Khetrapal (@photography.nona)
.
“The open and arid landscape of Etosha National Park in Namibia is truly stunning. The goal of my trip was to photograph zebras with their striking coats across this backdrop,” writes Your Shot photographer Sonalini Khetrapal. “A herd of zebras arrived at the waterhole to quench their thirst. Suddenly there was chaos and thick dust clouds blinding our vision. Within moments, two male zebras emerged from the dust, landing blows at each other with their hooves and heads. The duel only lasted a few minutes, but it gave me an opportunity to capture this heavily charged moment.”

Top Shot features the photo with the most votes from the previous day’s Daily Dozen, 12 photos chosen by the Your Shot editors from thousands of recent uploads. Our community votes for their favorite photo from the selection, and the Top Shot is showcased on the @natgeoyourshot Instagram account. #YourShotPhotographer


175

Tactile | Photograph by Ethel Nalule (@ethel)
.
“I woke up bright and early to catch the sun shining through my window blinds. I titled this photo ‘tactile’ for a series I am currently working on portraying my battle with Lyme disease,” writes Your Shot photographer Ethel Nalule. “Tactile by definition means, ‘connected with a sense of touch.’ One of my symptoms is Allodynia, a rather painful and uncomfortable feeling all over my body, caused by the lightest touch. Pain from clothing, pain from wind, pain from anything. The severity is different from day to day.”

“Thank you for sharing your story. I love how your frame resonates with Your Shot photographer Andrea LaRiviere: ‘I like the rawness of this image. The light is beautiful and hot. I too have Lyme disease (have had it for over 11 years now). My skin does not hurt like yours, instead it is muscle pain all over my body in random places and severe migraines… My heart goes out to you. I hope you find a way to deal with the cruelties this disease inflicts. It seems you have through your photography.” — @natgeoyourshot Producer David Y. Lee (@davidylee)
.
This photo was selected for our “Quiet Moments” story, curated by David Y. Lee. To submit to our current assignments “Chasing Moments” curated by @natgeo photographer Ami Vitale (@amivitale) and “Because of Her” curated by @natgeo photographer Amy Toensing (@amytoensing) and David Y. Lee, go to the link in our profile. #YourShotPhotographer


47

Pool Freediving Woman | Photograph by Marc Henauer (@marchenauer)
.
“This woman is freediving training — ‘dynamic apnoea without fins’ — in a swimming pool; the purpose is to swim as far as possible on one breath, using only their hands and feet,” writes Your Shot photographer Marc Henauer. “The world record in this discipline is 300 meters (984 feet) for men and 191 meters (626 feet) for women. During the performance, you deep diving within oneself, alone in the world in a monastic silence.”

“I love it. And then after reading your caption, and learning more about what is happening in your photo, I love it even more Marc. I feel her concentration, all focused on her training, on becoming better. And I feel myself quietly cheering her on… Well done Marc.” — @natgeoyourshot Producer David Y. Lee (@davidylee)
.
This photo was selected for our “Quiet Moments” story, curated by David Y. Lee. To submit to our current assignments “Chasing Moments” curated by @natgeo photographer Ami Vitale (@amivitale) and “Because of Her” curated by @natgeo photographer Amy Toensing (@amytoensing) and David Y. Lee, go to the link in our profile. #YourShotPhotographer


93