Paul Rosolie@paulrosolie

Naturalist, Author of ‘Mother of God’ | Coming soon: #TheGirlandtheTiger | I speak for the trees. @tamanduaexpeditions @junglekeepers

www.paulrosolie.com/

540 posts 57,171 followers 947 following

Paul Rosolie

Sound on** Everything about this day was so fascinating. @coach_partha and I got to join fishermen near Malgalore for the day. The sun was out, the water was beautiful. We rode out until we couldn't see land anymore (but there were dozens of other fishing boats out there). While the boat was waiting we jumped in the ocean and did flips off the boat. What you see in the vid is they drive in a huge circle to lay out the net and then spend HOURS hauling it is. Watching these men sing and haul their catch in was incredible. They do it all by hand! #
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I read some time ago that fisheries along the coast of Africa are stone dead after large trawlers have just sucked everything out of the ocean. That there are millions of fishermen and millions more of their families who have no sustenance because the oceans have been sucked dry. There are no more fish. In parts of India like Kerala, local fisherman have banned large commercial trawlers and maintained traditional fishing methods. I'm not an expert on the subject . But what I do know is that when I watched the red nets falling off the back of this boat I started to feel a little sick. There were so many fish being caught by that net. Tens of thousands. And then I looked back to the horizon where there were so many more boats. There is just no way we can pull that out of the water every day...! Then I saw the drowned sea turtles floating in the water. .
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Part of me watches this video and remembers an AWESOME day full of fun. Those fishermen were hysterical and they worked HARD and took great care of us. And the ocean there is beyond beautiful. It is encouraging that they are still using their own strength to haul in the fish, in an age when nearly everything is mechanized. But it was also a day that made me think long and hard about all those fish, on all those boats, going to all those markets.
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#incredibleindia #incredibleindiaofficial #fishing #fish #environment #ocean #dance #fishinglife #saveoursharks #saveouroceans #video #journaling #paulrosolie


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Paul Rosolie

BOOK GIVEAWAY!!! I’ve never done this before but everyone has been asking me for copies of MOG for Christmas gifts. Also I’ve been really stoked about how awesome you all are. No joke everyone has been so supportive and caring that I’m feeling festive 😂 SO I’m picking THREE winners who need a the gift of JUNGLE for the holidays. .
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TO ENTER:
1. Like this post (duh)
2. Tag a friend in the comments
3. Follow @tamanduaexpeditions
4. That’s it! .
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You have 48hrs to enter and then I’m cutting it off. I’m gonna select THREE random winners who are getting signed copies of Mother of God! I’ll tag the winners in my story next Monday. **Snake not included. Good hunting! .
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#bookstagram #reading #snake #writersofinstagram #bookgiveaway #giveaway #paulrosolie #beautifulbooks #snakesofinstagram #contest #share #readingisfundamental #bookshelf #currentlyreading #nonfiction


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Paul Rosolie

“Tiger! Tiger!" What of the hunting, hunter bold? Brother, the watch was long and cold. What of the quarry ye went to kill? Brother, he crops in the jungle still. Where is the power that made your pride? Brother, it ebbs from my flank and side. Where is the haste that ye hurry by? Brother, I go to my lair—to die.” ― Rudyard Kipling, The Jungle Book
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Fantastic image by @thebisonkabini I discovered through @wildkarnataka 🙏
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#india #tiger #wildlife #thegirlandthetiger #nature #jungle #junglebook #paulrosolie #writersofinstagram #animalsofinstagram #wildindia #wildlifeofindia


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Paul Rosolie

This is a video taken just a few weeks ago when I was in the jungle in India, in the final stages of writing #TheGirlandTheTiger . This elephant is a male who is naturally tusk-less (called a makhna) Like all adult males he is not able to hang out with his mother and the herd. But in the forest hegets knocked around quite a bit by other, larger males that have tusks. So he likes to come hang out with us humans. He’s a wonderful creature and a trouble maker. You can see how he comes up to me as I’m writing and wants to take my notebook (he knows how to get a reaction!). At first I give him some love. Then I push him away. Then, when he keeps going, I push him away you can see me point at him and say ‘now stop it!’ and he gets all upset and flaps his ears and puts his trunk to his mouth.
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This book has been the greatest adventure of my life – and I’ve worked as hard as I can to bring the sights, sounds, and visceral reality of the jungle into every page. The Jungle Book world is still out there. Though today, over a hundred years after Jungle Book was written, the world is a very different place for animals like elephants and tigers.
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I was thinking of saving this footage for next year when the book comes out and promotion time comes. But I decided to share it now. I wanted to say thank you to everyone who follows this page – your support means more than you know. And so I wanted to start now by letting you know that as a conservationist and author (and not a mega-famous established author) I’m going to need help. In the coming months I’m going to be putting together a huge press effort for The Girl and the Tiger and am hoping to link up with book stores, companies, and people like you who can help this book get out there, reach readers, inspire compassion for animals, and become a success. Please comment and DM me if you have contacts or ideas that can help! I want to help wild animals and forests, and inspire young people all over the world to become stewards of our wild brothers and sisters – like this elephant!
Thank you!


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Paul Rosolie

For so many years I hoped for a spectacled cobra and never saw one. The one time I saw one was on a bus and the cobra stood to confront the BUS and the driver would not let me off (!). This one happened - as great wildlife sightings so often do, when I was least expecting it. We were walking back from afternoon coffee and the snake was crossing the road. A crowd of workers and villagers gathered to see as I lifted the snake off the road and took it further into the farm to be released. And what a snake! Absolutely stunning golden scales and a threatening athleticism. But the cobra never struck. It was not quick to fight - but stood and spread its hood - asking me to politely fuck off and leave it alone. The moment I did the snake slithered off and was gone. Thanks for the great photo @gowrivaranashi !!!! .
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#cobra #snake #snakesofinstagram #snakes #reptiles #wildlife #stoked #wildlifephotography #paulrosolie #india #incredibleindia #wildlife #jungle #thegirlandthetiger


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Paul Rosolie

**Sound on** Thought I’d show you all how it’s done 🔥😎🔥🤘 @cmishah is to thank for the epic visuals - she filmed bravely even tho that meant getting pelted with a few flying shards of Hudson Valley shale 😂😳😇
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#rockskippingmaster #blackcreekpreserve #scenichudson #rockskipping #hike #outdoortones #hudsonvalley #newyork #ilovenewyork #hike #optoutside #slowmotion #hudsonriver #saturday #winter


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Paul Rosolie

@harry__turner and I were on a @junglekeepers patrol when we found her. She was emaciated, bleeding, had ticks and broken ribs. She didn’t run, or strike, or try to defend herself. She just let us lift her. Usually yellow tailed cribos are fierce and defensive - grab one by the tail and they’ll let you have it!! But this one was on death’s door. I think she was attacked some time before. Maybe the previous day. Long enough for her injuries to slow her down and for the ticks to latch on. .
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You can see us freely handling her - without any fear of being bitten. I swear she knew we were helping her. She was so gentle. Ten days of rest, water, and a break from the constant war of survival in the jungle - and she was strong enough to head back out! She’s probably out there now murdering all sorts of rodents and birds and even other snakes 😂🐍🤘🔥🔥🔥
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As @tbfrost and I have been saying for almost a year now - these animals are more complex then we give them credit for. They are not evil. I hope that if you love wildlife - especially snakes - you’ll share!!
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#snake #snakes #wildlifephotography #wildlife #snakesofinstagram #animallover #inspire #veterinarians #pets #cute #herpetology #reptiles #reptilesofinstagram #rainforest #amazon #wildlifeexplorer #compassion #peru #paulrosolie #wildlifeconservation #forest #wilderness #junglekeepers


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Paul Rosolie

Picture iron clouds and vast snowy forests. This is a book was a voyage to a place I've never been, had never really even heard of, with characters that were thrilling to meet. Both human and animal. .
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In the 'Rocks-Paper-Scissors' game of terrestrial predators, nothing beats tiger. And of the remaining tigers subspecies, from India to Thailand and Sumatra - none are as massive as the Amur Tiger. John Vaillant takes you to a place where the brown bears and wolves are culled by tigers. It's the biggest baddest extant land predator we have. So what happens when one has had enough of poachers? Apparently this tiger had been shot more than once, on more than one occasion, before it began hunting humans. .
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In this story you follow the story of a tiger, of a species, and of Yuri Trush, leader of the Tiger Inspection unit (who is one of the biggest badasses alive) who is responsible for containing the problem of a man-eater that had me pinching myself over and over again, as I read, to remember that this is a true story. This is far and away one of my very favorite non-fiction books, period. If you like nature and adventure, there is nothing I recommend more highly. Incredible book! .
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#currentlyreading #read #reading #bookshelf #bookstagram #literature #beautifulbooks #whatimreading #tiger #nature #authorsofinstagram #author #thetiger #thegirlandthetiger #animallover #adventure #johnvaillant


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Most of our time was antagonistic in nature. He would demand bananas, and if I didn’t give them, then he’d crush my tripod. Or threaten to knock over a jeep (no I’m not kidding). He could read what I cared about the most, and which things were expensive. The game was simple: ‘give me bananas or I’ll break your things’. He is an antagonizer, a giant selfish pain in the ass – and he loves the reaction as much as the payoff. Pretty much my spirit animal. So what was interesting to me were the times he knew I had nothing to give him, when I’d just be sitting with my notebook, drinking tea, and writing. He didn’t really know what to make of it. As time passed he’d try and take my notebook with his trunk. I yelled at him and he turned. Then pushed me over with his foot. I yelled at him again and he got upset and went to a tree where he was rubbing his eye against the bark. Then I felt bad. So I’d put down what I was doing and I rubbed his eyes with flat palms. He loved that. All the knocking things over, my crushed sunglasses – it was all just an attempt at communication. His wrinkled eyes closed under my palms as I rubbed. When I finished he searched my shoes and pockets and hair with his trunk. Then we just were standing there in the forest forehead to forehead – falling asleep. // Sometimes I wish they could just talk. Because at the end of the day we can only guess what goes on in their minds. Elephants have lost so much habitat and been so mercilessly murdered in the past century. It’s time to listen to what they are saying. .
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*This is a semi-wild elephant who lives in the forest, but who comes to camp when he feels like causing trouble. I’ll be sharing more on this project And the incredible work going on there in the months to come. //
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#elephants #elephant #animal #animallover #animallovers #bignose #sleep #peace #wildlifephotography #wildlife #wildlights #wilderness #india #incredibleindia #paulrosolie #authorsofinstagram #authorlife #thegirlandthetiger


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Paul Rosolie

This is the final part of the story by @gowrivaranashi and @runninngs - about Mahalinga Malik’s obsessive quest for water. .
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“I had dug out a further 65 feet into what was a 7th tunnel of sorts. I couldn’t stay in this passage for a long time as I would run out of breath very soon, since this ‘Suranga’ didn’t have a straight exit. As I toiled feverishly in anticipation, the moisture rose and now, the ‘Beedi’ had swelled to the girth of a Cigarette. This, I knew, was enough.
WATER, WATER, WATER! Happiness came over me like a boisterous, crashing, roaring wave…
Here I was, deep inside the belly of a hill. smiling the widest smile, my heart was flooded with joy. After more than 4 years of digging, I had finally struck water. After all the failed attempts, the questions, doubts and anxiety, my faith had been rewarded. Wide as a cigarette, a little stream that danced with life at my feet, it glistened golden in the failing light of my lamp. It appeared as though I was peering down at a rivulet of gold. But it was water. More precious than gold. Water! the stuff of dreams, the sole object of my desire, would now birth from this very spot and trickle out into the light, blowing the breath of life onto my land. It was all going to be alright!
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Lalita – my unfailing rock, my unflinching companion in the dark, my strength and the bearer of my dreams, was overjoyed when I told her of the good news. We spoke about it with great joy until we fell asleep. The kind man who gifted the land came to me and said, ‘Now you have nothing to fear! Go on and grow your own crops…’. We had a priest coming to bless the ‘Suranga’. Everybody from the villages nearby visited to congratulate us.
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ook around you now, what do you see? Arecanuts, Cacao, pepper, bananas, coconuts, various vegetables – all growing in abundance, from that little stream. I slowly dug for another 6 years through the same passage. I went in as deep as 200feet. The little stream that is as wide as a cigarette, today, gives me 6000 litres of water, every day.
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And that, is the story of how I found water… Do you have one for me?”


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Paul Rosolie

Continued from the last two posts - words by @runninngs & images by @gowrivaranashi .
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“Work on the second ‘Suranga’ began after the monsoon had passed. I chose another spot in my land and set to work. It was the same all over again – Climb Arecanut trees in the morning – return home at noon – step into the ‘Suranga’ with Lalita at night. Yet again, I was standing 60 feet into the hill. And yes, it took me another year to get here. The darkness here was no different than the previous tunnel. But something didn’t feel right. I found that there was no moisture at all in the mud. There was no sign of water. I had a feeling I wouldn’t find water in this tunnel. So I made a brave decision – I abandoned digging.
I hope you didn’t imagine I stopped digging altogether? I simply chose another spot to dig, further along the hill. This time, I felt great determination and carried on with some excitement. .
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I got to 60 feet in a couple of months and then dug another 30 feet. At 90 feet into the ‘Suranga’, I found some moisture. I was happy. It was for the first time that I held a clump of moist earth in my fist. But for some strange reason, I didn’t feel that this tunnel would give me the amount of water I needed. No exact science, no great knowledge of the earth was guiding me, it was just a voice in my head. I listened to it.
Sometimes, you begin to wonder if the path you chose is the right one because you’re the only one on it. My tunnels had yielded nothing. Maybe I was wrong. So, like everybody else had done and found water, I started digging a well. So I dug under open skies, employing a method followed by the masses. Lalita did not have to make the rounds anymore. I did this for a few months. It took a lot of effort and progress was slow. I seemed to be going nowhere. And then I abandoned this effort, too. I was just going to do what I had become so good at – digging Surangas.
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Lalita and I began all over again. This was our fourth tunnel. We had been digging and moving earth for years now. Hopeful that this one would bring us water, we carried on intently. At 70 feet in, the inevitable happened. We ran into a huge boulder.”


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Paul Rosolie

**Continued from last night’s post - story by @runninngs & @gowrivaranashi :
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“One day, I found myself standing 60 feet into this passage. It was pitch dark inside. The flame in my lamp had just flickered and died. I wiped the beads of sweat from my brow and realised I had taken one whole year to get here. Why did it take me one year?
Though I was making the steady progress of a few inches into my grand design everyday, I was still a daily wage worker and I still needed to make ends meet. So I would climb trees everyday, bringing down arecanut for my employer until late after noon. Then at 5 pm, I would start digging in the ‘Suranga’. I would dig late into the night; sweaty and tired as I went deeper. Sometimes, it became hard to breathe. Everyday, I would make a progress of not more than a few inches…

Looking at how deep the tunnel was, I was pleased with our efforts. It seemed as if, at any moment, with just the next strike of my pick axe, a sparkling jet of water would spring out and stream out of the tunnel. Water did come. Not from the earth but from skies above, furiously, like an angered god. I woke up one day to see the tunnel had collapsed. One year of digging and moving earth had literally been washed away.

Before I tell you about the second attempt. I must tell you about my source of light in the tunnels: I carried 3-4 ‘deepas’; tiny, oil lamps made with clay. The ones you would light at home during Deepawali. They were easy to carry and my best option as I would not carry kerosene or other lamps because they gave out smoke, which was bad in a confined area. I used coconut oil so there was no smoke at all. I carried the oil in a little alcohol bottle and refilled the lamps whenever they ran dry. The light was very feeble but just about enough to illuminate the wall before me. I placed the lamps along the passage so that Lalita would be able to see her way out. When I had to dig the roof sections, I would make a small hole in the wall and place the lamp in the pocket. I had not known darkness like this before. It didn’t matter what time it was. In here, it was always the darkest night.”
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Continued tonight -


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