New Museum@newmuseum

New Art, New Ideas

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New Museum

Since the early 1990s, #NariWard (@nariward) has produced his works by accumulating staggering amounts of humble materials and repurposing them in consistently surprising ways. His approach evokes a variety of folk traditions and creative acts of recycling from Jamaica, where he was born, as well as the material textures of Harlem, where he has lived and worked for the past twenty-five years. For a closer look at "Nari Ward: We the People," join art historian Abbe Schriber this Thursday, March 28, for a special gallery talk. More info and tickets at the link in our bio.
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Photo: Nari Ward, "Trophy," 1993. Baby stroller, found objects, sugar, and Tropical Fantasy soda. Photo courtesy Maris Hutchinson / EPW Studio.


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New Museum

Our latest #ScreensSeries showcases artist #HeleneNymann, whose work addresses the notion of embodied knowledge—contextual and experimental forms of receiving and transmitting ideas. Nymann’s work incorporates dance and other kinds of movement to probe the ways in which bodily memory is stimulated by different textures and physical sensations. See a selection of Nymann's works in our Lower Level through April 28.
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Photo: @helenenymann, "Whether We Are," 2016 (still). Single-channel video (16:9 HDV), sound; 10:10 min. Courtesy the artist


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New Museum

#NariWard’s “Spellbound” (2015) comprises a modest piano covered with house keys and Spanish moss. A screen concealed on the back presents a short film depicting people and places in Savannah, GA, focusing on the persistence of cultural traditions in the African-American community there and on the layers of historical memory embedded in local architecture. Throughout his career, @nariward has examined the brutal history of slavery and the post-emancipation period in the United States, and how this tragic past remains deeply ingrained in both American consciousness and the foundations of specific sites. See the work as part of "We the People" through May 26.
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Photos: Maris Hutchinson / EPW Studio


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New Museum

"skinonskinonskin" (1999) is a series of digital love letters sent between artists Auriea Harvey (@auriea.art), then known online as Entropy8, and Michaël Samyn, then known as Zuper!. The two artists met in 1999 on hell.com and began a romance by exchanging interactive web pages in Flash with audio, text, and images. Originally sharing their love letters solely with one another, Harvey and Samyn later made them available to paid subscribers as an online artwork. The work upends traditional ideas of physical intimacy; putting the user in the role of recipient of their love letters, it allows one to feel a touch that runs through the wires, between bodies that extend beyond their fingertips.
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Photo: “freezing” from Entropy8Zuper! (Auriea Harvey and Michaël Samyn) skinonskinonskin, 1999. Website. Courtesy the artists. @wearetaleoftales


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New Museum

For “T.P. Reign Bow” (2012), a handmade rendering of a tactical platform commonly used by law enforcement to monitor neighborhoods deemed “dangerous,” #NariWard (@nariward) has added elements like the pictured taxidermy fox with an Afro-tufted tail—an eBay discovery that Ward calls “Cornel” in homage to activist-intellectual Dr. Cornel West— that imbue the typically intimidating structure with an air of whimsy.


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New Museum

The New Museum is proud to announce our third #ScammingThePatriarchy Youth Summit, a day of workshops and celebration organized by artists, activists, and collectives committed to community building, including Asian American Feminist Collective (@aafc.nyc), Scope of Work (@sow.nyc), Unapologetically Brown Series (@theunapologeticallybrownseries), and the New Museum Youth Council.
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Each summit builds upon and reinterprets the principles of healing, self-love, skill building, political education, and empowerment established by the inaugural committee. This year’s program emphasizes alternative forms of resistance that persist in spite of their commercialized, mainstream incarnations. The committee envisions an event that prioritizes those with intersecting marginalized identities, ensuring their concerns and their power remain central to the program. For more info on the event, click the link in our bio. 👆
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Presenters include @a1bazaar, @ethereal.1, @thefreeblackwomenslibrary, Movement Netlab (@blackboikei), @veggiemijas, @fariha_roisin, @spicy.zine, @wocsolidarity, @freetoorising, @thrift.party, and more. This year’s Summit concludes with an after-party hosted by Brooklyn-based collective @discakesnyc, featuring performances by @quaydash in the Sky Room and rising Baltimore hip-hop artist @lorchoc_hd in the New Museum Theater.
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Photo: Johanna Toruño, The Unapologetically Brown Series


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New Museum

#AdelitaHusniBey’s (@house.of.platitudes) new film installation, “#Chiron,” follows a group of immigration lawyers from @unlocalinc as they carry out a series of movements and discursive exercises designed to prompt consideration of their position as both instruments and actors of an unjust legal system. They highlight the ways in which laws weigh on brown and white bodies differently and discuss the racist genealogies of US immigration law, while also uncovering experimental forms of collective healing. See “Chiron” in our South Galleries through April 14.
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Photo: Maris Hutchinson / EPW Studio


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New Museum

Made using scagliola, a marble imitation technique that involves a special composite of plaster, rabbit glue, and natural pigments, the forms of #MarianaCastilloDeball’s “Mathematical Distortions” (2012), like those of mathematician Felix Klein’s topological models, reflect the limitations of matter by representing surfaces that do not exist. These objects speak to the potential of thinking across disciplines and across dimensions of space to reexamine notions of orientation and boundaries.
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Photo: Maris Hutchinson / EPW Studio


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New Museum

Alongside his new body of work on display in “The Anthropophagic Effect,” artist #JeffreyGibson (@jeffrune) has chosen to display a selection of Cherokee and Choctaw objects and garments from his family’s collection. The collection situates Gibson’s own works, many of which incorporate Indigenous handcraft techniques such as Southeastern river cane basket weaving, Algonquian birch bark biting, and porcupine quill work within a wider lineage.
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This Saturday at 3 p.m., join curator and writer Glenn Adamson and art historian Julia Bryan-Wilson for a discussion situating the indigenous craft techniques of Gibson's work alongside handcraft within a broader design history. As a special offer for our followers, use code "NM10" for $5 off the general event price. .
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Photo: Maris Hutchinson / EPW Studio


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New Museum

“Untold” (2013) is among several of #NariWard’s (@nariward) works to reference the bottle tree, a ritualistic form designed to ward off evil spirits by trapping them inside a glass bottle, where sunlight would eventually destroy them. Ward began making his own bottle works in the early 1990s using bottles salvaged from the trash, which he would suspend in networks of yarn. The delicate three-dimensional patterns in these sculptures recall both the form of the bottle tree and American quilting traditions. See “Untold” as part of “We the People,” on view through May 26. And Saturday from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., join us for a special activation of another of Ward’s works to examine the diasporic experience, “Naturalization Drawing Table” (2004).
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Photo: Maris Hutchinson / EPW Studio


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New Museum

"As for advertising, I was attracted to it because of how brilliantly it deploys visual language, despite my distaste for the whole point of selling stuff. I was impressed with way ads manufacture desire without consumers even being aware of it. My aim is to make things that are desirable, too." —#GenesisBelanger (@genesisbelanger), in a February 2019 interview with @timeoutnewyork. Belanger's Storefront Window installation, "Holding Pattern," is on view through April 14.
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Photo: Charles Benton


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New Museum

#AlexeiShulgin's "386 DX," hailed as “the world’s first cyberpunk band,” is fronted by a dingy singing PC that runs Windows 3.1, equipped with an ancient sound card loaded with MIDI files of drums, guitar, and synth. In the liner notes of the 2001 album "The Best of 386 DX," Shulgin is identified as the band’s “operator,” making the computer its de facto front person. Although executed with silliness, the band’s conceit raises issues of ownership in digital production. Hear "386 DX" perform as part of @rhizomedotorg’s "The #ArtHappensHere: Net Art's Archival Poetics" through May 26.


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